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If only the Trump Twitter feed had more soft words and gentle answers

There is a time to keep silence, and a time to speak, observes Qoheleth, the voice of the Book of Ecclesiastes (3:7). Proverbs talks about the wise man using words with restraint; about those who have understanding being even-tempered: even a fool is thought to be wise when he is is silent (17:27f). And when the mouth has to be opened, we are told that gentle answers turn away wrath, but harsh words stir up anger (15:1).

The Trump Twitter feed gushes with condemnation, disapprobation and division: if you’re not for him, you’re against him, and if you’re against him, you’re “dishonest”, “Fake News”, “phony”, “sick”, “DISTORTING DEMOCRACY in our country!”, “highly slanted”, with an “agenda of hate”, “phony sources”, “fabricated lies” and “the enemy of the American People.”

Trump Twitter insults abound: as of 15th August 2017, there were 359 people, places and things. No doubt the past week has added a dozen more. He is thought to be on track for 650 by the end of his first term:

Mr. Trump has repeatedly used Twitter to denigrate the law, calling it “failing”, “broken”, “dead”, a “disaster”, “in a death spiral”, “bad healthcare”, “imploding fast”, “a complete and total disaster,” “torturing the American People,” among other things.

…Insults have included “Witch Hunt”, “phony”, “Sad!”, “fabricated by Dems as an excuse for losing the election”, a “taxpayer funded charade”, “a total hoax”, “A total scam!”, “FAKE NEWS”, “the single greatest WITCH HUNT in American political history.”

It is therefore unsurprising that even when Trump is preaching peace and reconciliation, the dominant response is that of jeering and scorn. The medium is the message, and the Trump Twitter feed is basically belligerent and bellicose, and contempt breeds hate. It’s hard to preach love in a war zone: bullets and bombs have to be met with tanks and missiles. ‘Blessed are the peacemakers’ doesn’t pass muster in Aleppo: it’s kill or be killed. That’s basically Twitter, except the ammo is verbiage.

If President Trump isn’t inclined to soft words and gentle answers, how about a period of Twitter Trappism? Silence is golden, after all. It can move people to shame (Jn 8:1-11); impart knowledge (Lk 22:63-65); and express mercy (22:54-62). You don’t have to give a verbal answer to everything in order to make your thoughts known: silence can speak.

And silence transcends: it makes us more attentive to God; more able to hear what He might be saying.

In politics, of course, silence may be construed as weakness, acquiescence or admission: ‘If you don’t rebut this, you must be guilty’, and so the taunts escalate in the media until the pressure can be contained no more. And that’s essentially the function of the Trump Twitter feed: it’s a pressure valve for the many millions of Americans who have long felt abandoned, ignored and sidelined by the liberal political elites of the global secular enlightenment. By his harsh tweets against the vested interests of the status quo, President Trump believes he is forging a successful relationship with this vast American constituency – even liberating them from decades of suffering and oppression. Whether or not he is, of course, is a matter of robust debate, but that doesn’t stop the Trump Twitter feed singing a song of hope and pride for those who have ears.

It isn’t too late for President Trump to heal America and make it great again, but he needs to learn when to make a noise and when to be silent; when to slap down the pompous twit and when to turn the other cheek . Dr Clarence Jones – the African-American speechwriter who helped Martin Luther King craft his 1963 ‘I Have a Dream’ speech – was asked what the civil rights legend would say to the current incumbent of the White House. He answered softly and gently:

“I have no question,” says Dr Jones, “that the pre-eminent apostle of love and non-violence in the 20th Century would remind President Trump he has a responsibility to indicate to the nation what is right and what is wrong.

“This is not a time to engage in moral relativity.

“I really believe that President Trump is not beyond redemption, that he still has an opportunity to rise to the majesty of the office.”

There is majesty in dignified silence: ‘Even a fool, when he holds his peace, is counted wise: and he that shuts his lips is esteemed a man of understanding‘ (Prov 17:28). Twitter’s tinkling cymbal isn’t the best medium for moral illumination.

  • It isn’t too late for President Trump to heal America and make it great again

    Brother Nathanael, the American Jew who embraced Christianity, believes that America was never great but that she could become great. He advocates closing down the Federal Reserve Bank, repealing Roe v Wade (abortion), repealing Obergefell v Hodges (same-sex marriage), repealing the open immigration law of 1965 and registering certain lobbyists as agents of a foreign power. ‘If we’re going to make America great—not again, it never was—we start by ending the agendas of God’s enemies in a short one hundred days.’

    • IanCad

      I suggest Brother Nathanael reads a little history. Twice in the last century – thrice if you count the Cold War – they saved our sorry asses from the Germans. They, in the person of Norman Borlaug, have saved more people from starvation than the rest of the world combined. Sure, Rachael Carson helped balance the credit column. I believe they are the only folk who have walked on the moon.
      I think the Americans are a great people – They have done so much to improve the lot of mankind. The suggestions you cite are admirable and apart from the Federal Reserve, which at least needs auditing, the other two should be up to the individual states to decide on. And Yes!! Washington needs a haircut – let’s hope Trump sharpens his scissors.

      • @ IanCad—If the thread below the video is still open, I’m sure Brother Nathanael would welcome your comments. I tend to see the bad as well as the good in peoples and countries.

        • IanCad

          Don’t get me wrong Johnny, your post a couple of days back gave me a kick in the backside. I have been the most frightfully good non-discriminatory chap and must admit that logic, history, aspirations (of the Muslims) has me scrambling for another way.

          Both you and Dreadnaught have been constant in your concern for the future of our country. The problem is; how does one immersed in the principles of non-prejudice and British fairness counter the threat/problem without denying the rights of our adopted subjects? Quite the three pipe problem.
          You wrote:

          “….there is a price for their righteousness and it will be paid by their children and grandchildren.” And as I wrote; This must be the basis for all debate as to how to handle the quandary. It is wholly immoral to pass this on to future generations.

          • @ IanCad—how does one immersed in the principles of non-prejudice and British fairness counter the threat/problem without denying the rights of our adopted subjects?

            If we treat Muslims fairly, Britain will eventually become a Muslim country, assuming a continuation of present birth rates. Islam is very clear that Christians living in a Muslim land must be allowed to worship, provided that they adhere to various conditions which, basically, are designed to make life so difficult that Christians give up the struggle and convert. So, if Britain did become Muslim, Christianity would not be wiped out, at least not immediately. The question is, are you happy to bequeath that future to your descendants? Assuming the answer is No, start voting for politicians who promise to end Muslim immigration and who will prohibit the building of new mosques and outlaw halal slaughter, to drive home to Muslims that they have outstayed their welcome. The final stage would be the voluntary repatriation of Muslims.

          • IanCad

            So! Are you saying get tough now to prevent civil war later? This is serious stuff. I’m not up on the history of Muslim immigration other than it seems to have been going on for a long time and now appears to be accelerating. It can be swept under the rug for only just so long.

          • bluedog

            What’s taken you so long, IC? Civil war is inevitable. As their numbers grow they will start to take and hold land, at first informally by achieving a majority within a discrete locality. Then, thanks to democracy, they can formalise their position by demanding recognition as an Islamic borough, or such political unit as is appropriate. If Oldham council now starts proceedings with Islamic prayers, this validates the point being made. More serious is the possibility of state intervention in this process of Islamifiication. We recently saw the Turkish government demand the right of Turks in the Netherlands to vote in a Turkish election. The Dutch government declined and there was something of a diplomatic incident. It’s not too hard to imagine a Muslim political party in Britain being sponsored by a Muslim power.

          • IanCad

            I’m thinking – I’m thinking……
            It hurts.

          • Manfarang

            Whether the Turkish citizens living in the Netherlands have the right to vote in a Turkish election is a right given by the Turkish government . The question was the Dutch government didn’t want a Turkish minister to address a meeting of Turkish nationals there.

          • Martin

            JR

            Do you not think God is in control?

          • @ Martin—I’m happy to assume that God is in control. Even so, I believe I am correct in saying that Christians have only ever successfully protected themselves against Islam by force.

          • Martin

            JR

            Were the early Christians busy protecting themselves against Saul?

          • Send them all to Afghanistan, it’s under-populated.

          • Manfarang

            Far from converting westerners and others who live and work in the Gulf countries go to church. The churches are thriving there.

      • No they didn’t. We had beaten off the Germans in 1940 by ourselves.
        The Yanks took advantage of our position when we were desperate for ships by sending us rust-buckets that needed patching up before we could use them in battle then charged us double because we were desperate, the greedy profit hungry b******ds.
        The Russians had the courage to be the first ones into space beforehand.
        The Americans have made mankind in the west fat with their huge food portion sizes linked to making huge profits for American companies.

        • Mrs Proudie of Barchester

          And Henry Ford bankrolled the Nazi Party…

          • Martin

            Mrs P

            Martin Chuzzlewit is an interesting essay on the character of the USA.

          • Well there was mutual business interests, Hitler was building roads and the Yanks cars. Anywhere there’s a profit there’s the Americans. Volkswagen was more Ford.

          • …and a fair portion of Britain’s nobility stood with and did business with Hitler, not to mention Bank of England’s polite handing over of 20-odd tons of Czech gold, to Churchill’s disgust.

            Don’t get me wrong, Mrs Proudie, I don’t expect foresight from historical actors; all the nervous eyes were on the vile Bolshies and Hitler did fool almost everyone right up to the time he rolled into Poland.

          • IrishNeanderthal

            I have been running into statements suggesting that both Hitler and Mussolini rose to power because people were afraid of Communism: maybe Franco could be added to that number.

          • Probably; when people get scared and start running, they sometimes don’t know when to stop. Back then the Bolshies in Italy made the Brigada Rossa look like weekend dabblers. Franco provided the Russians a good testing platform for their Spetznaz units and the first monoplane fighter-bombers. Came in handy against the Huns.

        • Manfarang

          By ourselves- Canadian, South African, Australian and New Zealander support and where do think the oil came from to fuel our aircraft and ships..

          • We had prepared for war the second time around. Fuel had been stored as we anticipated difficulty in getting supplies through and it was the first thing to be rationed. Large cars were confiscated and converted to ambulances and vans.
            Our allies were nowhere to be seen when we needed them most.
            I think had it not been for the tremendous effort from literally everyone pulling together and sacrificing a lot we would not have beaten off the Hun. And Churchill kept up the moral as well.

          • Manfarang

            The Royal Navy was much bigger than the German navy and thus the Germans couldn’t get their land forces across the channel. Radar was of great help in the air. Regarding sacrifice, British people didn’t have much choice. There was a spirit in those days which has long been lost.

        • bluedog

          You may need to consider what would have been the situation if Hitler resisted the temptation to invade Russia in 1941, and if Japan had focussed on the European empires in Asia rather than prodding the US into fire and fury in the same year. In the view of this writer the survival of the UK became entirely dependent on two mistakes, the Nazi invasion of Russia and the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor. Absent these we would almost certainly have lost India by say 1944, and by the 1950’s Australia and NZ. In Europe, with France fully absorbed by Germany and with Spain potentially joining the Axis, we would have been expelled from the Mediterranean by say, 1945, loosing Gibraltar to Spain. If Ireland then had thrown in its lot with the Axis, a European fleet could potentially have cut Britain off from Canada and the US. Now, where were we?

          • It was a big mistake of Hitler to ignore history and invade Russia and there was also no need for the Japanese to bomb Pearl Harbour in December 1941 either, but they did and Churchill dealt with these facts, and we won.

  • Linus

    “It isn’t too late for President Trump to heal America…”

    Get it right. It isn’t too late for President Trump to HEEL America. You could at least quote him correctly.

    How does one heel America? It’s debatable considering there’s no such verb. He may have been abbreviating the longer “to come to heel”, in which case his aim is to make America follow him like an obedient dog. Given his overbearing character this would seem to be the most likely explanation.

    An alternative may be “to transform into a heel”, i.e. to exploit or pauperize, which again would not be inconsistent with his personality, based as it is around winning at all costs and the devil take the consequences.

    Another explanation may be “to crush beneath his heel”, which would sit nicely with his known arrogance and contempt for those who oppose him.

    Whatever his true meaning, peace and reconciliation are clearly the last things on his mind. Trump wants to divide and rule. That’s been his aim since day one. Trying to persuade a sower of dissension to bring people together in peace and harmony is a pointless task. Even a naive dolt of a Pixtian should be able to recognise that.

    • Inspector General

      Linus. Dear Linus. It is the most wonderful thing! All those protests organised by the incandescent self interest groups that ran America with Obama’s help have now subsided. There will be no storming of the White house. No crippling general strike. The easily impressed sheep that were your fellow travellers have gone home to get on with their lives in Trump’s America.

      All that are left holding placards are you career malcontents. About 1 in 20 of the population.

      You see, nobody cares. If the truth be known, they never really did…

      • Linus

        Americans will do what Americans do. It’s not my country and how it governs itself is none of my concern.

        I do note however that these “1 in 20 malcontents” have frustrated every attempt of Trump to implement his policies. There’s no travel ban, or at least it’s so watered down it affects virtually nobody. There’s no wall on the Mexican border and certainly no agreement from them to pay for one. Obamacare has not been replaced with any other health care scheme. Equal marriage remains legal. The White House has had a revolving door fitted to cope with the rapid staff turnover as Trump burns through a succession of right wing ideologues who just can’t get enough of his own party on side to get any major initiatives through Congress.

        It’s anything but business as usual in Washington DC. Most presidents aren’t considered as lame ducks until the final year or so of their term. Trump was labeled as such as soon as his first policy was struck down by the courts. The next four years, if he lasts that long, will be one long defeat for him. At least domestically.

        As I’ve said elsewhere, his only chance of making a mark is to provoke conflict with North Korea or even China. This may still happen, at which time his ability to effect change domestically will increase. But until it does, he’s a non-president who will be remembered as one of the most ineffectual in US history.

        This is of course none of my concern. As long as he paces around in the prison the White House has become for him without provoking an international conflict, he’s someone else’s problem. He’s certainly not mine. And he’s nobody’s champion either. Champions do things. What has Trump done?

        • Inspector General

          He is 8 months into a 4 year term. Be patient…

        • You make good points. His Yankie bombastic bluster is only stirring everyone up into a frenzy.
          He should calm down and build bridges with his own party. This takes a lot of effort and time but worth it when they begin to see his visions are actually quite sensible. He might get one or two passed Congress even, although there is the deep state to out manoeuvre as well.

          • The only ones stirred-up are his already frothing opponents, Marie; his base support has hardly budged and in this super-polarized climate, there are virtually no undecideds left.

            He cannot build bridges because a critical number of RINO (Republican in name-only) senators and Congressional reps will never approve key measures of his policies without pressure. Let’s see how effectively Steve Bannon can goose those fellows into correct thinking with a weaponized Breitbart…

        • What has Trump done? LGood of you to ask. Let’s see…

          – lifted the stock market to unprecedented highs
          – revived the energy sector
          – defeated ISIS in Iraq
          – confirmed a Constitutionalist SC justice
          – started a serious rebuilding of the military
          – reduced manufacturing regulations
          – kicked up the manufacturing index to a 30 year high
          – cajoled NATO allies to contribute 10 billion so far
          – brought illegal immigration down by 70%
          – decreased inflation
          – stopped the rise of the unemployment rate
          – decreased the US debt by nearly $ 1 trillion
          – doubled housing sales and
          – brought over a million new jobs

          All this in his first 8 months, amidst a circus of political melt-downs and media freak-outs. Some lame duck…

          • Manfarang

            The defeat of daesh in Iraq is due to the measures of his predecessors as was the increase in new jobs. It will be interesting to hear what Trump has to say about Afghanistan. I an expecting him to announce a continuing American presence but like Vietnam the Afghans have no hearts and minds that regard the Americans as good guys.

          • The creation of Daesh, ISIS, ISIL or most appropriately the Islamic Caliphate …just to remind folks what it’s all about… was largely his predecessors’ doing, namely Obama…again, a reminder. How kind of Obama to arrange the stock market explosion, new jobs and flood of investments just in time for his successor!

            Most of Trump’s base is for pulling out of the Afghanistan shit-hole, which is understandable, but leaving another space for ISIS and a possible take over of nuclear-tipped Pakistan would be a very bad idea. No matter what Afghanis think about Americans, the “nation building” nonsense of the Bush years was a waste of resources and American lives, so the best thing would be to keep a few bases for keeping down the mujaheddin from getting too comfortable, while keeping the troops away from the mixing with the dangerous population.

          • Manfarang

            … was largely his predecessors’ doing, namely Bush.
            The lessons of history which the British learnt was not to stay in Afghanistan for a long time.

          • That was in the halcyon days of flintlocks, Lee Enfields and mountain pass battles, Manfarang, the bucolic old times when the blighters could leave their harems and goats and be back for afternoon kebab before their cousins could move in. Can’t leave and forget about them anymore. Nowadays it’s about jumping on a Qatar airlines red eye, waving past customs and immigration while a group of Icelander high school kids are having their innards scanned, and wreak havoc by evening.

          • Manfarang

            Some things haven’t changed that much. When the Pashtuns are again part of the government then things may calm down.

          • Looks like that’s going to have to be sorted out by the Afghanis in the future, perhaps with the help of the stick and the carrot, but from a distance. The new “Trump doctrine” is as clear as it’s refreshing: The US military is there to kill bad people, not to build a nation. Some of the critics are right in calling it “old,” but it’s good-old, in that it returns soldiers to soldiering, not to PR, tribal council peacemaking and social work.

          • Anna

            “No matter what Afghanis think about Americans, the “nation building” nonsense of the Bush years was a waste of resources and American lives…”

            Agreed. If the Americans had taken the trouble to read up about past Afghan wars with the British, they might have known they were getting into a war they could never win. Alternatively, as a colleague once pointed out, the Americans were never serious about winning this war and it was all set up for the benefit of the US arms industry. A former Pakistani general even predicted this outcome. Sadly, modern Western leaders are ignorant of history and the MSM is full of people who seem to think that the future of mankind is hinged around the success of the ‘Gay Revolution’.

          • Agreed, Anna, except for the staple Middle Eastern taxi driver theorem by the Pakistani about Americans and their sinister arms industry. Not that I blame anyone for hating that which creams them every time they poke their heads out and sends out fleets of boats that can vitrify whole continents on their own. But there are much cheaper and better platforms and even hot locations for testing systems than the ME. The transport, loss of personnel and political costs …if we want to get cynical… are astronomical expenses.

            No, Bush and company, not to mention almost everyone at one time, seriously believed that we are all the same, that we want the same things, as long as we have elections and a nice middle class life to look forward to. Just expressing doubt about some people not actually caring much for such boring stuff, as I did tentatively a few times, used to get a lot of negative blow-back from every part of the poli-spectrum.

          • Manfarang

            What you see behind the President’s desk. I think he meant when you sit behind the President’s desk.
            Afghanistan. Well Trump wants to send in NATO troops- Poland, Estonia, Latvia…
            The unending and unwinnable war.

          • Good for NATO, which needs to remember what it’s for. Even better for the countries you mention, which unlike their “betters” to west, are actually chomping at the bit for an opportunity to upgrade their training, combat experience and equipment. That war and other wars may be unending, but what is winnable is control and containment.

          • Linus

            The stock market has lifted itself to unprecendented levels. Trump has done little or nothing to make that happen. It’s more the reaction of free market capitalists to the lifting of the threat Clinton’s interventionist policies would have posed to their profits. It would have happened no matter who the successful Republican candidate was.

            If by “reviving the energy sector” you mean “increasing the energy sector’s profits at the expense of consumers” then yes, he’s certainly done that. As would any Republican president. That’s what Republican presidents do: favour corporate profit over the ability of lower earners to make ends meet.

            And as for his other “achievements”, like any politician he’ll claim sole responsibility for the positive cyclical trends that were already well underway during the final phase of his predecessor’s term. That’s politics. But the fact remains that all of Trump’s major initiatives have been frustrated by an uncooperative Congress and this does not look as though it will change any time soon.

            I personally don’t think he’ll last the course. Used to the dictatorial power of a corporate boss, he clearly finds the constraints and limits of public office extremely trying. Like a petulant child, if he can’t play the game his way, he doesn’t want to play at all.

            Time will tell.

          • Anton

            Looking forward to President Pence then? I’d be happy with that.

            You are right that Trump isn’t responsible for the stock market high. You are wrong that it is reaction of free market capitalists to the lifting of the threat Clinton’s interventionist policies would have posed to their profits. It is due almost entirely to the Fed’s money printing policies.

          • Linus

            The US quantative easing policy was in force for a long time before Trump irrupted onto the scene.

            The current boom in US stocks is a reaction to a free market Republican administration. The same levels of liquidity were available before Trump’s victory. But the prospect of 4 more years of low returns with a Democrat government siphoning off a major share of profits to fund their tax and spend programs kept growth in check.

          • Well, go ahead and rationalize every point as a coincidence, Linus, until you sound no better than the most demented soap box prophet on a street corner. O, the dreaded, evil corporations (unless they are high tech or “green” robber barons)…maybe we should let the state own and run everything with its tame uni grads right down to the corner stores because, as we all see again and again, that super-smart economic model works very well.

            Yes, Republicans favour production, business with wiggle room to move in and exploiting and exporting energy rather than buying it from primitives who want them dead. Such enables lower earners to get out of the hole and off endless benefits and entitlements…only that they need to employ at least some of their customers, instead of the commie Chinese peasants and Indian programmers in Delhi. The hapless Dems, on the other hand, like to keep half of the population on food stamps and little freebies, and Blacks on welfare in their rotting ghettos, so that ever-growing armies of unionized planners, teachers and social workers can continue voting for them. Until they run out of other people’s money, as the saying goes.

          • Linus

            As far as hackneyed tropes are concerned, you’ve clearly cornered the market. Impressive work for an ex-commie. You’ve learned every rule of free enterprise and play the game as though born to it.

            Odd though that you should have chosen Canada, that model of all things socialist and progressive, as your adoptive homeland. Would the Americans not let you in? So you thought you’d move next door and hope for a Québec independence vote that might see the English-speaking provinces seek to join the Union. Become American by the back door, so to speak.

            It’s your only chance. In the meantime, enjoy your charming and popular prime minister and his right-on government. Is it a case of out of the frying pan, into the fire?

          • Bingo, even you get to chance into one now and again. Americans wouldn’t let us in because Dad, of blessed memory, fessed-up that Grand-dad, also of blessed memory, was a commie partisan and a co-founder of a local communist party cell. Dad running away with us because he’d be in trouble for student activism against the Soviet occupation didn’t move the consulate curmudgeon and there was no Hawaiian judge or 9th Circuit Court back then to weep over us. From all the choices we had, my folks chose Canada because they knew people here and it was far from Yurup; I wanted South Africa or Australia…I have a thing for frontiers…but Mom, of blessed memory as well, thought that SA will collapse and turn into a shit-hole overnight (women are so silly, sometimes) and she didn’t like Australia because of the snakes there.

            I love my PM, of course; two more years of his toothy grins, selfies and photo-bombs, and the country will swing so far to the right of The Donald that it’ll fly off the planet.

          • Linus

            I’m not at all surprised. You’ve always given off the air of someone who picked up the Monopoly card that reads: “Congratulations! You have won second prize in a beauty contest…” You should feel happy and proud. But really you resent not winning the top prize.

            But there you are, stuck in your booby prize of a country trying to make the best of it while you look wistfully over the border regretting what can never be. There’s a certain poetic justice in that, especially given Trudeau’s firm grip on power and his poster-boy status as the champion of liberal progressiveness. World leaders are queuing up to be photographed with him. The new GAY Irish prime minister has even come to march with him in a Pride event and be supported in his campaign to legalise abortion in his country. How that must stick in your craw! Not only do you want to be somewhere else – somewhere that just doesn’t want you – but where you are is a beacon of everything you hate.

            Nothing I can say can make you suffer any more than you already do. But it certainly does my heart some good to see someone reaping so much of what he sows.

          • You’re off target so often, Linus, that I wonder how you get through life without getting run over by someone in a bicycle. I adore Canada and prefer it to the US, by far. I don’t lose sleep over the gay events stuff as you think, and you’re forgetting that we had two very good terms with Steven Harper before people got tired of good times, a growing economy and shrinking national debt. That got reversed a bit, and Canada’s problem is similar to States’; a top-heavy system with tenacious bureaucratic barnacles and a homogeneous liberal media. Once Trump shows us how, we’ll be doing big-time draining as well to finish the job Harper started. We don’t have masses of illegal aliens, Muslim no-go zones and the kind of dismal ghettos you see in the US. With “visible minorities” doing well even in the first generation and good social safety nets Liberals can’t buy them off with food stamps. The thing is, even with silly Justin and his antics, you wouldn’t notice any changes unless you are at the very bottom or the very top. The “social justice” nuttery bills will be flicked-off or blunted as it’s usually the case whenever Conservatives get behind the helm.

            But if it gives you funny thrills, go ahead and imagine me writhing on the floor, screaming like a Banshee through a ball gag, drowning in my own acid of hate for Justin and the decked-out pervs downtown.

          • Maalaistollo

            So should I restore Canada to my list of possible retirement destinations? I had rather supposed that it would be Sharia4Canuckistan well before Sharia4UK, with everyone going around muttering ‘Whatever, pbuh’ eh?

          • Absolutely, if you can handle or learn to enjoy the winters. With our two major federal parties being essentially one party divided by different election poster colours and whether the PMs are from the West or Quebec, the big brouhaha over taking in folks from Syria was more of a show to quiet down the SJWs and Brussels, but the actual numbers are low enough and the ones who are getting here are mostly vetted for blandness, education and skills and they mostly want to work, make decent money and enjoy a nice house with a green lawn to settle in for a boring life in suburbia. Consider me as your mine canary; I can still walk with my kippa on and fringes hanging out and swinging anywhere in Toronto without getting even a nasty look…quite often a puzzled and friendly hello, in fact. When it’s the Conservatives’ (blue) turn to take over from the Liberals (red), they’ll cut the “family reunification” electoral bribe thing, as they always do, so as not to flood the strained hospitals and social services with abandoned grandparents and surplus wives who need hip replacements, a life time’s worth of dental care and culturally sensitive assisted living.

          • Maalaistollo

            Not good with cold winters, but fine with rain, so thought Vancouver Island would be the place. Geared up to deal with geriatrics and not too many adherents of the religion of peace there, it seems. Quite apart from the climate, Toronto is too big and weird for me. When I was there a few years ago I saw an ad from a church celebrating the patron saint of leather workers with a service designed to appeal to leather fetishists. Coming soon to the C of E, I imagine.

          • Pubcrawler

            One not a mile away from me used to celebrate a ‘Goth Eucharist’.

          • len

            Not bad for a start!

    • Congratulations, Linus, for having proudly reclaimed your first moniker and re-established your natural identity. There is hope in that.

      It’s fun to trash others’ spelling, but homophones in fast Twitter postings is unlikely to lead to an impeachment…although, the way they’ve been grabbing onto anything, the Dems might very well try that one.

      • Linus

        Illiteracy is a serious handicap for any politician. Or it should be.

        • Maalaistollo

          I’m not sure that weakness in spelling is the same as illiteracy. I understand that Andrew Johnson, the 17th POTUS (1865 to 1869) was regarded as practically illiterate.

          • Linus

            I know little of US presidents beyond the commonly held belief that Washington had wooden teeth made out of a cherry tree that he claimed to have chopped down himself. Oh, and Lincoln freed the slaves and ritually slaughtered vampires. Apparently it was they who had him shot in a wilk booth, although I’m not entirely sure what a wilk might be – some kind of outlandish colonial wildlife perhaps? A cross between a wolf and an elk?

            Then there was Franklin Delano Roosevelt, who was famous enough to have a Parisian métro station named after him. Quite why I’m not sure. Something to do with lending and leasing I seem to recall, although what to whom is a mystery to me. He was followed (perhaps not directly) by John Fitzgerald Kennedy, a notorious philanderer who lived in a glitzy castle with a French wife whose name translates as something approximating “clodhopper”, which of course at the time made le Tout Paris rush about in panic at the prospect of having to receive her. The needs of diplomacy being what they are however, she and her husband were finally invited to the Elysée, although my mother assured me that Tante Yvonne was NOT happy about it and only managed to get through the evening by dint of a small phial of strong ammonia concealed in her moustache. To add insult to injury, quite apart from the low extraction of the wife, the husband had a whole harem of concubines, which was of course something the famously prurient Générale could not abide. The most famous of these ladies was later to die in a crash in a road tunnel in Paris, inspiring Elton John to pen a song about her tragic life entitled “Candle In The Windsor”. It’s thought this may be a reference to the odd sex life she admitted had caused her to wander from her British husband, who was, as rumour has it, a member of that country’s royal family.

            That’s about it, I’m afraid. All other American presidents (I know they’ve had several) are just a grey blur of nobodies and nonentities. Not one of them had his seize quartiers and would therefore never have been received in any decent house in Paris, bar the Elysée of course, and then only through gritted teeth. Now we have a plebeian Picard residing at that address, things have changed of course. Trump was there recently and apparently commented on the drabness of the interiors.

            Need I say more?

          • Maalaistollo

            Best not! I fear that you have been imbibing some of the restoratives that dear Mrs Proudie keeps in her medicine cupboard; I urge you to desist before your transition into Mrs P No 2 is complete and the poor bishop is completely outnumbered.

          • Linus

            No transition necessary. Just a change of clothes. La Proudie is clearly an Anglican curate of the male variety. The crinoline is just a ploy and nobody is fooled.

            Of course I’m not suggesting that he’s transgender. Just a very bad drag act. Of the Widow Twankey variety, only considerably more like a rugby player.

          • Maalaistollo

            If you persist in such outrageous suggestions it will either be Hob-Nobs at dawn or, if there is any truth in what you say, you may experience the dreadful fate suggested by the Revd Sydney Smith, namely to be ‘preached to death by wild curates.’

          • Linus

            Thank you, but it will be hobnobs at precisely no time of day. I wouldn’t touch such vile fare with my bargeman’s péniche. Trois sous‘ worth of oats mixed with sugar syrup and a pound of lard. Malbouffe of such noisome composition is banned in Paris. For human consumption that is, although I’m told that folk of a meaner sort do feed such things to their pigs.

            And worry ye not. I’ve met Anglican curates in the flesh, of which, unfortunately enough, they seem to possess rather a lot. Believe me when I say that I have no trouble holding my own against them. Indeed it’s all one can do really. They will keep on clutching at it and one does have standards, ye know!

        • Well, then, you go tell ’em, Linus; the vote recount, the Islamophobia thing, Russia-Russia-Russia and now the Trump as the Grand Kleegle of the KKK all fizzed out, so they’re sure to jump on this one.

          • Linus

            Oh, I think you’ll find Russia-Russia-Russia is still burning away. On a slow fuse.

            But I agree with you. There’s no need to wait for imperial eagles to come home to roost. Poor orthography is cause enough for immediate dismissal.

          • True enough; Russia-Russia-Russia will smolder away ’til 2024 and then flare up a bit when Nikki Haley grabs the WH.

          • Linus

            Interesting. As we know what the current president likes to grab, one can only assume that WH must be current American slang for vagina.

            Who knew that Ms Haley was a lesbian? Or is she bisexual? It seems odd that she would engage in white male heterosexist sexual assault however. Are you sure you have your facts straight (sic)?

            If so, one wonders what WH stands for? Wet Handshake? Willy Holder? Womb Hall? Do enlighten us.

          • Use an acronym finder. Stands for Waffle House, I think. All I know is that it’s on 1600 Pennsylvania Avenue, just past the swamps.

  • Father David

    Is government by Twitter really the best way to “Make America Great Again”? Thinking about Trump’s first few months in office the song “There were ten in the bed and the little one said ‘Roll over, Roll over’, so they all rolled over and one fell out there were nine in the bed and the little one said Roll over, Roll over.” comes to mind . To date nine senior members of the White House staff have jumped or were pushed. How long will it be before Trump himself has to go? How long, O Lord, how long?

  • Inspector General

    It’s been a few centuries since English kings led their forces in battle. Had tweeting been around then, you’d have the very same.

    Trump is engaging with ‘normal’ America. That’s us people here who follow you, Cranmer, the same but not in America. Ordinary types who don’t have organised outraged groups to represent them. The very groups that make it clear they don’t want him as president, and would, if they could, throw him out.

    He’s onto a winner, Cranmer. So do get on-side, when you can, but don’t leave it too late, and be very careful whom you are associated with. We don’t want “women’s choice” degenerates putting you forward for a media award, do we!

  • IanCad

    Were Trump to keep silent, it would be accounted as defeat. No! The leftist media dogs, the statists, the useful idiots, would declare victory and double their efforts to overthrow him. He needs to continue just as he has – it’s down and dirty out there.
    Even on the BBCR4 this AM the party members have their daily hate sessions. Rabid, hysterical, confused, illogical; I can’t help hink that Trump has morphed into Emmanuel Goldstein in the eyes of the chattering classes.

    • Inspector General

      Hear! Hear!

  • LoveMeIamALiberal

    The left use Twitter to post vile nonsense about anyone with conservative views. Trump is turning the weapon against them and giving them a taste of their own medicine. It is not pretty but it is glorious to watch the twitterati getting a beating. Of this this is the nature of Twitter: no time or space for intelligent, nuanced arguments. The only way to be soft and gentle is not to use Twitter.

  • Anton

    It isn’t too late for President Trump to heal America and make it great again, but he needs to learn when to make a noise and when to be silent

    That’s exactly what he’s doing, Your Grace. He’s a businessman learning politics in real time. Please remember that “soft words and gentle answers” are what Hillary Clinton would have given even as she stole more and more freedoms from the American people. Let us judge Donald Trump by what he does, not what he says. In which case he’s doing just fine so far.

    • Merchantman

      You need to appreciate that the Supreme Court is no longer a safe place for liberal extremists to go and twist the truth. In fact it is now noticeable that all of a sudden fewer controversial cases to push the liberal agenda are risking it in the Supreme Court. There is indeed a hush, from an unusual source, one created by Trump’s appointment.

  • TropicalAnglican

    The article below was written by a Christian who was in Charlottesville, Virginia, on the day of the riots, and witnessed firsthand what happened:

    http://www.christianpost.com/news/charlottesville-jesus-commands-us-tell-the-truth-so-why-arent-we-196130/

    He states he was confused by the [let me add: one-eyed, lopsided, distorted and totally biased] media coverage:
    “Very little if any coverage was being given to the various Communist and Marxist groups and violent Black Lives Matter and Antifa activists. It was as if the white supremacists were the only ones who were filled with hate.”
    He then repeats President Trump’s statement: “We condemn in the strongest possible terms this egregious display of hatred, bigotry, and violence on many sides, on many sides.”
    What does the eyewitness say?: “His statement was accurate.”

    Trump has already said it before, if the press reported accurately, he could stop tweeting overnight. His tweets are basically to counter the liberal MSM (mainstream media) bias. And I actually find many of his tweets wildly entertaining. There are, of course, unsupportable tweets and tweets that should never have seen the light of day, but they are really not that large a number, just as the number of white supremacists is small compared to those of the Marxists/socialists/far left.

    Brad Huddleston, the author, ends with:
    “Both extremes were represented in Charlottesville on that scary day. To give the extreme left a pass, and even affirm them, would make Hitler proud.”

    I recommend this article!

    • Notforinfants

      Thanks for the link, and yes, a good post from the Christian who was present (as opposed to the views of many who were not).

      For an excellent over-view of the whole Charlottsville incident let me warmly commend the insightful comment of Brendan O’Neill editor of the excellent website ‘Spiked’. Nothing particularly ‘Christian’ about it, but he presents a realistic perspective on the protagonists.

      In case you miss this, then consider his clincher:-:

      “” A suspected hard-right fanatic killed one person at Charlottesville, in a foul assault on life and liberty; Islamists, if we add Barcelona, have killed more than 460 people in Europe in the past three years. Four-hundred-and-sixty. Let that sink in.”
      To which I added:
      That says it all. There is simply no comparison between so called ‘white supremacists’ and the actions of fanatical and crazed Islamists the world over. Do the former, however odd or extreme these may be, have a declared agenda to “tread on the necks of infidels” world-wide, and then to carry out such threats?
      One only has to ask what is the common denominator behind the deaths of the 460, and countless others? The answer is so obvious it should hardly need mention

      • Manfarang

        A criminal subclass that has become radicalized by a distorted religion.

  • Martin

    Actually I think its probably too late to ‘make America great again’ just as it is too late to make Britain Great again. God’s hand of judgement can only be withheld for so long and I fear that it has already descended. After all, Romans 1 does depict homosexuality as in the vanguard of that judgement.

    • Inspector General

      Nonsense, Martin, It’s never too late. It can be done, and the way it will be done is to instil hope into their current malaise. When you get hope going, you then explain all the evil inflicted on them by the self interest groups…

      • Martin

        IG

        It isn’t dependent on them, but God.

    • Manfarang

      ‘Make America great again’ is much more ‘Take America back to the 1950s’ when it enjoyed power and prestige. Different world today with China the number two economy and natural gas is cheaper than coal.

      • Martin

        You miss my point.

  • John

    Trump is a global embarrassment and demeans the office of POTUS. Communicating via Twitter sound byte for a man in his position is frankly laughable. He is a Micky Mouse president with zero gravitas in a dysfunctional White House. He is out of his depth, thin skinned, vain, self-absorbed and hilariously lightweight. But he is a lot better than Hillary Clinton would have been.

    • IanCad

      “Trump is a global embarrassment…” To whom??

      • John

        To his ego-inflated self, and to the USA.

        • IanCad

          To become the President one has to have a king-size ego It is not an appointed position. As to him being an embarrassment, I would say he’s doing a middling well job, and most of the criticism directed at him seems almost like gang signalling in its ritual.

      • Manfarang

        Most Americans

    • You misunderstand him. He is communicating with his constituency and they love him for it. He is refusing to abandon those who have always been abandoned by the elected president of both stripes, no matter what they promised on the stump.

      Certainly it is crude and vulgar. But it is deliberate and effective for Trump. It offends our expectations of POTUS only because we have become used to the liberal elitist norm. We too have been manipulated into what we should believe is acceptable. We have lists of what can be said and what can’t be said, what can be done and what can’t be done, what is proper and what isn’t. These lists, stored in our conscience and reasoning, are not the product of refinement and culture but of the success of Political Correctness from kindergarten onwards.

      Our own politicians (though not all, it must be said) are quisling in their attitudes and performance – putting the demands of globalism above their constituents – and always with an eye to their own advantage. Blair developed this into an art form. The Liberal Democrats have taken up the cudgel.

      It is very easy to disparage Trump, to take offence against his pronouncements. One has to be offended to be a proper person these days, of course. A period of silence now would probably be beneficial for all. Beware however of writing off his behaviour as the ranting of a political nitwit. That would be a grave error.

      This is a site with a Christian emphasis. Psalm 2 sums up the state of the world pretty well.

      Psalm 2:1 Why do the nations rage,
      And the people plot a vain thing?
      2 The kings of the earth set themselves,
      And the rulers take counsel together,
      Against the Lord and against His Anointed, saying,
      3 “Let us break Their bonds in pieces
      And cast away Their cords from us.”
      4 He who sits in the heavens shall laugh;
      The Lord shall hold them in derision.

      The Lord used a donkey to do His bidding. He is not beyond using Trump as well. Be careful not to side unwittingly with the kings of the earth. Unfortunately that seems to be the default position for most, including the church.

      • John

        I am not siding with the kings of the earth. I just expect a bit of class and decorum from the office of the President of the USA, not this cringeworthy soap opera.

        • I was not accusing you of siding with the kings of the earth. I was pointing out how the expectation of decorum from Trump has always been a wrong expectation, however disappointing that might be. For the majority of those who elected him he is behaving exactly as they hoped he would. That can be a difficult concept for us to get our heads around.

          If we believe, and I do, that God is the king maker, then our job is to trust Jim and pray for Trump. If on the other hand ……..

      • Hi

        Trump is also a king of this earth and a pretty bad one. Pointing out Trump’s vile and crude conduct to and about women, disabled and minorities isn’t something to be proud of. Nor is it something to do with manipulation or liberal elitism or PC brainwashing . Nor is it fitting for a man in his position to attack everything he doesn’t like as “fake news” and actually even threatening to sack the attorney General on Twitter, announcing policy on Twitter and generally lash out at even allies etc.

        In fact it is called basic decency, that you don’t make crude remarks about being grabbed by the p*ssy or to dismiss someone because of their menstrual cycle, especially if you are POTUS , you don’t demean an office like that with that kind of conduct. This man is no political messiah and his conduct shouldn’t be apologised away to become the new normal.

        • Hannah, you are of course right, but is Trump any cruder with regard to women than say LBJ, Kennedy or Clinton?

          Let me assure you, as much as it pains me to admit it, men say things in the so-called locker room that should never see the light of day, and very few of which pronouncements are true! But are pure bravado.

          Trump cannot be singled out among presidents for his attitude to women, he really can’t. I am not excusing him, but being fair in the assessment of him via a visa his predecessors.

          • James60498 .

            How could LBJ, Kennedy or Clinton be crude with regard to women

            They were/are Democrats. Silly.

          • Haha! Silly me

          • Hi

            Silly you indeed if you think I’m making a partisan point which I wasn’t. Trump is beyond partisan politics . Reagan for example might have run as an outsider and in many ways promised to make America great again , but at least he’d actually had political experience beforehand and actually had a commitment and understanding of his own philosophy & knew that he had to work with that same political establishment to get his policies through. Trump just blunders through Twitter denouncing any one who’s apparently against him and even those that are for him .

          • Anton

            The point is to ignore Twitter and judge him by what he does rather than what he says.

          • Hi

            I’m pleased Cardinal Richelieu in cargo pants has gone. Hopefully the king will listen to his daughter and other moderate courtiers like Dina Powell and Nikki Hayley.

          • IrishNeanderthal

            I feel out of my depth over this issue, but right or wrong about the person, that is such a description.

            However, the main point of this comment is to say that if you want to hear an Israeli-Scottish accent, use iPlayer to catch up on this week’s Nadiya’s British Kitchen. The miller, by the name of Rami Cohen, gets her to mill her own flour which she then uses to bake what may be the world’s first Bengali-Celtic soda bread. About half-way through the half-hour programme.

          • Hi

            I’d not dispute that , but they didn’t go out to make it a virtue of their campaigns did they? To get rapturous applause from his base Trump went on to make it a hallmark to be unnecessarily offensive to people and with some vague notion of making American great again. Any problem was given simplified solutions or none. Hence the chaos in the administration and divisions. When in government it doesn’t seem so easy just to , say, actually use nuclear weapons.

            I think his supporters are going to be bitterly disappointed. You see , I don’t actually think he believes anything of that alternative right or nationalist agenda. He was previously a democrat. I think he said all that he said, because he wanted any way to get elected. The election was like a reality tv game to him. So when his base figure this out them they’ll turn on him , if they haven’t already.

          • Sarky

            Trumps presidency reminds me of the scene in gladiator, when the two senators are discussing how commodus is a crap emperor but he understands the mob and the mob love him for it.
            Trump won’t be done for by the people, but by the political elite who are already sharpening their knives.

          • bluedog

            Without question Trump’s enemies are in Washington, within the Democrats and Republicans. What is interesting is his deliberate use of chaos to create unstructured opportunities that he can exploit. There’s clear pattern emerging.

          • Ivan M

            Trump can modulate his message anyway he wants, according to the needs of the hour. By now everyone knows that Trump does not give a damn about anyone. He doesn’t care for any foreign leader, any local political grandee, has no respect for his enemies and even large parts of his ‘base’. He has as you say found that difficult way through the thicket to get his message across. Bannon has been sent out into the cold. But Bannon outside is far more dangerous to the Republican milksops, than he will ever be to Trump. Trump is safe till the midterm Congressional elections at least, since the forces represented by Bannon will ensure that there is no internal coup to the left of Trump. The Republican cucks, would dearly love to be loved by the Left, but they cannot do it at the expense of their seats. It almost seems that Bannon’s departure was with that in view.

          • And it’s not beyond the realm of possibilities that Bannon has been sent out with Trump’s blessing, to do outside the WH what he couldn’t do from within it. Politics is a strange old game.

          • I’d say, fer sure, John. Keep an eye on the Breitbart online mag as it goes on steroids and the rumoured Breitbart tv coming up…they’ll be scooping the conservative media which has been going wobbly from trying to keep up with the Washington weather vane!

          • Hi

            I shall have to check Breitbart out, never read it. I was recommended the onion by an American friend.

          • Hi back to you!

            The Onion used to be sorta funny, in an old-school, parents kinda humour way, but it’s gotten old. Didn’t read it longer than five minutes to figure what their political shtik is. Breitbart was good, especially with Ben Shapiro (check him out on YouTube) and Milo Yiannopolous at his over-the-top best, and their staff of writers is solid. Things got messed up when Steve Bannon let the alt-right mix in with the off-the rails, probably in the hope of cleaning them up or just getting their votes and turfing them. Now that Bannon’s back, he’ll be getting a serious injection of money from big donors and has already received a wink from Trump who’ll want him to keep Congress and the “West Wing Democrats” (Ivanka and Jared) in line.

            Checked out Breitbart yesterday and the supposedly evil comment crowd is nothing like the lefties claim; a far-right few fringe gorks who get a healthy push-back from a solid majority, and nothing weirder or creepier than we get from Johnnie here or that goofy neo-Nazi chick that seems to have gone way from here. Breitbart just didn’t censor and wasn’t good at PC lingo, as lefties expect and demand. I do hope they add a few more cerebral writers for longer, in-depth pieces for the reading pleasure, a liberal or two for the feeding frenzy and to give the lately wobbly National Review a run for their money.

          • Hi

            Yes I remember that one. Who will be maximus?

          • Sarky

            Got a feeling we’ll know by christmas.

          • Hi

            Like WWI, which one???

          • Unlike the creepy Clinton Kennedy and old Cigar Bill, serious rapists and womanizers, Trump only shoot off his mouth…to useful effect, as he made it clear that he doesn’t give a hoot about the sensitivities of the hated coastal bubbles. Whatever he is or not politically, Miss Hannah, he’ll stay in power as long as he lives up to his promises by shutting down the migrant flood, revving-up the stagnant economy and gelding or crushing the bloated Deep State.

          • Hi

            As I wrote above, I wouldn’t disagree about the sexual affairs of the other presidents. I never really liked any of them to be honest and I don’t get the Kennedy worship. Clinton was political pals with Blair. Enough said before we even think about his liaisons etc.

            My grandmother liked Mr Reagan and Bush , who she thought was very calm and Presidential. Personally as this is likened to a medieval court, Donald could retire and Ivanka Kushner could succeed him. Now that would-be cool.

          • No, it wouldn’t be so cool if you had to live next to the biggest economy and had to share the continent. Our grandkids will be recovering from the mess the Obamamessiah managed to make in 8 years. Ivanka is as flakey a Dem as Hillary, except smarter and prettier.

            PS, if it’s a woman you hope for, and an Anglio-Indian to boot, take a better look at Nikki Haley, the UN embassador. Tough-as-nails, grounded and with a head screwed on right.

          • Hi

            Yes and then that’s the treadu guy . Nikki is brilliant , reminds of an American version of my sister Esther, and as I said to Anton a moderate voice that I hope Trump listens to more often.

          • len

            Trump said it, Clinton did it.

    • bluedog

      As the media is almost completely hostile to Trump, and can be relied upon to misrepresent or ignore anything he says except for carefully edited clips, how else does he communicate with the US electorate? If the media gave Trump a fair hearing, he wouldn’t need Twitter. What clearly infuriates the media is that by his use of Twitter, Trump circumvents them and renders them impotent. Of course, Trump will not be the first politician to use social media to devastating effect, as Macron in France has proved. Somehow Twitter doesn’t quite gel with Theresa.

      • IanCad

        Excellent point bd.

  • Inspector General

    ‘Marxists don’t do democracy’ is an oft thought fundamental aspect of the ideology. You couldn’t be more wrong. Marxists consider democracy as a bedrock of what they are about. In fact, so revered is their democracy that they don’t want to risk anything going wrong with it. That’s why before you can stand, you have to have “the peoples” approval of being worthy to be the peoples’ representative. The best decider of what suits the people is of course the party. The only political party.

    One question then, gentlemen…

    Why is this site suddenly running with the considerable annoyance of Marxist flavoured detractors of President Trump who should damn well know better?

    • Manfarang

      “Marxists consider democracy as a bedrock of what they are about”
      In mainland China? The Yellow Umbrella movement in Hong Kong is strongly resisted.

      • Dominic Stockford

        Yes. Everybody deemed worthy of democracy was allowed to stand, and everybody deemed worthy of democracy got a vote. And everyone deemed worthy of democracy won.

  • Don Benson

    I don’t do Twitter. Life’s far too short for that. So I admire Donald Trump’s selfless expenditure of his latter years on a project which, for most of us, would rival 24/7 root canal treatment. He’s the last best hope for turning the USA back from disaster, and even for him it’s touch-and-go. So I hope his instinct to use Twitter in his own particular style is well founded. He’s certainly exposed the rotten underbelly of his country; the stench is bad enough from here, one can only imagine what the hour by hour reality is like for him.

    But it’s always been my observation that mealy-mouthed people are useless in great enterprises. And God has this unnerving habit of picking out the least likely people when the greatest endeavours are required. Only history will judge the true reality of what is now happening, but few of us can doubt the destructive power of the forces which surround this one fearless man.

    So instead of holding our English noses and shaking our shocked heads in disgust at the whole sordid business, let us surround him with our prayers. If anyone needed God’s wisdom (whether he realises it or not) it’s Donald Trump, the one man in our rotten, decaying Western world who has the sheer guts and energy to try and turn things around.

    • Politically__Incorrect

      Exactly.

    • Anna

      Brilliant post.

  • David

    It seems to me that Trump resorts to addressing the people directly through twitter because the mainstream media simply does not convey anything approaching truth or reality. This is what happens here in the UK and so I assume that they are no better in the US, maybe worse. But I have insufficient knowledge of America to know whether what he says, or how well he says it, is effective for the promotion of truth or the accurate presentation of reality.

  • Hi

    Trump can’t heal American or be a unifying force because his persona is about being the extreme version of the overly confrontational alpha male type, but as important , his campaign was and his administration is about confrontation. You can’t promise to (politically) drain swamps or change things they way Trump and his supporters want and at the same time be some kind of healing and presumably consensus force, for such a promise requires huge confrontation, thereto winners and losers …

    • Inspector General

      Who wants a healing force, Hannah. and you can put consensus in the bin. There’s much to clean up. Yes, there will be winners and losers. How dreadful!

      • Hi Inspector

        I was just pointing out the bloomin obvious that this isn’t Trump and is incompatible with his stated aims.

        The trouble of course is that Trump as POTUS isn’t just a head of government and a political figure, but also a monarch like head of state. Ergo when bad things happen to the nation it’s expected he will be statesmen like and be bipartisan at that time. Bush , Reagan, Obama all managed to do that . Trump either won’t and can’t do that and in a crisis he will only be able to carry his supporters. Or even worse he will use an outside event to try to and artificially unify the country in war, e.g. North Korea (?) .

        • Obama didn’t do any of that, Miss Hannah. Whenever he could, he bloviated the public into a comma, stoked the racial and class divides and sent his corrupt underlings in the Fed departments and courts to harass the Right. All according to the Alinsky handbook pointers, and as his domestic terror friends, rabid church minister and the creepy Valerie Jarrett thing stuck on his shoulder recommended.

          • dannybhoy

            Where’ve you been you old Czech Canuckian?

    • IrishNeanderthal

      Hannah,

      This might explain the reluctance of some people to criticize Trump:

      ‘Peanuts’ Explains Why Conservatives Go Mum On White Supremacy

    • Dominic Stockford

      Trump cannot heal America or be a unifying force because only Jesus Christ can do that. No human can do it. Some might hide the divisions better, but they’d still be there, and all the more dangerous for being hidden in the shadows instead of out in the open where all can see them.

  • Politically__Incorrect

    No man is perfect, and Donald Trump is certainly on a learning a learning curve as POTUS. Yet there is something I find reassuring about him because he is not an establishment career politician. If only we had a PM with his courage. He sees the elephant in the room and tries to do something about it while the other political jobs-worths close their eyes, stick their fingers in their ears and sing “la la la…”.

  • Alas, Your Grace, a period of silence, of “Twitter Trappism,” would “transcend” The Donald to oblivion or at least a steeper slide down the alleged popularity curve by cutting him off from his base and giving his increasingly crazed opponents a free run on their hyperbolic accusations. I suspect that he is engaged in a crude but effective “meme-war” by manufacturing and letting loose spicy little bonbons of conceptual brain-candy to trigger desired associations and responses. We will never know how many votes the Dems lost because folk paired the name “Hillary” with “Crooked,” an apt pairing that worked very well, as it happens to be fundamentally true. And looking at your list of Twitter bonbons, none of them could be said to be entirely devoid of an element of truth.

  • len

    Trump is a thorn in the side of the establishment and Trump uses that thorn to infuriate the lumbering monster which is the establishment pretty much as Nigel Farage does in the EU.
    We need people (like the little boy who spotted’ the Kings clothes’ were actually non existent) who will not conform to what the world wants and to speak the truth as they see it.

  • Anna

    In Trump, the Americans now have a president who is near the end of his working life and – unlike Clinton, Blair, Obama, Osborne and Macron – is doing this job with his legacy rather than a future career and personal enrichment in mind. Although the future prospects of the Trump empire will certainly influence his decisions, he is unlikely to damage his nation’s economy and future, for personal benefit in the way that a leader of moderate means, who is also directly commissioned by Goldman Sachs, is likely to do.

    As for his style… if America succeeds, he will be forgiven all the rude tweets. The tweets will come to be regarded as the mark of his rare genius, ‘immortalised’ in books and studied by future psychology students aiming to analyse his mind or modern mob responses to leaders employing social media. Future American presidential campaigns might even employ ‘experts’ specially trained to ghost tweet for their candidates.

    • As I, once a never-Trumper, said when Trump wiped the floor with seventeen Primaries contenders and whupped Hillary when I woke up in the middle of the vote count: Nothing exceeds like excess.

  • Is Trump’s direct vulgarity and brazen lying better or worse than traditional post-sexual revolution lies that politicians have been telling?

    I think Trump offends the middle class so much because he lies in ways that they don’t like. He offends their sensibilities by the *way* that he lies. The lies of people like Blair, the Clintons, Cameron, Obama, etc., were all told in acceptable ways, and on subjects we didn’t care that much about. And let’s be clear about this: they lied, and lied, and lied. Particularly clearly about the sexual revolution, about abortion, about pushing women into the workplace, about marriage and family, about the likely outcome of uncontrolled immigration without respect to the cultural mores of those migrating, about all number of things.

    I tend to think it’s somewhat telling that we, as societies, have found lies so palatable in recent decades, but that now a particular way of telling them causes so much media upset. We don’t actually dislike lies or lying. As long as they’re our preferred set of lies, and told in the ways we like to hear them, they’re fine. They can involve the never-ending deaths of untold millions of innocents in the womb, and they’re fine. There’s no outrage. We don’t really care about that. But vulgarity of the sort that offends middle class mores? *That*, the media, and we, absolutely cannot put up with. What an awful man!

  • Father David

    You can’t tell me that the Great American Eclipse sweeping across the USA isn’t a sign presaging the eclipse of the Trump Presidency..

    • Anton

      The Great American Eclipse sweeping across the USA isn’t a sign presaging the eclipse of the Trump Presidency.

      • Bwa-hahahahaha! That one actually hurt, Anton. I go away and you still haven’t changed.

        • Anton

          Welcome back!

          • Thank you!

          • Mrs Proudie of Barchester

            And where have you been all this time, dear Avi? You were missed….

          • Thank you Mrs Proudie, and you …the jolly plurality here and you personally… were missed as well. My father passed away somewhat unexpectedly in April, back in the old country where he went to retire. That took the fixed grin off my fair and sonsie face and kind of drained the blogger’s joie de vivre for a while. Recently, His Grace determined that I’ve had enough of loafing about, sent his High Sheriff with a writ of summons for me, and here I am.

    • James60498 .

      I trust you will be demanding another Eclipse if it isn’t.

      • Father David

        And have you noticed that Big Ben has stopped chiming – how spooky is that? What portent does it signify? Obviously it is a sign that Brexit will be disastrous for the U K. I think we ought to keep a close eye on the ravens at the Tower of London.

        • Sarky

          Or the silencing signifies the silencing of the EU voice in our land and the restarting of the bells in four years time will signify our freedom.

          • Father David

            More the silencing of the voice of the U K among the Big Boys of Europe as we head towards becoming a little off shore insignificant island, regarded with suspicion and disdain by our Continental and Irish neighbours . Big Ben is a symbol of London and the nation; it can’t really or easily be connected to the voice of the EU.
            It is often said that we lost an Empire and failed to find a role or an identity in the world. The E U offered a chance to be part of a great united project but one which 52% rejected to the chagrin of the 48% who voted remain. Just as under Trump in America we have the Divided States of America so in our own country we have now sadly become the Disunited Kingdom.

          • bluedog

            ‘…regarded with suspicion and disdain by our Continental and Irish neighbours .’

            If you are a CoE priest or similar it seems likely that your reading is restricted to the Guardian on-line (it’s free) and the New Statesman. In this event you will have missed a number of articles in the quality press suggesting that Ireland may consider leaving the EU itself. These articles either seem to be well-informed or written by a member of the Irish establishment. This being the case, it seems hardly likely that our Irish neighbours really do regard us with suspicion and disdain.

            As for the ‘Continentals’, at least some of them speak sense, in which context Victor Orban of Hungary is outstanding. It does not take too much imagination to envisage the entire Visegrad bloc leaving the EU.

          • Father David

            Having seen the mess and chaos our Three Brexiteers are making of the withdrawal discussions – the other 27 EU nations will think twice about stepping over the cliff and crashing onto the jagged rocks below.
            The Irish are far too canny to contemplate anything as crass as leaving the EU – they know on which side their bread is buttered.

          • Anton

            Look, I salute your taste in fimss but as far as politics go assertion doesn’t make a proposition true.

          • Anton

            The Irish have viewed us with suspicion for a thousand years, and I can’t say I’m surprised. I’d love to know the truth of Laudabiliter.

          • bluedog

            Do you suggest that because the issuing Pope was English, the whole thing was a stitch-up if not actually a forgery? Shame on you if you do!

          • Anton

            I have seen that claim and the fact that an original isn’t to be found in Vatican archives. What I read caused me not to be confident of the truth of the matter. I’d very much like to read some *genuine* scholarship on the subject. If you know where I can find that, I’d be glad of the reference.

          • Sarky

            Apart from a few whingers in London, most people have now accepted it and want to get on with it. Maybe its time you did the same.

          • Father David

            I think you underestimate the opposition to our European suicidal exit. Let’s just wait and see how many “whingers” participate in the People’s March for Europe on September 9th, shall we?

          • bluedog

            Yes, with Palestinian and Rainbow flags bravely fluttering together in the breeze (without a hint of irony), anti-Trump posters at the carry, assorted Green causes being championed by the usual suspects, it’ll be a standard rent-a-mob outing. Oh, they’ll probably remember to bring a few EU flags as well for the evening news close-ups.

          • Sarky

            You forgot the union flags, cant have a pointless march without them.

          • Sarky

            Lets see how many people from outside london participate, shall we?

          • dannybhoy

            A tale of two nations..

          • Sarky

            London is most definately a seperate country.

          • dannybhoy

            I wouldn’t disagree with you there. In fact I can see a day coming when government is moved out of London for security reasons.
            Probably to Norfolk – the county of carrots, pigs and sugar beet.

          • Sarky

            And punch ups in cromer.

          • bluedog

            No, Liverpool is the preferred location for the new federal capital of the re-united British Isles.

          • dannybhoy

            Lovely girl, lousy sloppy song…
            Here’s something really Scouser..
            (the lyrics are very applicable to a move out of Westminster..)

          • bluedog

            Pure femininity.

          • dannybhoy

            Yes but the song,,,,, yeeeeuk!
            I could understand if Anna or Magnolia had posted it, but your girl isn’t even British..

          • Manfarang

            It most definitely is not,

          • Sarky

            How did you cone to that conclusion?? Its residents have views totally at odds with the rest of the country. London is a bubble that doesnt understand or care about the rest of the country.

          • Manfarang

            London Assembly Members
            Labour (12)
            Conservative (8)
            Green (2)
            UKIP (2)
            Liberal Democrats (1)

            Its political makeup is similar to the rest of England

          • Father David

            In which case why are you so Frit of a Second Referendum?

          • bluedog

            Just a second referendum? Why not best of five, like men’s tennis. If we’re going to have more than one, let’s show ’em how to make a mockery of democracy.

          • Sarky

            Because the cost cannot be justified just over a year from when we voted to leave.

          • Father David

            So, you are Frit then!

          • Sarky

            From what I’ve read, you’re the only one frightened.

          • Father David

            No, not in the least frightened but horrified for the future post March 2019.

          • Sarky

            Im excited. It’s a world of opportunities when your hands aren’t tied behind your back.

          • Manfarang

            I seem to remember it was the Leavers who were the ones who started the call for a second referendum.

          • Manfarang

            Third referendum. The first one was in 1975.

          • Father David

            So, It’s One All – let’s have the decider then!

          • Manfarang

            Good idea.

          • Father David

            Indeed so, I’m full of ’em – “Why sometimes I’ve believed as many as six impossible things before breakfast”

          • Father David

            Granted – I can’t see many folk from Sunderland, Hartlepool, Skegness, Boston, Clacton or the Isle of Thanet taking part in the March for Europe but was greatly encouraged that the vote for Ukip dropped dramatically in all of these places at the last General Election, which was also an absolute disaster for Mrs. May.

          • Sarky

            It fell because we left the EU, UKIP became redundant.

          • Manfarang

            Britain is still in the EU.

          • Sarky

            Yep, but we’re demob happy.

          • Manfarang

            I hope the suit fits.
            Meanwhile in other parts of the world economic unions are being formed.

          • Anton

            Let’s not confuse Europe with the EU. The latter didn’t give us Beethoven, Bach, Mozart, Rembrandt, Vermeer, Moliere, Racine, Cervantes, da Vinci, Michelangelo, Titian, and Galileo, did it?

          • Manfarang

            More than a few Brits who live in Spain and didn’t get a vote.

          • Sarky

            Why should they? They live in spain.

          • Manfarang

            Many countries give their citizens who are living abroad a vote- its called democracy.

          • Anton

            Drawing the poison is never a pleasant process but one ends up healthier for it.

          • bluedog

            ‘becoming a little off shore insignificant island…’

            Ever heard of an island that wasn’t offshore?

          • dannybhoy

            Very quick!

          • Anton

            The Continent of Europe.

          • bluedog

            Eurasia is a land-mass; different thing to an island.

          • dannybhoy

            It’s a continent, not an island. My goodness Anton, you do surprise me!

          • Anton

            “Fog in Channel, Continent cut off”.

          • dannybhoy

            Humour too?
            Wonderful!

          • Mrs Proudie of Barchester

            Strictly speaking, it is the continent of Eurasia…

          • dannybhoy

            Yes, I’ll accept that intervention.
            Your starter for 10..

          • Father David

            I’m sure there are thousands of islands in the Pacific Ocean which could easily and correctly be described as off shore. It’s all a matter of proximity and the closer we are to Europe the happier we shall be.

          • bluedog

            Europe is a perpetual source of instability and danger for the people of the British Isles.

          • Manfarang

            Isle of Thanet

          • Father David

            Isle of Dogs

          • bluedog

            Isle de France.

          • Pubcrawler

            Isle of Ely

          • Manfarang

            Isle of dogs

          • Mrs Proudie of Barchester

            As opposed to a little offshore Reichsgau of the mighty EU Empire…

          • Linus

            Which means 4 years of famine and pestilence have settled over the land.

            Good luck. If you make it through, at least you’ll be thinner.

          • Sarky

            Really? Contrary to what the remoaners claimed, we seem to be doing ok.

          • Linus

            You’re still in the EU.

            Remember that in business, most contracts, orders etc run over a time period of a year to two years. You’re still living off deals that were struck before the referendum.

            The real test of the effect of Brexit is to look at deals being struck and plans being laid for the next year to two years. Ask businesses what their foward plans are. You’ll find that most of them are forecasting a very, VERY sharp contraction in business activity. European customers are seeking alternative suppliers within the EU and are not placing orders or signing contracts with British companies.

            Your economy will fall off a cliff, indeed you’re sliding inexorably towards it, but you haven’t yet gone over the edge. It’s just a matter of time though.

          • Anton

            France won’t leave the EU, but the EU might leave France…

          • Linus

            The EU is France. And Germany. And Italy. And the Low Countries. Spain and Portugal are very welcome to stay, as are the Scandinavian countries. Ireland too. Others may come and go. They’re not unwelcome, but they need to understand what membership entails and stick to the agreements they make.

            EU membership may fluctuate. The first rat has jumped overboard, its hysterical and self-involved nature fooling it into believing the ship is sinking. Others may follow, but quite frankly if they do jump, we’ll be well rid of them. Fractious Poles and stubborn Hungarians may do as they please without it making an awful lot of difference to us. The core nations will remain. That’s all that counts.

            That and the fact that the permanently dissatisfied, contrary and self-involved Brits are leaving. What a relief! I’m reliably informed by acquaintances who attend these things that European Council meetings where the Brits are absent go swimmingly. Everyone’s looking forward to the day when you’re gone forever. They may make noises about regretting your departure, but they really can’t wait to see the back of you. Britain is and always has been our adversary, not our friend.

            May 2019 roll around QUICKLY. Once you’re back behind your sea defences taking potshots at anyone who dares to disagree with you, our relationship will revert to its normal state: mutual contempt and distrust. That’s what you’re so nostalgic for. So don’t blame anyone but yourselves when that’s what happens.

          • Anton

            You’re happy we’re leaving and we’re happy we’re leaving, yet you manage to grumble. Quite an achievement!

          • Linus

            Me? Grumble! Not at all. But common decency requires me to point out to you that you’re about to career off a cliff face, a bit like Wile E. Coyote in the Road Runner cartoons.

            Actually, you already have. You’re hanging in mid-air at the moment and all realistic prospect of helping you to safety is gone. But if you react now, we might be able to throw you a rope and save you from the full impact of your fall.

            It’s not certain of course. We’re still discussing amongst ourselves whether letting gravity do its fell work might not be the best solution. But as things stand, even those of us who would much rather see you as a wet stain on the valley floor could still be persuaded to throw you a line, even though it goes against our gut feeling. But that moment won’t last for much longer. At the rate you’re plummeting, you’ll soon be beyond all mortal aid. And as mortal aid is the only kind that exists, this bodes ill for your future health and well-being.

            At the end of the day however, it’s your choice. You jumped. And you’ll fall. We can throw the rope, but only you can catch it. If suicide is what you’re intent on, so be it. You have to take responsibility for your actions and to pretend that your disappearance wouldn’t be more of a boon than a problem would be dishonest. Do as you will. And may your imaginary devil take you.

          • Anton

            I’ll treat your prophecy with the same attitude you treat ours.

          • Linus

            Sigh! Pigeons learn faster than stubborn Pixtians.

            I can repeat myself as often as you like. I do not deal in prophecy. I merely look at a situation and, taking into account the various factors that influence it, judge the likelihood of an end result.

            As for Britain’s economic future, anyone who’s seen the utterly dire state of virtually every British company’s order books can predict with reasonable accuracy the coming fall.

            Be happy! You want it to happen. You want to see your nation plunged into ruin and strife. You don’t care what happens to any of your compatriots as long as the conditions are ripe for mass conversion. So you must be praying for the mother of all depressions.

            When all else fails, the ignorant turn to your sky pixie for salvation. That’s all you care about. You certainly couldn’t give a damn how many millions lose their jobs or even how many of their children starve to death. Indeed the more anguish and woe there is, the happier you’ll be.

            That’s the true Pixtian creed. More worship fodder for the sky pixie no matter what the consequences. Don’t try to deny it. I know you’re praying for your neighbour’s children to waste away to nothing so he’ll see the light. Like Job, he can always have more later, so it will be a price well paid.

          • Anton

            You adhere to sexular humanism.

          • Linus

            Sexular isn’t a word. But if you mean secular then, as always, you are wrong.

            I adhere to no faith, which is how you would like to portray secular humanism. Rather I look at each theory in light of its evidence and judge which of them is more probable.

            I’ve seen no evidence that places the claims of secular humanism beyond doubt. But it’s certainly more plausible than Pixtianity.

            You meanwhile adhere to a faith that welcomes disaster, cataclysm and human misery as conversion opportunities. That’s who you are. You’d rather see children starve than their parents disagree with you.

            And by their love shall ye know them…

          • Anton

            No, you are a sexular humanist and it has its axioms even if you haven’t thought them out properly. At least my faith is clear about what it believes. “Sexular” is inspired by the X in your term for my faith.

          • Manfarang

            If it wasn’t for sex you wouldn’t be here.

          • Anton

            I’d never thought of that. Thank you.

          • bluedog

            ‘Britain is and always has been our adversary, not our friend.’

            953,104

          • Linus

            So what has a Volvo stud bolt (clutch) got to do with anything?

            For a start, it’s European. You should reject it out of hand for that sole reason.

          • bluedog

            Alas, nothing so prosaic.

            953,104 is the current best estimate of the number of men killed or missing from the British Empire during the Great War in defence of France. Then there was WW2, when once again France had to be bailed out at horrific cost.

            There is a strong case for adopting a foreign policy that involves a lower cost in British blood and treasure. After all, if you represent France, you are both ungrateful and entirely undeserving of further sacrifice.

          • Linus

            Correction, 953 104 is the current best estimate of the number of men killed or missing from the British Empire during the Great War in defence of Britain.

            You Brits love to dress up your entirely selfish and self-interested acts as altruism. It’s your national sport. You have to remind everyone of “what you did for them” to try and guilt them into liking you. But we don’t. You’re the fat kid in the playground who can’t get anyone to play with him. That’s why you’re stomping off in a huff to sulk in a corner.

            “You’d be speaking German today if it wasn’t for us!” says the fat jingoistic Brit.

            Rather than English, you mean? Who cares what the foreign language is when it’s foreign, ugly and utilitarian? Geopolitical and economic reality compels us to use English so that’s what we do. Had it compelled us to use German, we would have done that with as good a grace. Better perhaps, considering the sense and logic of the German language.

          • bluedog

            Having made the mistake of signing up for the Entente Cordiale, it wasn’t long before we found that along with the Russian Empire we were being drafted to avenge the humiliation of 1871.

            In one of the most extraordinary episodes of the twentieth century, after the assassination of the Archduke Ferdinand the President of France, Raymond Poincare didn’t stay in Paris monitoring developments, oh no. Poincare cruised in a battleship to St Petersburg to stiffen the Russians and prepare them for mobilisation. He was all at sea for three weeks. The Germans could see what was coming next and called Poincare’s bluff by issuing an ultimatum. War followed as the French had no alternative but to fight, on Germany’s terms.

            Just as in 1870, in 1914 the French were successfully out-manoeuvred by German diplomacy. No doubt it will happen again, but don’t ask us for help when history does repeat. We’re fat ugly and speak a fat, ugly and utilitarian language. How could you debase yourselves by asking for our help?

          • Linus

            Germany is our friend and ally.

            Britain is not.

            If conflict is coming, it won’t be with Germany.

          • bluedog

            Pathetic.

          • Linus

            You are rather, but it’s encouraging to know you’re aware of it.

          • Anton

            That’ll make it easier for us

          • Anton

            You’ve been on this blog four years?

          • dannybhoy

            AC doesn’t charge to join and accepts all sorts…

          • Linus

            And more to come. Get used to lean times for mountebanks and manipulators. They’re here to stay.

          • Anton

            O, the manipulators are in the Bank of England, the Fed and the ECB. We’re all screwed, actually.

          • dannybhoy

            It just seems longer.

        • Anton

          It is the last gasp of EU-driven Health and Safety daft regulations form which we shall soon be free.

        • Anton

          Sell out my toll?

          • Father David

            Excellent Spoonerism – “Tell out my soul” set to a marvellous tune (WOODLANDS) by Walter Greatorex. A modern day Magnificat. Thinking of things campanological – the same tune goes to Peter Baelz’s (former Dean of Durham) hymn “Let bells peal forth, the universal fame”. The tune is so good it could almost be an accompaniment to a second E U anthem alongside Beethoven’s “Ode to Joy” from his Ninth Symphony.

    • Mrs Proudie of Barchester

      No, I can’t…

      • Father David

        Yes, you can
        No, I can’t
        Yes you can

        Anything you can do, I can do better
        I can do anything better than you!

        Ma’am you can be my Ethel Merman to my Ray Middleton or my Betty Hutton to my Howard Keel anyday.

        By the way, do you ever participate in the Barchester Am Dram Society productions or let the Dame borrow your beautiful crinolines for the annual cathedral pantomime?

  • Yeah, true, and that almost makes up for him trying to burry Bibi in the elections with the cheesy get-out-the-Muslim-vote and throwing Israel under the bus on his way out. Almost, but not quite, but seriously, I’ll always consider him a classic rasha, may his name be blotted out, for his parting shots that will cost Israeli lives for decades to come.

  • Dominic Stockford

    “For everything there is a season, and a time for every matter under heaven:

    a time to be born, and a time to die;
    a time to plant, and a time to pluck up what is planted;
    a time to kill, and a time to heal;
    a time to break down, and a time to build up;
    a time to weep, and a time to laugh;
    a time to mourn, and a time to dance;
    a time to cast away stones, and a time to gather stones together;
    a time to embrace, and a time to refrain from embracing;
    a time to seek, and a time to lose;
    a time to keep, and a time to cast away;
    a time to tear, and a time to sew;
    a time to keep silence, and a time to speak;
    a time to love, and a time to hate;
    a time for war, and a time for peace.”

    Trump might be right to speak as he does. He might be wrong. I’m not sure we can judge for certain either way.

    • Linus

      Ah, the Pixspel according to St. Byrds.

      You forgot their second great hit:

      Hey Mister Tambourine Man, play a song for me (expresses the Sky Pixie’s nature as a tupenny ha’penny side show sprite)
      I’m not sleepy and there ain’t no place I’m goin’ to (expresses the fact that only the most vacant can be fooled by him)
      Hey Mister Tambourine Man, play a song for me (see above)
      In the jingle jangle morning, I’ll come followin’ you (expresses the fact that most conversions result from the after-effects of a bad trip)

      So what noxious substance provoked your faith? You’re of a certain age, so I’m assuming it wasn’t a modern designer drug. Something more traditional perhaps. Acid, most probably.

      So you must be familiar with the Pixspel of St. Grace the Slick:

      One pill makes you larger
      And one pill makes you small
      And the ones that mother gives you
      Don’t do anything at all
      Go ask Alice
      When she’s ten feet tall

      • Anton

        You forgot the addition by the Byrds to the words from Ecclesiastes 3 which you quote, and which you would do well to heed:

        Turn! Turn! Turn!

        • Linus

          No, I didn’t forget anything.

          As turn, turn, turn is exactly what Pixtians do all the time, i.e. spin round and round on the same spot, never advancing, ever revolving, constantly repeating the same empty rituals over and over again, I thought you’d take that line for granted and wouldn’t need to be reminded of it.

          • dannybhoy

            Dear Linus,
            Please explain what you mean by ’empty rituals’
            and
            how is ‘spinning around on the same spot’ (I presume you mean our Christian beliefs), any different from an evolutionist who refuses to accept that their explanation of abiogenesis and the diversity of life might not be true?

          • Linus

            Empty ritual?

            How about this?

            Priest: “This is my body!”

            Me: “Your what? No it isn’t. It’s a rather unappetising-looking cracker.”

            Priest: “This is my body!”

            Me: “But how can it be? Bodies are made of flesh, blood and bone. That’s just a slab of compressed and dehydrated wheat powder. Are you saying your god is a gingerbread man?”

            Priest: “This is my body!”

            Me: “Hello, is anyone home or are you a robot programmed to repeat the same meaningless phrase over and over again?”

            Priest: “This is my body!”

            Me: “I see. Well, good day to you then.”

            How’s that for spinning around on the same spot?

            And as for atheists, we don’t “believe” in anything. We examine each theory and accept it as plausible or reject it as nonsense based on the evidence presented to support it. Currently the most plausible theory is the evolutionary model and the Big Bang hypothesis. Show us some solid and verifiable proof for your theory and we’ll be forced to take it a bit more seriously. Keep on repeating “This is my body!” and we’ll keep on dismissing you as lunatics and fanatics.

          • Anton

            Yes the Big Bang, the first scientific theory to speak of the arbitrarily far past, and guess what it says… the universe had a beginning! So, 4000 years after God told us this fact in the Book of Genesis – which stands in stark contrast to many pagan claims that the universe was always here – man figures it out for himself.

          • dannybhoy

            Catholics have their understanding of the Mass – which actually has its origins in Pesach or Passover. The sacrificed passover lamb a remembrance of the blood that was smeared on the Hebrew door frames and lintels so that the Angel of Death would ‘pass over’ them. I may not agree with the interpretation but I respect it.
            I tell you what though Linus, there’s some very educated Catholics who could run intellectual circles around you.
            But perhaps they don’t think it’s worth engaging with you because you are unwilling to consider other people’s viewpoint.
            As regards France there is some Christian outreach going on, but many French people have turned away from any kind of faith.
            https://www.theguardian.com/world/2009/nov/06/france-evangelical-church-growth-religion
            https://www.ywam.org/wp/blog/2016/12/05/pray-for-paris
            The role of Christianity is to be salt and light in the world Linus. You are right to point out where Christians fail to be serious about their faith, to be disciples, but Christianity was never going to be a popular religion to follow anyway..

          • Linus

            And there you go. When presented with strong evidence of the failure of Pixtians to do what their sky pixie demands of them, you tell me I should go looking for them.

            Talk about trying to shift the blame. It isn’t up to non-believers to seek out conversion. It’s up to believers to find them and convince them of their “error”.

            If they’re no more convincing than you, they’ll struggle at their task. The ease with which your attempts are countered is quite ridiculous. “Believe because I believe and a bunch of beardy bigots across the ages have believed.” Not a very convincing argument, is it?

            I assume there must be more intelligent Pixtians out there than you or anyone else on this sorry site.
            If so however, they’re entirely invisible. If your sky pixie exists and wants me to worship him, he’s going to have to throw someone a lot smarter than anyone here in my path. I’m certainly not going to go out of my way to make it easy for him. As all the solid evidence I currently have access to tells me he’s merely a figment of your imagination, why should I bother? To please you?

            You’re barking up the wrong tree, Pixtian. Your pleasure motivates no act of mine. Why do you think I would want to do anything to please you?

            Of course, and so we come back to the core of Pixtian faith: the overinflated ego. I must want to please you because you’re so amazingly wonderful, right?

            Dear oh dear, I suppose with the (compared to newts) complex brain of even the stupidest human comes the danger of crossed wires and gibbering delusion. So much of it resides on this site that one becomes quite inured to the phenomenon.

          • dannybhoy

            “And there you go. When presented with strong evidence of the failure of Pixtians to do what their sky pixie demands of them, you tell me I should go looking for them.”
            Looking for….who?
            “I assume there must be more intelligent Pixtians out there than you or anyone else on this sorry site.”
            And yet, still you linger…. :0)
            Now Anton is one of the brightest blokes on this site. Okay he’s a bit of a sobersides, but a dummy he ain’t.
            Yet instead of engaging with him in reasoned discussion you go on spinning in ever decreasing circles. That’s because you want to cling onto your independence, your distorted view of Christianity. All because you don’t want God to come into your lonely and empty life and turn your world upside down…
            I care about you because God cares, and nothing you say or do can change that. I shall be praying for you tomorrow morning Linus.

          • Linus

            Pray for grammatical enlightenment.

            “Looking for … whom?”

            There you go. I’ve supplied it for you.

            Alléluia ! And his eyes were opened…

          • dannybhoy

            Oooops! Quite right Linus, and thank you for pointing it out.
            Very thoughtful.
            I did remember to pray especially for you this morning.
            Of course you will pour all sorts of scorn on it, I know.
            What else could you do to save face? :0)

          • Linus

            No face needs to be saved.

            In your passive/aggressive little universe, prayer is a weapon that you use to get back at those who flout you. In the real world it’s just mumbo-jumbo.

            Sticks and stones can break my bones but Pixtian mumbo-jumbo can never hurt me. Nor can it do me any good. So if it makes you feel less impotent, pray away. What possible difference can it make to me?

          • Manfarang

            Well you might become a Buddhist.

          • Linus

            Replace one irrelevant and ludicrous religion with another?

            Why?

          • dannybhoy

            And there we go; right on cue!
            Well I do believe that my Father answers prayers because Jesus told us that He does..
            Matthew 6:5-6Revised Standard Version Catholic Edition (RSVCE)
            Concerning Prayer
            5 “And when you pray, you must not be like the hypocrites; for they love to stand and pray in the synagogues and at the street corners, that they may be seen by men. Truly, I say to you, they have their reward. 6 But when you pray, go into your room and shut the door and pray to your Father who is in secret; and your Father who sees in secret will reward you.[a]

            Of course just to please you, God might choose to harden your stubborn heart as He did Pharaoh. But I suspect He will answer in a way that will surprise us all.
            Never try to outguess God!
            Oh and yes I have had lots of answers to prayers in my own life right up to the present day..

          • Linus

            So do the hypocrites just pray in public in synagogues and on street corners, or do they use Internet blogs as well?

            As I’m sure you’re aware, I don’t share your beliefs about prayer. Sky Pixie Junior didn’t tell you anything because you have never met him. All you think you know about him, you gleaned from the Pixiebook. If you want to believe in such fairy tales, that is, of course, your right. As it is mine not to believe in them. If you want to believe that my attitude is down to Sky Pixie Senior’s hardening of my heart, then again, that is your choice. As it is my choice to regard such a belief as stuff and nonsense.

            When all the beliefs of all the people are added up and weighed against each other, the scales tip heavily in my favour. That being the case, although you’re free to believe whatever you want, you can’t impose those beliefs on me. This is why your prayers are a matter of the utmost indifference to me. Pray all you like. You can’t make any of it come true.

          • What a twit you are. Your “empty ritual” is an oxymoron, your example a straw man attack with empty rhetoric. You don’t have to accept the layers of explanations and history and behind a ritual as intrinsically valid to understand its depth. You’re an embarrassment even to intelligent atheists.

          • Linus

            Pixtian ritual has no depth. It’s a one dimensional attempt to hypnotise the masses into worshipping a fake deity. Teaching them to repeat meaningless words by rote is a way of ritualising belief. Anyone with a brain, or even half a brain can recognise that. Which is exactly why you do not.

          • I don’t use my brain except for trips to the corner store. I have a new Samsung 7.

          • Anton

            What’s all this about pixels?

          • Linus

            Pixels are individual believers in the Sky Pixie. You are a pixel. And about as important in the greater scheme of things.

          • Anton

            And also with you

      • dannybhoy

        Been away this weekend, just read the latest stuff on AC; Linus to be exact. Noticed he had one uptick on his response to brother Dominic’s post.
        And who did I guess gave the uptick………?

        • Linus

          Think of us as the voice of the silent majority.

          Someone has to remind you that your bizarre minority beliefs are not shared by the population at large.

          • dannybhoy

            Laugh out loud!
            Linus old chap, I’m a Christian and immensely grateful to be so. I post on a Christian blog.
            Do you not realise that there is something incongruous about an atheist continuing to post on a Christian blog?
            And no, you’re not waving a banner for reason or atheism, because we have Christians here who were atheists or agnostics.
            Also being part of the silent majority often means being part of the majority who are afraid to nail their colours to the mast..
            Social change and improvement never came about by the silent majority but rather through the vociferous minority!

          • Linus

            Well how do you think the LGBT community managed to effect such radical change in such a short time?

            By being one hell of a lot cleverer than Pixtians, that’s for sure.

            Your problem is and has always been that most of your believers are believers by rote who’ve never really thought about what they believe but just believe it because that’s what they’ve always believed. It’s easy to derail them because they sit so lightly on their rails to begin with.

            Of course there are some Pixtians who are clamped tightly to the metal. Whether they’ve thought about what they believe or not, every alternative is rejected out of hand. They tend to be of dogmatic nature and are heavily focused on detail rather than the wider picture. As a result they’re largely immune to persuasion, mainly because they’re deaf to the sound of every voice but their own and those who agree with them.

            They exist – this site is proof enough of that. But as this site demonstrates on a daily basis, there aren’t very many of them. The same 20 voices shout the same thing over and over again, but newcomers are rare, and when they do come, they don’t often stay. You just don’t have the kind of critical mass that can effect real change. Not the least because you’re so divided among yourselves.

            As a minority, or fractious group of disparate minorities, you just don’t have it in you to do what the LGBT community has done. There aren’t enough of you who believe implicitly in what you believe. And you expend all your energy in internecine warfare. Few of you are capable of understanding what it takes to bring your message to the apathetic masses.

            There will be no Pixtian renaissance because Pixtians are incapable of leading one. They’d much rather stay buried in their individual rabbit holes “being right” and hurling condemnation and judgment at all who dare to question their dogmatic certainties.

            To illustrate this point, as I’ve prolonged my vacation to take advantage of Paris being relatively empty in August, I’ve been wandering about the city on various errands and have seen a good cross-section of what it has to offer. I’ve come across many examples of gay culture today: shops, bars, restaurants all displaying the rainbow flag and various proofs of inclusivity and respect for diversity. I haven’t seen a single cross or crucifix or any evidence of a belief in Pixtianity, except of course the various Pixtian symbols affixed to churches, which blend into the background as meaningless architectural detail and express nothing in the way of active faith.

            So where are all the Pixtians getting out there and evangelising the crowd? Where are their professions of faith? Where do they stake their claim as active members of society eager to persuade others of their beliefs?

            Nowhere I can see. Rather they hide away in their temples and churches and remain largely unseen.

            The dichotomy between the tenets of the Pixtian faith, which COMMANDS you to get out there and evangelise the nations, and the reality of your effective invisibility within the society you want to convert says it all. Either you’re not living out your faith as you’re commanded to do, or there are so few of you that no matter how loudly you shout, nobody can hear you.

          • Anton

            You are quite right, many so-called Christians don’t have deep conviction of belief. They pollute the church, and God will push them off the fence. I pray that they will fall the right way, but ultimately that is between them and God. You misunderstand what is going on as failure because you use the world’s criteria, not the Bible’s.

          • Linus

            Whereas your criteria for failure are much simpler. If someone doesn’t agree with you, he has failed. No explanations need be given. You never have to justify yourself. You are the sole arbiter of success and failure because you are you.

            You’re right. By the standards of the world, you are a failure indeed.

          • Anton

            And you *still* do not understand? (Matt 15:16a). My criteria are the Bible’s, not my own.

          • Linus

            No, your criteria are very much your own. They are your own interpretation of the Pixiebook and differ significantly from the interpretations of other Pixtians. If only one interpretation were right, Pixtianity would not be such a divided religion.

            So what is it about your interpretation that makes it better than any other? There can be only one reason. YOU are smarter than everyone else.

            See how it always comes back to self-worship in the end?

          • Anton

            If the Bible is capable of meaning anything then it means nothing. And if it means nothing then you wouldn’t be in such rebellion against it. QED.

          • Linus

            The Pixiebook is nothing more than an historical curiosity. I’m no more in rebellion against it than I am against any other collection of religious texts and myths, like the Quran, the Vedas or the Kojiki.

            What you don’t like is that I’m in rebellion against what you consider as your Sky Pixie-given authority to pronounce upon all things and tell us all how to live our lives. Of course in reality I’m rebelling against nothing because the power you believe you have is a figment of your imagination, and one can’t rebel against a figment. As you have no power over me, it would be more accurate to say that I am debunking your ridiculous mythology rather than rebelling against you.

            Unfortunately there are some poor benighted individuals out there who’ve been raised to take self-important pseudo-intellectual wannabe tyrants like you seriously. The homophobic nonsense you spout still does great harm to many young LGBT people who grow up in families where it’s used as a weapon to humiliate and abuse them. If just one of them reads a comment from me on this site and is encouraged to think there may be a light beyond the tunnel of suffering and self-loathing you want to impose on him, my efforts will not have been in vain.

            It’s for him that I’m here. Not for you, although with your typical self-regarding egotism you assume I can only be here because I’m entranced by the wonder that is you.

            You are not wonderful. You’re a blot on the landscape. Were you all to disappear tomorrow, it wouldn’t be a moment too soon. While that is, unfortunately, highly unlikely, I am encouraged by the thought that you will disappear one day, and your vicious religion will disappear with you. See, there is light at the end of the tunnel after all.

          • Anton

            Your obsession with authority reflects entirely on you. I have the truth but I claim no authority to impose it.

          • Linus

            Wrong verb o holy Anton, prophet of Sky Pixie. “I AM the truth” is what you meant to say. Followed by “and the way and the life”.

            You may be convinced of your own holy rectitude. I am not.

          • Anton

            It is atheists who are their own gods, not Christians.

          • Linus

            Sigh! For someone who claims to be educated enough to work (or at least seek work) in physics, you’re remarkably ignorant.

            Atheists have no gods.

            Gods are mythical omnipotent beings who can do anything. We make no such claims but know only too well how limited and powerless we are.

            See what happens when you keep on chanting one of your mantras and then someone debunks it? “Atheists are their own god!” you parrot over and over again. When proof is supplied that contradicts your statement, you end up looking very, very stupid indeed.

          • Anton

            If you define ‘gods’ in such a way as to conform to your view of things then you are going to win every argument. Inside your own head, that is. But not outside it.

          • Linus

            I see. So your sky pixie is not omnipotent and he can’t do anything.

            What a peculiar kind of god. Why bother worshipping him? Is it just so you have a convenient drawer into which you can stuff your ritualistic O/C tendencies, so to speak?

            That would certainly explain an awful lot about who you are.

          • Linus

            If you want to talk to someone with an authority fetish, go chat up carl jacobs. He’s the one that comes in his panties whenever power and hierarchy are mentioned.

          • Christians have been bullied off the streets.

          • Linus

            Poor little snowflakes! Can’t they handle open disagreement?

            Actually no. What they can’t handle is being laughed at. Public ridicule is never borne well by those who take themselves so seriously, they think they’re prophets for all mankind.

            Let them skulk in the shadows where nobody will laugh at them then. If a few jokes at their expense cause a crisis of faith so great they refuse to obey their sky pixie’s command to evangelise the nations, they can’t have been very committed Pixtians to start with. Not good enough to be martyrs for their faith, at least.

          • They can’t handle being arrested then taken to court and sued at the drop of a hat. We’ve been pushed off the streets by snowflakes like YOU, intolerant, small minded, selfish and petty complaining to the authorities.
            I’d love to see you complain to the authorities about Muslim street preachers you coward.

          • Linus

            The cowards are the Pixtians who snivel whenever anyone objects to their defamatory tirades.

            What better term to describe them than “snowflake”? Unable to bear any kind of opposition, they cry persecution as soon as anyone expresses an opinion that differs from theirs.”

            If this is the best Pixtianity can do, talk of any kind of Pixtian renaissance is utterly laughable. You are not the stuff of which revolutions are made. You’re far too weak, self-indulgent and spoiled.

        • Sarky

          What can i say, he makes me laugh.

      • Anton

        Close to being the greatest pop/rock song of all time, but alcohol rather than anything more exotic was the talented Grace’s bete noir.

        • Linus

          Meh…

          The ramblings of drug-addled hippies have never really popped my cork. I’ll allow that Jefferson Airplane’s music has a certain atmosphere, but it carries too much self-indulgent baggage to rate as truly great. Spoiled children engaging in willful self-destruction do not make great art.

          • Anton

            I think you put too much weight on the lyrics compared to the music and the performance. What do you consider among the finest tracks then?

      • The Duke of Umberland, England

        The fool says in his heart, ‘There is no God.’

        • Linus

          That’s the way to convert someone to the worship of your Sky Pixie. Quote passages at him from the Pixiebook that he regards as badly written fiction.

          You might as well repeat phrases from The Lord of The Rings or The Hobbit for all the effect they’ll have. “In a hole in the ground lived a hobbit…” See, here I am falling to my knees and shaking in an ecstasy of worship of Gandalf, prophet of Ilúvatar.

          Not…

          • The Duke of Umberland, England

            A man can no more diminish God’s glory by refusing to worship Him than a lunatic can put out the sun by scribbling the word ‘darkness’ on the walls of his cell.

            Prof. CS Lewis

          • Linus

            So why does the sky pixie demand adulation and worship, then?

            It’s like food to him, isn’t it?

            Poor chap, he’s been on short commons for some time then. Better pray a bit harder tonight so he can have dessert.

          • The Duke of Umberland, England

            You are fulfilling prophecy without realising you are doing so:

            Know this first of all, that in the last days mockers will come with their mocking, following after their own lusts, and saying, “Where is the promise of His coming? For ever since the fathers fell asleep, all continues just as it was from the beginning of creation.”

            For when they maintain this, it escapes their notice that by the word of God the heavens existed long ago and the earth was formed out of water and by water, through which the world at that time was destroyed, being flooded with water. But the present heavens and earth by His word are being reserved for fire, kept for the day of judgment and destruction of ungodly men.

          • Linus

            That’s right, repeat a longer section of the Pixiebook verbatim and hope that will do the job of converting me, eh?

            If you keep this up, you’ll be forced to recite the whole thing before the week’s out. Which I have no doubt you can do. From memory, probably. That’s what happens when obsessive/compulsives read the same thing over and over and over again. It sticks in the brain.

            Unfortunately for you, once you reach the end of Revelation, you run out of ammunition. What will you fire at me then? Polycarp’s Letter to The Philippians? The Shepherd of Hermas? Mere Christianity by C.S. Lewis? How about The Lion, The Witch and The Wardrobe?

            Read ’em all and yawned most of the way through them. The Lion, The Witch and The Wardrobe was admittedly a ripping yarn but I lost interest when the lion came back to life and I rumbled the thinly veiled allusions to the sky pixie narrative.

            You’ll have to do better than that, I’m afraid. Why are Pixtians so … unimaginative?

          • The Duke of Umberland, England

            I am not seeking to convert you – using you as a tool for projecting messages to the hundreds who come here.

          • Linus

            Preaching to the converted, eh?

          • Shucks, shouldn’t have told him, Duke, now he might balk. We all do that with Linus, and so he’s become the go-to bouncing board here for all of us Proddies, Papists, Yids and Heathens.

          • The Duke of Umberland, England

            That is credible, and I can see why.

            Poor chap seems to believe in a caricature of Judeao-Christianity.

    • Hi

      The wisdom of King Solomon , well cool!

      • Anton

        He should have taken his own advice a bit more often though.

        • Hi

          Well a human being won’t always be a perfect Adonis ….

    • len

      Solomon, the wisest man who ever lived(although wisdom is wasted on some as we see even on this thread) but the faithful continue sowing the Word and some will fall on good ground and that is the thought to keep in mind.

      ‘Above all, you must understand that in the last days scoffers will come, scoffing and following their own evil desires.’ (2 Peter 3:3)

  • Mrs Proudie of Barchester

    Yes, but t is hardly the Gettysburg Address, is it?

    • Hi

      I feel a song coming on, my best friend is from the American south. That history is different because she says that it was nothing to do with slavery or racism , but to defend their bit against the Imperialist Yankee invasion :

      https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=tP65O_2TlNs

  • Where’s Happy Jack?

    • CliveM

      HJ
      Posted a while back to say he’d be off having operations and treatments for side affects caused by his cancer treatment. Although he is still clear of cancer.

      See Linus is still going look at me, me, me!