Mrs Proudie
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Trump wants to drain the swamp, but it’s a stagnant, underground ocean of entrenched corruption

Goodness! The Sapphire Ball at Gatherum Castle in honour of Her Majesty was a splendid affair. We waltzed until the early hours, a whirling, dazzling company, and such finery! The Duke of Omnium explained, sotto voce, that he had invited the Trumps, but unfortunately the Unspeakable Speaker’s little spat put a damper on that. We ladies, hoping to have a chance to meet the lovely Melania and admire whatever creation she was wearing, were most put out. As I remarked to Countess de Courcy, “When exactly did the English become so unpleasant? By what right has this little man taken it upon himself to insult the President of the United States?”

The Countess peered at me through her lorgnette.

“I believe the rot set in with Harold Wilson, given hot air by the Welsh Windbag Kinnock and amplified by the Marxist machinations of Lord Fondlebum of Boy, a man who is to nobility what dung is to caviar. In any case, the Speaker is ruled by his wife, a women with a questionable sense of propriety, known in Parliamentary circles as ‘The Drawbridge’, ever ready to lower herself. I do not accuse, merely observe.”

A wise woman, the Countess.

At the end of the evening, the company raised their glasses as the Duke proposed the loyal toast.

“The Queen!”

I had all on to stop Mr. Slope from taking a bow. Really, he is too much!

Dr. Thorne confessed he has been inundated with instances of sudden illness – headaches and vomiting of a particular savage and peculiar kind. In almost every case, it was brought on by the victim psychologically, most likely to avoid a difficult situation in their lives, a sort of ‘get out’ card. He has named this phenomenon ‘Abbott’s Avoidance Syndrome’, after a certain anti-white political vote-avoider and left-wing love-beast. I cannot imagine to whom he refers, so I leave that one with you, dear friends. Dr. Thorne’s monograph on the subject will be published in The Lancet. Make sure you order a copy.

Sir Abraham Haphazzard had much to say over President Trump’s contretemps with the judge who ruled against the travel ban – the one that isn’t really a travel ban at all but it serves the fake-news narrative of the Left. In Sir Abraham’s opinion, the President is well within his rights to do what he sees fit with regard national security.

“Alas, dear lady,” said Sir Abraham, “Mr. Trump has a fight on his hands. For decades, Marxist termites have nibbled away at the heart of the institutions of the United States. That which appears to be, is not, and hasn’t been for decades. The tentacles of Clintonian evil wriggle and writhe through every state, legislature and court in the land; the poison has spread into every post office, elementary school and university campus. Mr. Trump wants to drain the swamp, but what he hasn’t yet grasped is that the swamp is in reality a stagnant, underground ocean of entrenched corruption.”

At this point I scanned the ballroom, looking for some lighter conversation. Alas, there was only Signora Neroni unattached, and she caught my eye, indicating with her fan that I should join her on the chaise longue.

“My dear Mrs. Proudie, I do believe you have been avoiding me!” she giggled.

“I try, my dear, I try,” I murmured.

“Naughty Mrs. P! Come now, tell me what you think of this Beckham correspondence currently doing the rounds – letters and electronic messages that bemoan the fact he has not been given a knighthood? Such language, such indiscretion!”

“I have no opinion on the matter,” I replied, not having come across this story. There has been nothing in The Jupiter, though they have a track record of erasing events which go against their narrative.

“Well,” said the Signora breathlessly, “I have always had a soft spot for Mr.Beckham, a handsome devil if ever there was, and have admired the way he has given himself to charity over the years.”

“That’s not all he has given himself to,” I replied, remembering a certain Miss Loos.

“Don’t quibble, dear Mrs. P.,” laughed the Signora,” I think Mr. Beckham would make a wonderful knight of the realm.”

Vanity, vanity, all is vanity. They give baubles out to anyone these days.

One cannot end this week without mentioning the passing of the Brexit Bill by 494 votes to 122. The Archdeacon was cock-a-hoop at the news, even managing to say a favourable word about Comrade Corbyn who, for once, backed the government (I shall not repeat what he said about Mr. K. Clarke). I wouldn’t go as far as that, but it is gratifying to know things can now proceed and the ship of state is on course for the open waters of free trade. The Archdeacon thinks we should stop pussyfooting around and declare the British Empire back and ready for business, a bold proclamation of intent with the added advantage of ‘rubbing the Left’s nose in it’.

Well there you are, my ramblings and musings of the week. I must bid you all goodnight. I need to go out and scrape a few barnacles off the deserving poor and distribute my tract, ‘For God’s Sake Pull Yourself Together’, to those less deserving. So, as the steam engine of indifference rides roughshod over the track-bound heroine of third-wave feminism, and the bottomless pit of Christian forgiveness swallows up the machete-wielding, hate-filled ideologues of Satan, it is time to depart. Until next time, be good dear hearts, be good.

  • CliveM

    I cannot believe I am the first to comment. Well done Mrs Proudie, well done. But where is everyone else?

    • Maalaistollo

      Waiting for you to go first, of course.

      • CliveM

        Hmmm, that I doubt!

    • David

      A confession. We overslept this morning, a rare event I proclaim, but you can have the honour of “first comment” each Friday if it pleases you.

    • Mrs Proudie of Barchester

      Those who are first get extra hobnobs…

  • Inspector General

    Dear lady. The Inspectorate asks that Mr Ben Turpin be allowed to address Cranmer’s following concerning a most important matter…

    “Dear fellows who hold Cranmer in high esteem. Near the top of the page is ‘Parish Notices’. Recently pasted up is ‘A note on Advertising’. Do read its message of import. It is easy to miss. The idiot Synge almost did. but he is terribly slow on the uptake as you all know. Ben.”

    • Hi inspector ,

      Nice avatar .Rene from allo , allo was very funny.

      • len

        Think its ‘Ben Turpin’ silent comedy star(about as unlike the Inspector as you can get?).

      • dannybhoy

        This is Rene’s brother..

        • Pubcrawler

          The were from Nancy. Yes, both Nancy boys.

    • dannybhoy

      Thanks Inspector, I have determined on a monthly donation.

    • dannybhoy

      Thanks Ben, I think I shall start making a monthly donation..

  • len

    We have our own ‘swamp’ in the UK but nobody seems to want to drain it?.

    ‘A dossier on paedophiles allegedly associated with the British government was assembled by the British Member of Parliament, Geoffrey Dickens, who handed it to the then Home Secretary, Leon Brittan, in 1984. The whereabouts of the dossier is unknown, along with other files on organised child abuse that had been held by the Home Office(Wicki)

    • Anton

      The attempt to pin it all on the allegations of one man known as ‘Nick’ is absurd.

    • ChaucerChronicle

      It was lost because the officers who are licenced by the State to conceal themselves, would have had one of their principal instruments of coercion snapped in half: blackmail.

    • Mrs Proudie of Barchester

      And that Vaz creature ….urgh

    • 1642+5thMonarchy

      He handed the file to the then Home Secretary Leon Brittan. I wonder why it disappeared?

      • Anton

        I don’t.

        • 1642+5thMonarchy

          Exactly. I was waned about Brittan when a Tory activist 30 years ago.

  • David

    Thank you indeed, Mrs Proudie, for that fine summary of all that is significant over the last week.

    I am sure that the new President will, in four years, make a brave and effective start at purging his country of corruption. If he is re-elected for the second term, the process he started will continue. But as Mrs Proudie says, so deep is the rot, that perhaps another decade of cleansing will be needed to create America anew and reinvigorated.
    But the longest journey always starts with the first step, and the American people have made that first, vital stride when they elected The Donald.

    All things are possible if we put our trust in God.

    • Mrs Proudie of Barchester

      One hopes for the best, of course…

  • Mr. Trump wants to drain the swamp, but what he hasn’t yet grasped is that the swamp is in reality a stagnant, underground ocean of entrenched corruption

    The Donald’s campaign speech in West Palm Beach shows, I think, that he is aware. A few extracts:

    There is nothing the political establishment will not do—no lie that they won’t tell, to hold their prestige and power at your expense. And that’s what’s been happening. The Washington establishment and the financial and media corporations that fund it exist for only one reason: to protect and enrich itself.

    The political establishment that is trying to stop us is the same group responsible for our disastrous trade deals, massive illegal immigration and economic and foreign policies that have bled our country dry.

    Anyone who challenges [the Establishment’s] control is deemed a sexist, a racist, a xenophobe, and morally deformed.

    The central base of world political power is right here in America, and it is our corrupt political establishment that is the greatest power behind the efforts at radical globalization and the disenfranchisement of working people. Their financial resources are virtually unlimited, their political resources are unlimited, their media resources are unmatched, and most importantly, the depth of their immorality is absolutely unlimited.

    • dannybhoy

      @johnny,
      OT.
      I have been musing on that post of yours about “the Jewish people’s malign influence on the world.”
      It occurred to me that you may have covered this topic before; that you were in fact at one time pro-Israel etc. and also that you had lost your faith around about the same time?
      Forgive an old(er) man if I have got that wrong, but a stray memory stirred…

      • ChaucerChronicle

        ‘I have been musing on that post of yours about “the Jewish people’s malign influence on the world.” ‘

        Could you invite him to explain, why they have so many Nobel Prize winners?

        • dannybhoy

          No.This is what we were talking about and I said I had a stinking cold and would get back to him on his views..
          Johnny Rottenborough dannybhoy • 3 days ago
          @ dannybhoy—Auster agrees with you but he then asks, four paragraphs further on, why Jews should want a ‘racially diversified, de-Christianized America’ when American Christians ‘are in fact the Jews’ best friends in the world’. His answer is that Jews are haunted by the fear ‘of what they think the goyim might one day do to them [his emphasis]’, a reference to the Jewish perception of white anti-Semitism.

          Gilad Atzmon, who describes himself as an ex-Jew, quotes some early Zionists in this article, among them Ben Frommer who wrote in 1935, ‘The fact is undeniable that the Jews collectively are unhealthy and neurotic.’ Atzmon himself talks of the Jews’ Pre-Traumatic Stress Disorder. It may be that living in the West has been damaging to Jews. In fact, as Atzmon writes, the early Zionists were convinced that the establishment of a Jewish state ‘would heal the Jews of their symptoms.’ Once they had moved to Israel, of course.

          (Speaker Bercow’s Trump ban is political, but his wig abolition is a greater contempt.)
          Apart from this bias I like many of his posts, and would like to try to understand his pov better..

        • Anton

          Been there, done that, and on this very blog. He reckons that the Nobel committee is under Jewish influence. He didn’t reply when I said that I was a research physicist and could vouch for the merit of the work involved, in that subject at least. Between 1901 and 2007 Jews won 48 of the 181 Nobel Prizes awarded in physics – more than one-quarter, despite comprising 0.2% of the world’s population and perhaps 1% of the population of the developed world at the time.

          • ChaucerChronicle

            Outstanding.

            Truly, outstanding!

          • ChaucerChronicle

            Mr Anton,

            I have been advised by the General himself that Mr Rottenborough is a reasonable fellow.

            I’m confident that he’ll come running along and explain himself in the ‘Headmaster’s Study’.

            You can be sure of that, Mr Anton.

          • Anton

            Johnny loves his England as do I, and he has a fine understanding of the real nature of Islam and of dismal liberal apostate bishops. He and I differ about Jews.

          • Manfarang

            Real nature of Islam eh? Has he lived and worked in the Middle East?

          • Anton

            He knows what the Quran says. Most people who call themselves Muslims are nominal, just like most people who call themselves Christian.

          • Manfarang

            Not in my experience, most Arab Muslims are observant as are the Persians.

          • @ Anton—He reckons

            More accurately, the article ‘Jewish Bias and the Nobel Prize’ reckons. The author cites highly effective Jewish networking and the Swedish character (‘The idea of giving “one Prize to a Jew and one to a Gentile” is highly acceptable to an egalitarian Swede’) as likely explanations for the abnormally large number of Jewish recipients.

            Given your enthusiasm for replying to comments, the only method available to me for bringing a sub-thread to a close is not to reply.

          • Anton

            You posted that before, too. I can speak only for physics but authoritatively for physics, and its Nobel Laureates have won on merit.

          • Dominic Stockford

            They have also produced vast amounts of the drugs used in modern medicine in Modern Israel – without which many of us here would probably be dead.

      • @ dannybhoy—I don’t recollect using the words ‘the Jewish people’s malign influence on the world’ and nor does my computer, which I burden with copies of all my comments. The words do appear, though, in Gerard Menuhin’s Tell the Truth and Shame the Devil, the PDF of which is on my drive. I don’t think ‘the Jewish people’s malign influence on the world’ is the kind of thing I would say but if you could provide chapter and verse…

        I’m all in favour of a Jewish homeland, it’s just a pity it has to be where it is. Germany’s suggestion, Madagascar, would have ruffled far fewer feathers and may have enabled Jews to find some kind of peace. On that latter point, The Wandering Who? by Gilad Atzmon, jazz saxophonist and ex-Jew, looks in some detail at the Jewish character. Complex doesn’t begin to describe it.

        Some are blessed with the gift of faith and some are not. The gift drained away from me over quite a long period, maybe a decade. The loss doesn’t worry me and I still try to abide by Christian principles.

        I hope you’re on the mend.

        • dannybhoy

          “dannybhoy—I don’t recollect using the words ‘the Jewish people’s malign influence on the world’ and nor does my computer, which I burden with copies of all my comments. ”
          I’m a generaliser, and in this case I couldn’t be bothered to find the exact quote, although to my credit I did reproduce your whole comment..
          I knew it wasn’t exact, and I didn’t think it mattered that it wasn’t exact -unless you’re the litigious sort?
          Perhaps to satisfy the pedants amongst us I hould have said ‘Or words to that effect…’
          Ho hummm..
          Anyway, it turns put you have indeed shared some of yourself before, because I now remember some of your thoughts on the State of Israel and loss of faith.
          I do apologise because when a person shares of themselves it is important and to be respected; so in that sense I’m sorry I didn’t retain the information.

          Of course you are also to blame, because in response to my>
          ” It occurred to me that you may have covered this topic before; that you were in fact at one time pro-Israel etc. and also that you had lost your faith around about the same time?”,
          All you needed to say is “Yes I have.”, and saved us both a lot of time.
          (That’s Danny being jovial rather than serious..)
          Thank you for your kind enquiry re health.
          I am over the worst of it although still more wheezy than is socially acceptable, and for that reason I have not accompanied my long suffering wife to this afternoon’s kids’ club, nor shall I be going to a quiz this evening.
          Tomorrow is Rugby with England versus Wales.. We two English people will be more pleased if Wales wins, and whatever happens I shall enjoy either a Speckled Hen or a Bishop’s Finger; depending on how Anglican I am feeling.
          I wish you and yours a good weekend Johnny.
          There is I must say, something rather likeable about you.
          I am fairly sure I told you that I went through twenty years in the wilderness where I rather lost my way spiritually over some doctrinal issues. My subjective experience is that God doesn’t let go of us easily. Whatever it is that takes us away He can sort out. And subjectively again, I don’t believe God cries over our spilt milk. He wants us to give our failings to Him and move on hand in hand…

          • Dominic Stockford

            I will enjoy some Blandford Fly during that particular bout of organised thuggery.

          • dannybhoy

            Blandford Fly? Never heard of it. Are old trousers involved in the brewing process? I forgot to get some Old Hooky. so if I see Bladdered Fly on the shelf I’ll grab a um, bottle..

          • 1642+5thMonarchy

            Oh my word. Cranmer correspondents who have no taste in beer. I must flee…

          • dannybhoy

            Beer snob..

          • 1642+5thMonarchy

            Inside knowledge dear boy.

          • dannybhoy

            Inside trouser leg knowledge you mean.
            A man drinks what tastes good to him and guided by his purse..
            Nuff said.

          • 1642+5thMonarchy

            Of course it’s personally subjective but among the regional brewers most people would put three above other brewers: Tim Taylors, Hook Norton and Harveys, with Fullers in fourth.

          • dannybhoy

            I most like Fullers Timothy Taylors is nice, haven’t tried the other two
            Anyway,what’s wrong with Shepherd Neames?

          • 1642+5thMonarchy

            Bitter and a little sulphurous. Pile it high and flog it cheap bitter.

          • dannybhoy

            I know that brewery very well, drank from their spring water…
            Never noticed the suphurous element. Although on brewing days it was heck of a pong…

          • 1642+5thMonarchy

            To be fair their Whitstable micro-brews are excellent but their Shep’s main beers are poorly regarded in the industry. Adnams is good beer too.

          • dannybhoy

            Now I have tried Adnams and don’t care for it. I think it really is down to what your palate likes. For example I like fizzy water, I like a malty, sharpish taste, with just a hint of sweetness and 4.5% + So Fullers scores highly
            I don’t like a heavy tasting dark beer either. (Snecklifter’s dire)
            Nearly all microbrewery beers are good but expensive. So if you’re on a tight budget like us you look out for bargains.

          • 1642+5thMonarchy

            You’d like Old Hooky and our Red Rye.

          • Pubcrawler

            Who wouldn’t?

          • dannybhoy

            Well I shall give them a go. Today’s another glorious day for the Six Nations!
            So if you like Rugby and you’re patriotic, I wish you and the team(s) you support the very best of health and enjoyment.
            I shall be sitting on the settee with shrieking wife pushing, passing and running with the lads…

          • Anton

            I’m familiar with three of those but I thought Harveys made sherry?

          • 1642+5thMonarchy

            Brewery’s in Lewes. Brewery built by same architect as Hooky, very similar. Good beer.

          • Pubcrawler

            Hmm. Never seen what the fuss is about Timmy Taylors, to be honest. Harveys… *shrug*. I know people from Lewes who rave about it and have personal connections with the brewers (the two may be connected), but nothing I’ve had so far has excited me much. Fullers… meh.

            I have yet to try Hook Norton Oatmeal Stout. Just sayin’…

          • 1642+5thMonarchy

            We don’t bottle the Oatmeal stout (called Merula) but am trying to get the MD to bottle it. To be fair I agree that Tim zTaylors and zHarveys, while god, are overrated but have a huge respect in the industry. Personally after our beers I like Otter Amber, Youngs Bitter and Abbot.

          • Merchantman

            Lysander can be class.

          • Pubcrawler

            You called? Sorry I’m late. Clue’s in the name.

          • Dominic Stockford

            Hall and Woodhouse Brewery, of Blandford Forum, Dorset (where my parents live). Not their best, but jolly good and a cracking name.

            The fly is one from the river that bites some people, but not many – and the bite is a pretty awful nasty thing if you are in the unlucky tiny minority. I am. But the beer is nice!

          • dannybhoy

            Thanks Dommers.

          • Merchantman

            If you get one Fursty Ferret has a nip too I’m told.

        • Anton

          I’m all in favour of a Jewish homeland, it’s just a pity it has to be where it is.

          Take that up with God, Johnny! His prophets speak of a second return to that land from all over the world, not just from Babylon as the first return was (Isaiah 11:11-12).

  • Martin

    Mrs Proudie

    It is good of you to sally forth with this digest of the weeks news. So much better than the grubby sheets of gossip that are distributed to the West of St Pauls.

    • Mrs Proudie of Barchester

      Why thank you dear Martin…

  • ChaucerChronicle

    ‘The Archdeacon thinks we should stop pussyfooting around and declare the British Empire back and ready for business, a bold proclamation of intent with the added advantage of ‘rubbing the Left’s nose in it’.’

    Oh happy days!

    Thank you, Mrs Proudie

    • Manfarang

      “the British Empire back and ready for business”
      The Peoples Army poured across the border, the rain came down, the Governor cried, Prince Charles retreated to the HMY Britannia and the rest put their Hands Up. Surrender!

      • Dominic Stockford

        And Chris Patten spent a lot of effort going round helping people to raise their hands,

        • Manfarang

          He tried to spread democracy there but it was too little too late.

    • dannybhoy

      Do you think we deserve to preside over it old chap? I don’t. I think we should apologise first and see how the those nations respond..

      • Manfarang

        English people are not well liked in places it once controlled.

        • dannybhoy

          I think that rather depends on the English people. Certainly there are ‘ex pats’ who have an over inflated sense of their own superiority, there are English people who think God is one of their number, and there are thuggish ignorant Brits who just lack respect for others..

          • Manfarang

            Blimey that doesn’t leave many.

          • dannybhoy

            If you’re one of their number what does it matter?
            (Danny says modestly)

          • Manfarang

            As where I am has never been colonized I am not one of their number.

          • dannybhoy

            That would explain the weird monicker..
            Listen I have been appalled by some of the stories I have heard from Brits and their treatment of people overseas, it was wrong.
            But let’s not pretend that we are alone in this. I think from what I have read over the years and the people I have talked to, the British have been better than most and nowhere near the worst.
            That’s why I refuse to join in mutual flagellation sessions over slavery.

          • Manfarang

            My father was in India in 1944 and before that my great grandfather. My father was insistent that the Indians were treated fairly (although by then they had been promised independence) He was also in Java in 1946 and he said the Dutch were rough.

          • dannybhoy

            As a callow youth I worked with a much older man who had served with the British Army in India. His attitude towards the Indians was lamentable, But bear in mind this was provincial England in the mid ’60s..
            Slavery for example has always been around, and there was plenty of slave trading taking place between African tribes/nations and Arab traders. We can’t condone it, but neither can we make it a purely Western problem either. In fat it was Evangelical Christians that helped put a stop to it..
            John Newton’s Amazing Grace springs to mind.
            What it really shows is that the countries most influenced by Christianity have proved to be the most morally aware. Christianity is God’s gift to the world.

          • Manfarang

            Slavery in Siam was abolished by King Chulalongkorn.

          • dannybhoy

            Never knew that.

          • Hi Danny

            Never watched “the king and I “, with yul brynner?

          • dannybhoy

            Many times. Brynner gave a great performance, but I don’t remember the scene where he says he is working towards the emancipation of slaves….
            ;0)

          • Hi

            Brynner played king Mongkut, who was Chulalongkorn’s father: Anna was Chulalongkorn’s teacher…

          • dannybhoy

            The boy who wanted to be like his Dad.. I remember now. Thanks Hannah.

          • Dominic Stockford

            Never?! By anyone, ever?!

          • Manfarang

            That is correct. The French tried and failed. It was not colonized because it was a buffer state between the British and the French. Today there is a lot of American influence. I expect Trump will reaffirm the Thai American special relationship to counter mainland China.

          • ChaucerChronicle

            There may be ‘decent English people often Christian’. I’m afraid that the evangelical Steve Chalke has just published a report, In the Name of Love, and he says churches are the “biggest discriminator” who fuel negative attitudes.

            Of the 669,444 signatories who signed the Coalition for Marraige website – his organisation has identified 74% as Christian.

            We don’t know yet, whether he is going to pass on this discovery to the authorities.

            (In all the years I’ve spent attending church the LGBTQIV subject has hardly arisen in conversation (CC)).

          • dannybhoy

            I heard him speak a few times as a young man before he became a personality.
            He has changed a great deal. I’m a supporter of Coalition for Marriage, but that doesn’t make me homophobic..

          • Anton

            Chalke has apostatised.

          • ChaucerChronicle

            His Grace has begun tweeting on the Report by Chalke condeming Christians as the “biggest discriminators”.

          • Anton

            I suspect that His Grace has learnt there is no middle ground in this issue.

          • Merchantman

            Can you show the evidence for him ‘proving’ his collaborative nonsense? How does he know 74% are Christian? Has he got hold of parish/church records?
            Seems his organisation is quite dangerous and threatening if they are collating this sort of register.

        • Mrs Proudie of Barchester

          Like France?

          • Pubcrawler

            Arf! 😀

          • dannybhoy

            Ooh la la!
            Very funny.

          • Politically__Incorrect

            Or London

          • Manfarang

            It was the Norman French that once controlled England. Still we got to keep the Channel Islands or most of them.

          • Pubcrawler

            “It was the Norman French that once controlled England”

            Scandinavian pirates, and but briefly. Aquitaine is a different matter — where, in my experience, the English are well regarded. Especially by the pretty young ladies….

          • Manfarang

            Anyway the Norman French started the process that wrecked the Old English language and started messing up English spelling.

          • Pubcrawler

            As had their Viking cousins a few centuries before. Bloody immigrants, eh?

          • Manfarang

            The Immigrants song

            Ah, ah.
            We come from the land of the ice and snow,
            From the midnight sun where the hot springs flow.
            Hammer of the gods, will drive our ships to new land.
            To fight the hordes, and sing and cry.
            Valhalla I am coming.

            Always sweep with, with threshing oar.
            Our only goal will be the western shore.

            Ah, ah.
            We come from the land of the ice and snow,
            From the midnight sun where the hot springs flow.
            How soft your fields so green. Can whisper tales of gore.
            Of how we calmed the tides of war. We are your over Lords.

            Always sweep with threshing oar, Our only goal will be the western shore.

            So now you’d better stop, and rebuild all your ruins.
            For peace and trust can win the day, despite of all your losing.

            Ooh. Ooh. Ooh. Ooh. Ooh
            Ooh. Ah.

      • Mrs Proudie of Barchester

        I think HMQ would make a superb Queen-Empress

  • Shadrach Fire

    Marvelous Mrs Proudie. Do you think it possible that ‘Abbott’s Avoidance Syndrome’ might enter the oxford dictionary as a recognised and popular expression?

    • IrishNeanderthal

      During Harold Macmillan’s visit to the Soviet Union (Feb — Mar 1959), Nikita Khrushchev refused to accompany him to Kiev “because you’ve insulted me”, adding “and moreover I’ve got the most terrible toothache”.

      There appeared on 1 March a Giles cartoon showing a near empty Soviet classroom with the caption:

      Comrade Krushchev started something, professor. Fifty-six of them can’t come today because they’ve got diplomatic toothache.

      • dannybhoy

        You could write a book; “Weird and Wonderful Facts..”

    • Mrs Proudie of Barchester

      I shall write to the OED and ask…

  • dannybhoy

    “As I remarked to Countess de Courcy, “When exactly did the English become so unpleasant? By what right has this little man taken it upon himself to insult the President of the United States?”

    Exactement. One does not insult one’s friends, especially when sheltering under their ‘umbrella’.

    • ChaucerChronicle

      Superb insight!

      • dannybhoy

        As little Arthur Askey usd to say, “I thank yow.”

    • Mrs Proudie of Barchester

      Indeed, it just beggars belief…

      • dannybhoy

        I forgot to express my thanks for your weekly contribution dear lady..
        (Isn’t it strange to address as ‘dear lady’ someone you rather suspect isn’t?)
        Dopey Danny.

        • Mrs Proudie of Barchester

          We are such stuff as dreams are made on…

          • dannybhoy

            Danny is easily fuddled, and appreciates your skills regardless.
            Your literary skills that is…

          • Mrs Proudie of Barchester

            You silver tongued cavalier, you..

          • dannybhoy

            :0)

        • Are you suggesting she’s cheap?

          • dannybhoy

            I should think she’d be very entertaining and amusing company that’s for sure, and that never comes cheap, Jacky; O no…
            Annyway, here’s a tune just for you and your sweetheart from my favourite group…

    • Anton

      Here’s something from Trump’s side of the fence, a rant at the climate change tocksters:

      http://www.xyz.net.au/dear-climate-alarmists-will-never-forget-forgive/

      I post this for the sheer quality of the rant.

      • dannybhoy

        Thanks for posting that.
        May I ask if you too are anti wind turbine/solar panel/ground pump/ hydro electric, Anton?

        My friend in Adelaide tells me that large scale solar farms are planned for Australia’s desert regions..
        http://www.abc.net.au/news/2015-02-12/queensland-to-house-australias-largest-solar-farm/6089286

        • Dominic Stockford

          Hopefully he is not opposed to such thing but merely realises that they are no answer to the problems of providing consistent and reliable power for people. There is of course, in the UK, also the matter of vested interests held by some in parliament who are, shall we say, hand in hand with the so-called ‘renewable’ energy lobby and manufacturers.

          • dannybhoy

            We have solar panels on our roof. It cost us a fair bit but we are pleased we did it because it is environmentally friendly, doesn’t pollute and brings us in a quarterly income (and we are very grateful to all of you for contributing to it..)
            Climate change is ongoing, perhaps cyclical certainly beyond our control although man’s activities exacerbate it.
            Or would you be happy to see a return to coal powered stations and increased pollution?

          • Anton

            Yes, very. The nasties are scrubbed out pretty well, the new higher-temperature coal power stations get more electricity per ton, and the amount of warming per ton of CO2 is about one-third of what the IPCC say it is. Renewable energy produces it when nature wants, not when we need it, and no form of energy storage on an adequate scale is known to buffer between the two. Direct feed-in of highly variable renewable sources is already causing problems of supply and blackouts in the State of South Australia, and the cost of wind power per kWh is vast compared to coal or gas; pensioners are dying of cold because they haven’t been able to afford their electricity bills for the last few years. wind turbines are a ghastly blot on England’s green and pleasant and we are too far north for solar power to be much good.

          • dannybhoy

            They work fine here, and there’s always windpower, possibly tidal power; and Tesla are busy building batteries that can store solar produced energy that can be used domestically..
            Even if it can’t entirely meet the needs for power, it minimises our dependence on fossil fuels

          • Anton

            Tell the South Australians. If all the Australian States they are the one which has gone in furthest for this trash, and now they can’t rely on their electricity supply any more – even when they borrow some from Victoria next door.

            http://joannenova.com.au/2017/02/its-that-bad-talk-of-declaring-emergencies-and-nationalizing-south-australian-electricity/

          • dannybhoy

            ..”and Tesla are busy building batteries that can store solar produced energy that can be used domestically..”
            https://www.ft.com/content/8d033466-efc2-11e4-ab73-00144feab7de

          • Anton

            They are still a considerable way from doing that without tons of battery in the garden which even then have quite a short lifetime and cost vast amounts. Maybe in a generation (although smart nuclear fusion is a better bet) but power cuts are here now in Adelaide.

          • dannybhoy

            You find the balance between green energy and back up. It’s been said before on this blog. Green energy will evolve Anton.

          • Anton

            It might, but by the time it has done smart nuclear fusion will be available, and before then the new generation of coal and gas power stations is not going to cause us all to fry. I would say Chill Out but the phrase is liable to be misunderstood over this subject.

            Remember, in Adelaide the crisis caused by Green policy is NOW.

          • dannybhoy

            Why would you say Chill Out?

          • Anton

            I suspect you may be in a bit of a tizzy about the global warming stats, which the IPCC exaggerates.

          • dannybhoy

            Please don’t misrepresent my views Anton.
            How on earth you extrapolate from my comments that I might be in ‘a bit of a tizzy’ about global warming stats is beyond me. I never mentioned stats of any kind..

          • Anton

            I apologise. You write as if coal is unacceptable which is the normal mark of such people.

          • dannybhoy

            I only mentioned coal once Anton!
            But thank you for apologising, it is appreciated.
            I sometimes think your energy and enthusiasm for a subject you know well leads you to forget that this is not a specialist blog and attracts people from all backgrounds, and mostly not as learned as you are in your field.

          • dannybhoy

            It will evolve. More ideas will pop up and eventually one will take hold and dominate for a while,

          • 1642+5thMonarchy

            The way ahead is surely small molten salt reactors which reprocess current nuclear waste and aren’t pressurised. Certainly until fusion is cracked.

          • Anton

            The new generation of fission reactors of various design are certainly good things. We need to keep developing everything until clear winners emerge.

            As for fusion, which has an interface with one of my areas of research, magnetic confinement in a torus has been getting bigger and bigger with each generation of test machine, in order to approach the fusion regime, and the next generation is so big that there will be only one, which is being built in the south of France as a world collaboration. But in the last two years a few ideas for truck-sized fusion reactors governed by smarter computers to keep the plasma stable have been proposed. That’s really exciting and worth a punt.

          • 1642+5thMonarchy

            Just let us know ahead of time which companies will hold the patents?

          • Anton

            Not sure about patents but in this country Dave Kingham’s outfit is worth a look

            http://www.tokamakenergy.co.uk

            and in the USA

            http://www.lockheedmartin.co.uk/us/products/compact-fusion.html

          • 1642+5thMonarchy

            Still based on lithium ion technology aren’t they?
            I’ve invested in a US company which has developed a photo-voltaic translucent film which is painted on windows to generate power. Goes into production next year and has 40 patents. The Shard becomes a power station…

          • Anton

            I’ve read about that one. There are plenty of good ideas out there but which one will win is not clear yet. Good luck though.

            PS Do put it on that daft-shaped building in the City that acts as a lens and melts cars…

          • dannybhoy

            Tell me more. I’m wanting to do some modest investing..
            You can always email me if you like through HG..

          • 1642+5thMonarchy

            Solar Window (US, minor exchange) Pure gamble. Make a fortune or lose the lot.

          • dannybhoy

            I shall have a gander, thank you.

          • worrywort

            what is the environmental cost of making these solar panels? and how long does it take for a solar panel to recoup the energy used in its manufacture? I don’t know the answer but I would like to know.

          • dannybhoy

            I found this for you Wart..
            http://info.cat.org.uk/questions/pv/what-energy-and-carbon-payback-time-pv-panels-uk/

            Our panels are supposed to produce electricity for 25 years (although production drops off as they age, but that’s true of all of us).
            All energy production costs a lot of money, doesn’t it.
            For example how much does it cost to build a nuclear power station? Now much does it cost to decommission it? What do you do with the contaminated structure and the land and the spent fuel?
            Oil and coal fuelled power stations also cost serious money to build and maintain.
            So I think the production costs/materials used/effects of manufacture on the environment is a somewhat specious argument.
            Anton probably has more info.
            All I know is that we are learning and discovering all the time. Absolutely anything that helps us live a better quality life and has minimal impact on the environment is wonderfuel.

            I just love this kind of stuff…

          • worrywort

            Thank you. very interesting. Even if they ultimately produce less they at least pay back something.

  • Manfarang

    “Marxist termites have nibbled away at the heart of the institutions of the United States.”
    Maybe the institutions of the Confederate States of America some time ago.
    The rock of the USA, its Constitution, functions as its Deist founding fathers intended.

    • Dominic Stockford

      It isn’t at the moment.

      • Manfarang

        I turn on the TV and what do I hear the White House is considering redrafting the visa executive order.

        • Dominic Stockford

          As is their constitutional right, and indeed, if they see that it is in the interests of defending their country, it is their duty to do so, by that same Constitution.

          • Manfarang

            God Bless America

  • Redrose82

    I wonder if a knighthood had been bestowed upon David Beckham would it have been given as “Services to tattoo parlours”? Talking of the honours system, should the move to oust Bercow be successful, must he be automatically given a peerage? I mean, the thought of Lady Sally Bercow is enough to make one weep.

    • Mrs Proudie of Barchester

      If OBE stood for ‘overblown ego’ it would be eminently suitable for the Unspeakable Dwarf…

      • len

        Obnoxious Beastly Elf?

        • Dominic Stockford

          Old, boring, eejit.

      • Inspector General

        Stands for ‘Other Buggers Efforts’ so they say…

        • Mrs Proudie of Barchester

          Only when awarded to Keirh Vaz, Inspector…

  • Dominic Stockford

    Steve Chalke has outdone even himself with this one. http://www.telegraph.co.uk/science/2017/02/10/church-driving-gay-people-suicide-warns-christian-charity/

    In the annals of attacking the body you claim to be part of, in the name of the liberal pc army, this is simply too much. Time that the Christian church publicly cuts him and his organisation off.

    (Several years back I had the delight of refereeing the football team put out by Oasis in a county cup game – against a bunch of plumbers and builders. The foul abuse poured out of the mouths of one team (not on the pitch mind you) but not the other. One team was very respectful, but not the other. And so on. You don’t need to guess which was which. Talk about a terrible example being given by those representing a body claiming to be transformed by Christ).

    • 1642+5thMonarchy

      Chalke’s in love with himself.

      • Inspector General

        Accurately sums up just about every male black so-called celebrity in the UK…

        • ChaucerChronicle

          It took me a while to get that one!

          • Inspector General

            It’s the rap music you see. Apparently a major part of black youth culture. The teenage negro will sing about slapping his ‘bitch’ around until she’s concussed, and then about trying to murder a policeman, to satisfy his rage. And in this country too! Why arrests have never been made is beyond the Inspector…

            At his age, a fellow was studying for exams. Or is that old hat these days thanks to multiculturalism..

          • Here’s one for you Inspector:

            Had Jack rolling off his seat.

          • dannybhoy

            Still working on it..

    • ChaucerChronicle

      In his Open Church Charter he gurantees ‘that any person, regardless of sexuality or gender identity will find our local church to be a place of welcome, embrace, inclusion, affirmation and sanctuary’.

      However, he doesn’t say how they will recognise a LGBTTVQI person as they walk into church.

      Nor can I find out which churches have signed the Charter. Why the ‘secrecy’?

    • David

      Given that we are constantly being told what a small impact the Church has on contemporary post-Christian society, I struggle to see how he can claim that a high suicide rate amongst same sex attracted people is largely attributable to churches maintaining a traditional stance. The claim defies logic.

      • Dominic Stockford

        That’s a very good point. Which makes his attacks on ‘his own’ church even more ridiculous.

      • IrishNeanderthal

        New Research Debunks The Claim That Your Beliefs Can Kill Gay People

        He concluded that the conclusion of the original study “is so sensitive to subjective measurement decisions [by the authors] as to be rendered unreliable.”

      • Sarky

        Youre probaby right. He’s just jumped on a cause to blow air up his own a##e.

  • bluedog

    Ah, the weekly Proudiegram, the pause that refreshes.

    ‘There has been nothing in The Jupiter, though they have a track record of erasing events which go against their narrative.’ Heavens to Betsy! Should we conclude that The Jupiter has within it the seeds of the BBC and the Manchester Guardian? It would appear so. One would never suspect that within the provincial stupor of Barchester there are keen-minded printers’ apprentices poring over every word written by the late Mr Marx. With their minds so readily colonised, they march forth in pursuit of empire. One fears that the likes of the glittering soiree at Gatherum Castle, of which you write so glowingly, will be threatened at some point in the future by a new breed of leveller. May it not be so.

  • Dreadnaught

    Never thought I’d be saying this, but the BBC produced one outstanding piece of reportage regarding the reality of life in the EU. I reccommend that anyone who missed it should see it before its taken down.
    http://www.bbc.co.uk/iplayer/episode/b08dx4lz/this-world-after-brexit-the-battle-for-europe

    • NortyNina

      It was just a dream you had.

    • 1642+5thMonarchy

      It was excellent and balanced. A real shock.

      • ChaucerChronicle

        Parts of it, so it seemed to me, appeared prophetic.

        Germany cannot continue to bail out: Greece, Italy and eventually France.

        The southern states may well form a loose federation.

        They will need to, by force, stabalise north Africa (Magna Europa)

        Britain, within 24 months, may find that there is no EU left to leave.

        • David

          Predictions of its imminent demise have been issued for at least a decade. Yes it will happen, sometime.
          In the meanwhile we need to leave the slowly sinking ship, before it pulls us down with it. Pumping money into a failing euro could do for us.

          • Royinsouthwest

            There is a saying “the creaking gate lasts longest.” The last two European dictators, Tito and Franco, seemed to spend months on their deathbeds which cannot have been a very pleasant experience for them. In contrast although a few people had predicted the collapse of Communism and the demise of the Soviet Union the speed at which those two things happened took the vast majority of people by surprise.

      • Manfarang

        Next week- the global rise of China.

    • dannybhoy

      On your recommendation I have just watched this on the laptop. It was indeed very good, and I thought it captured the nationalistic moods.I particularly liked Marine Le Pen’s expression “Economic Patriotism.” That in part is what this is all about, and globalism/outsourcing has been a great mistake, The Euro and ‘ein size will fit zem all’ economic model another. Boy are we in for a rough ride…
      Thanks for posting the link Dreadders.

      • Manfarang

        There used to be a Carrefour not far from were I live but not much French stuff in it. Most of what was for sale was locally sourced. Most multinational companies operate in the same way.

        • dannybhoy

          Yeah but you’re a bleedin’ foreigner* and I don’t know where you live anyway -(apart from the fact that wherever it is, it was never considered worth invading).
          Switzerland?
          In light of Marine Le Pen’s expression I would consider myself an economic patriot too.
          We shall be off to France DV in May and I know there are many areas of industrial decrepitude in beautiful northern France. The French are as fed up with globalisation as the rest of us..

          • Manfarang

            It has been invaded. A couple of hundred years ago by the Burmese and in 1941 by the Japanese.
            Standard Charted, the British colonial bank, has sold its retail operations to a Thai bank. So much for being a global player.

          • dannybhoy

            We’re talking Malaya?
            So are you a Brit living –
            Oops now hang on, I seem to remember having a conversation along these lines a while back.
            Was that you?

          • Manfarang

            1941 Southern Thailand but it was part of same Japanese operation. In Malaya it was the ground forces of the British Indian Army that opposed the Japanese.
            In today’s world it is post Brexit Britain that will have to double the amount trade it does with SE Asia to stand any chance of being an economic success.

          • dannybhoy

            I like to think I’m a realistically patriotic Englishman. i.e. acknowledge where your country has failed, make amends if feasible, and try to do better.
            I rather think that arrogance we once displayed has largely gone. I truly hope so.

      • dannybhoy

        What I forgot to say is how come the BBC never did anything like this before then? This was a good balanced and informative programme but slightly depressing because the obvious conclusion to draw is that the BBC is in fact a mouthpiece for the government or political philosophy of the day, and integrity doesn’t come into it.

        • Dreadnaught

          The sad thing is that not everything the EU has done has been negative; in particular preserving the peace between the indigenous nations post WW2.
          When mainstream politicians (if ever) start tackling the issues of cultural surender and abandon political correctness to make clear statements, in the manner of Wilders, there may be hope for us.
          Having said that, if the EU implodes as is likely it will, it would be wise to consider early on, the creation of a new less intrusive body of co-opertion alliances of sovereign European nations.
          The UN as it stands is costly, remote and innefective without drastic reform.

          • dannybhoy

            I agree. The EU was a political attempt to ‘force’ disparate nations to marry each other, and it didn’t work. Had they gone about it by promoting the things that make for compatibility and working together for mutual benefit, whilst respecting national sovereignty and independence, they would have done well.

          • Manfarang

            Luxembourg was a founding member because being part of EEC (and later the EU) protected its independence.

          • Dreadnaught

            And therein lies the major fault. Luxembourg is a joke of a country, smaller than many of our towns. A population of six hundred thousand with far too much influence over 500 million. To make changes requires ALL countries, no matter the size of the electorate, to agree. How could this ever be seen to be democratic?

          • CliveM

            I suppose the argument for it is the same as the argument for the American electoral college.

          • Dreadnaught

            And we know how well that has gone down with the Democrats…

          • carl jacobs

            Politicians love the Electoral College when it benefits them and hate it when it doesn’t. Democrats currently think the President should be elected by the citizens of NYC and Los Angeles.

          • Dreadnaught

            The UK’s unwritten constitution has distinct advantages especially with regard to promotion of democracy, accountability, transparency, and mandate.
            All matters regarding the constitution are addressed by Parliament and deninitely not in the hands of a head of state.
            The government is subject to being dissolved and therefore has to be accountable to parliament.
            Constitutional behavior is guided by this unwritten constitution through conventions, which have led to acts of parliament that mandate the government to resign if it loses after a ‘no confidence’ vote in parliament.
            Had the British public been made aware that a system of governanance that had evolved over a thousand years was to be subordinate to a rigid, bureaucratically driven experiment, they would never have gone along with it.
            The EU should have had structured groups based on the strength of their economies organised in tiers; moving up or down as their economic fortunes dictate.
            It had gone too far, too fast in a dash to create a socialist utopia and ignored history.

          • Dreadnaught

            Mass public demonstrations against an elected President is not the way to go about promoting democracy on the world stage.

          • dannybhoy

            America began as a union of States Clive. Europe did not.

          • Dreadnaught

            Dan, its just too big to ever be democratic or deliver the goods to countries with strong and ancient cultural heritages and widely differing economies.

          • CliveM

            And?

          • Manfarang

            Luxembourg enjoys a gold-plated AAA credit rating, historically low unemployment and low inflation. The financial and industrial sectors make up much of the country’s economy, and its citizens have one of the highest standards of living in the world.
            How can the House of Lords and the first past the post voting system be seen as democratic?

          • Dreadnaught

            You conflate two totally different animals. You could just as well say Judges should be elected and sponsored by big money or political parties. This Country does not do that, but the EU does for all we know, and thats one of the reasons why we wanted out.

            Democratic in one instance refers to the situation of tax-haven Luxembourg that depends totally, on the benificence of the EU for its economy and the largesse of global corporations. Its vote, and of such as Malta or Latvia, as part of the 27 that have to agree to any change or reform of agreements, is equal to that of the UK as I have clearly stated. The poll count is uncomparable.

            The House of Lords as an unelected second chamber is something that Parliament could abolish with the approval of the electorate, but as it holds only a delaying power over the Commons law making, it has no veto over legislation passed by the elected party representatives with a sufficient majority to form a Government.
            I see no good coming from an elected second chamber but major reform is urgently required. A retirement home for failed politicians and corporate bung merchants is what it has become and that has to go and numbers and length of tenure fixed and controlled.

          • Manfarang

            The European Council makes decisions by qualified majority voting.

    • IanCad

      Thanks Dred, You should apply to the BBC for the post of presenter for “Pick of the Week.” If I recall correctly to also gave a link to “Bitter Lake” a few months back.
      I’ve said before that the BBC is a national treasure. Sure, it’s fallen far since Reith but I do not share the view that it should be scrapped.

      • Dreadnaught

        Cheeers IC. I really do need to get out more.

  • If we’re permitted to go off subject, then Jack says this is his kind of priest:

    Interviewer: You say that the Syrian Army protects civilians, yet there are all sorts of reports about war crimes committed by Assad’s forces, such as the bombardments with barrel bombs.

    Father Daniel: “Do you not know that the media coverage on Syria is the biggest media lie of our time? They have sold pure nonsense about Assad: It was actually the rebels who plundered and killed ….. It is the Americans who have a hand in all of this, for pipelines and natural resources in this region and to thwart Putin.”

    Saudi Arabia and Qatar want to establish a Sunni state in Syria, without religious freedom. Therefore, Assad must go ….. Between ordinary Muslims and Christians, there is no problem. It is those radical Islamic, Western-backed rebels who want to massacre us. They are all al Qaeda and IS. There are not any moderate fighters anymore.”

    Interviewer: You once mentioned Hillary Clinton to be a ‘devil in holy water’, because as foreign minister, she deliberately worsened the conflict.

    Father Daniel: “I am happy with Trump. He sees what every normal person understands: That the United States should stop undermining countries which possess natural resources. The Americans’ attempt to impose a unipolar world is the biggest problem. Trump understands that radical Islam is a bigger threat than Russia.

    What do I care whether he occasionally takes off his pants? If Trump practices geopolitics the way he has promised to do so, then the future looks bright. Then it will become similar to Putin’s approach. And hopefully then, there will be a solution for Syria, and peace will return.”

    http://www.globalresearch.ca/the-media-coverage-on-syria-is-the-biggest-media-lie-of-our-time-interview-with-flemish-priest-in-syria/5571199

    • dannybhoy

      Your model priest is saying (with the benefit of being there) what many Christian Americans said about President Trump, that his personal life is deplorably messy, but if he wants to change America for the better, hold your nose and vote Donald..

    • Manfarang

      Putin’s approach is not exactly successful. Cross the border from China to Russia to see how backward Russia is.

    • carl jacobs

      Your priest is not very knowledgeable about geopolitics.

      • Maalaistollo

        But maybe quite knowledgeable about Syria.

        • carl jacobs

          He’s part of the Christian minority in Syria. Of course he would support Assad. But the problem in Syria is not the US destabilizing nations for resources. It’s a bloody process of separating peoples into coherent nations. The US can’t stop it, control it or manage it.

          • Anna

            The priest is Flemish, not Syrian. It has long been felt – at least in the ME – that the only reason for American interference in the region is to gain control of the oil. My own view is that the Saudis control much of the economy in the West, and while they do not openly talk about it, they have been applying pressure on the Western governments to line up with their interests, which is primarily to eradicate all opposition to Sunni rule.

          • carl jacobs

            Where he is from is not nearly as important as where he lives.

            Of course the US is involved in the ME because of oil. If it weren’t for oil the Gulf states would have roughly the same importance as Chad. That’s because the world economy runs on oil. Who do you think would be first in line to beg, plead, and whine at Washington to “do something” if ME oil supplies were threatened. [Cough] Europe. [Cough]

            But that isn’t what’s going on in Syria. The polyglot population from the old Ottoman Empire is coming apart.

          • Anna

            Please read my reply to Happy Jack above. I spent most of my childhood in the ME, and broadly speaking the Christians in Iraq and Syria (even under Assad) were better off than in other parts of the ME.

          • carl jacobs

            Yes, they were. That doesn’t change what I said. The post-WWI ME settlement is coming apart. There will be winners and losers in that process. It’s largely a zero sum game and that is why this war has been so bitter. But there isn’t anything to be done about it from the outside.

            Peace will not come to Syria if only the Americans would get out.

          • Anna

            “Peace will not come to Syria if only the Americans would get out.”

            The Americans ‘going in’ caused much of the destabilisation. Trump seems to understand the ME better than most former US presidents. If the Americans leave Syria today – unlike Iraq a few years ago – there is a chance that things might eventually return to ‘normal’ under Assad, because he has Russian support and to be fair, they seem to be more effective in achieving their goals than the US led coalition.

          • dannybhoy

            I’d agree with that. One can never escape the suspicion that America has interfered in the ME on behalf of the big munitions and avionics companies.
            No Western country can enforce its will on an Islamic nation, and perhaps the movers and shakers in the background never meant them to.

          • CliveM

            America’s problem is that Obama didn’t have a strategy. He felt he had to do something, he just didn’t know what. He was driven by opinion, not by policy.

          • carl jacobs

            The US had to go in sooner or later. There was no way to avoid it. And it wasn’t the US going in that destabilized the region. It was the US pulling out.

            The US created a de facto Shi’a state in Iraq when it overthrew Saddam. The Sunnis rebelled because they feared the consequences. When Obama gave up the fight, a nascent Sunni state was formed in Western Iraq that spread itself into Syria and lead to civil war. That’s what happened.

            Whatever happens in Syria, it is trivial compared to the possibility that was preempted.

          • Anton

            Obama should have backed Assad and be where Putin is now.

          • carl jacobs

            There is a dumb opinion in our DNA that says “The solution to all political problems is more democracy.” One can hope we are wiser now.

          • Ivan M

            Whatever it was just get the hell out. The Americans and their Israeli friends have been selling this nostrum that if it wasn’t for ‘bad Arabs’ peace would descend on the ME. You’ve had more than 15 years to deliver. Clearly you have failed. Just leave.

          • Merchantman

            I wonder what would have happened if Obama had ‘Mandated’ Iraq for a few years more as he should have done instead of running?

          • Hi Carl

            “The polyglot population from the old Ottoman Empire is coming apart.”

            True as, for example , before 1950 about one third of Baghdad was Jewish (more than the current percentage of Jews in New York city)and there’s a particular Aleppo Syrian Jewish prayer book (beautiful to listen to) .Jews were forced out by Arabs because of the creation of Israel ,but that means that the minority left over : Christianity, Kurds and Druze are now the punch bags.

            However, there is also the fact that the borders of the middle east were formed by the French 3rd republic and British Empire . Palestine, Saudi Arabia , Iraq and Syria were artificially created countries or mandates , de facto colonies, carved up out of the Sublime Porte’s imperial dominions and to stop Woody Wilson Blushing the British invented the mandate system .

            The mandate of Palestine was present day Israel, the west bank and Trans Jordan -which should have been the Arab Palestinian state- except that the British in their stupidity , decided to put a client puppet monarchy in control east of the river and called it the Kingdom of Jordan.

          • Anna

            “Jews were forced out by Arabs because of the creation of Israel ,but that means that the minority left over : Christianity, Kurds and Druze are now the punch bags.”

            Even prior to 1948, the Christians were not ‘always’ treated well by the Ottomans. Ever heard of the Armenian genocide? Between 1915 to 1923, 1.5 million Armenian Christians are killed. Hitler is supposed to have said, “Who remembers the Armenians today?” when advised against his course of action against the Jews.

          • Hi Anna,

            Indeed. And yes I’ve heard of this genocide.

            But as you wrote

            “I spent most of my childhood in the ME, and broadly speaking the Christians in Iraq and Syria (even under Assad) were better off than in other parts of the ME.”

            Every so often the rulers of the middle east need scapegoats . Now middle eastern Jews are gone or more accurately mostly concentrated in Israel or elsewhere, unfortunately the Christians , Kurds (who are Muslims, but not Arabs) and other minorities are the ones left in the literal firing line (but not the rabid antisemitic propaganda of most Muslim middle eastern states).

            Incidentally I advocated yonks ago that just as Jews have our state in the middle east, so should Christians and Kurds …and an expeditionary force of a coalition of the civilized world to protect or help the minorities of Iraq and Syria, from ISIS , so they can have their own states and also to airlift as many as we could to the west, if that wasn’t possible .

          • Anna

            “Every so often the rulers of the middle east need scapegoats…”

            Historically, few nations/cultures around the world have been consistently hospitable to minorities or aliens – the attitudes towards minorities or outsiders often swing from kindness and hospitality under enlightened leaders, to indifference or persecution under more tyrannical regimes. As this behaviour is permitted and even encouraged by Islam, the Muslim takeover of the ME has meant diminished status and periods of persecution for Christians who refused to convert. In this context, Christians in Syria and Iraq were able to hold their own, partly because the Muslim communities in these countries have been considerably more tolerant of the Christians in their midst, than the Gulf nations for example.

            So persecution of Christians in the ME is nothing new, nor is it directly linked to the presence or absence of Jews in these countries, as you seem to imply. Of course the support of Israel by many Western ‘Christians’ nations (which I believe is right) or similar actions (the Mohammed cartoons, for example) seen as hostile by Muslims, has resulted in the local Christians being targeted as scapegoats.

          • dannybhoy
          • Anna

            Alarming!

          • 1642+5thMonarchy

            The Gulf States have bought our elite. Simple as that. Started in the sixties. If they dumped their Sterling investments the UK would face a major crisis, as would many other countries. The good news is the low price is forcing them to reduce their UK assets which if it continues should start to undermine their power here.

          • Merchantman

            Remember when they built the Islamic Centre opposite the V & A and who supported it? That told a lot.

      • Yeah, he’s anti-Obama and Clinton. Love the line about Hillary Clinton – a ‘devil in holy water’.

        • carl jacobs

          Obama is to blame for Libya. All he had to do was say “No”. But he believed the hysterical predictions and didn’t want to be the President who did nothing during the next Rwanda.

          Obama is only indirectly responsible for Syria. He gave up the fight in Iraq. But that is what America wanted as well. What has happened in Syria since was not his doing.

          Good thing Hillary lost, though. She was far too interested in Syrian involvement.

          • Who really knows what America gets up to and what its motives are? However, Jack doubts intervention in Libya was solely for humanitarian reasons.

            You’re not denying that America supports Saudi Arabia ambitions over those of Iran and is competing with Russia for regional influence? Syria is caught up in that.

    • Anna

      Unlike in many parts of the ME, in Syria and Iraq (particularly before Saddam), Christians enjoyed a high social standing and freedom to practice their faith. They did not interfere in the national politics or take sides, but were generally content with their circumstances.

    • Ivan M

      So we can conclude definitively that when the Israelis who should know this as well as anyone there, were baying in the manner of wolves for Assad’s blood, in the wake of the alleged chemical attack in Ghouta in 2013, the last thing they had in their minds was the interests of the minorities or even that of the majority of Sunnis in Syria at heart. Fortunately Obama stayed his hand . But when Putin arranged to remove Syria’s stock of chemical weapons there were no shouts of joy from Tel Aviv who previously claimed to live in terror of these types of WMD. Such is the mendacity of the Israelis or more accurately the Zionists.

      • Israel is playing a dangerous game, for sure.

      • Hi

        Nothing to do with the proxy war of Sunnis and Shias / Iran and Saudi then?

      • Most Israelis have a short memory and ignore the hatred and bad intentions of others and so, stupidly care about Syrians. Me, not so much, at least not until they capitulate.

        A barely alive Assad to occupy Hezbollah, related proxies and IS, to suck the resources out of an economically dying Russia and an Iran about to be hit by a train is better than a dead Assad for Israel and the West, which is what matters. So, long live Assad!

    • Father Daniel is an idiot. One hopes so at least, for otherwise he is a pro-Iran, pro-Assad agent, paid-up to keep his semi-witless flock in the belly of the pseudo-secular Muslim beast…a perennial weakness of the Arab arse kissing M.E. Christians clergy.

      Stay focused on the daily developments, Jack. For example, Trump & Team just kicked Putin to the curb, thwarting his clunky plans to lead and use the West’s unhappy Traditionalists, populists and the alt-rights. Milo Y’s flamboyant emergence in the pop media, Steve Bannon as the President’s mysterious adviser and perhaps even General Mattis’ misfortune …among many awesome and wondrous signs…should have been your hint.

      Just look how pissed the Russkies are today; buzzing US ships, skulking at ports and even telling RT to cut out the Trump worship! Too late, baby. On the menu is a US-led alliance between the US, Japan, the UK and Israel, with friendlies like Canada, the Aussies and others following and chirping pleasantly. First thing, to put a stop to Russia’s clumsy scheme, which was to break Europe and NATO with Brexit, to align with Iran to divvy-up the ME. Then, to deal with China and its claims on the important bits of the Pacific. And all this was supposed to happen with a navel-gazing US run by what Big Ivan thought was an isolationist nativist. Instead, Brexit will rouse the EU out of the socialist dream and NATO will fortify with greater commitments from its members. Oops!

      Get real, Dude, and stop this treasonous boot-licking of an Oriental fascist dictatorship which was about to make old Britannia into its bum-buddy save for, once again, Uncle Sam’s smarts and might, not to mention the kindness of the merciful Almighty who looks after silly nitwits like you.

      There are more things in Heaven and earth, Horatio, than are dream’t of in the smoke and vodka-reeking cellars at Russian Television. And unless you have killer dark-net ware and hackers for friends, scrub and reload your PC if you’ve been on “globalresearch” …even moth-eaten old KGB organs still bite! Toodle-loo and shabbat shalom!

  • chefofsinners

    Concerns are growing that Mr Keith Vaz may be lost at sea. He was known to have been disappointed that this week’s housing white paper made no specific mention of how to improve supply in the renting market for boys. This was followed by his entire supply of recreational chemicals washing up on a beach in Norfolk, and then, far away, by the mass beaching of hundreds of blubbery creatures who had lost their sense of direction.

    • Dreadnaught

      If indeed Vaz was lost at sea, locating him would be easy – just follow the oil slick.

      • chefofsinners

        The Vaz whale: rare breed, thought to be related to the species mentioned in the book of Jonah, because it takes every opportunity to swallow a profit.

        • Dreadnaught

          Calm down Dear – calm down – lets not go overboard now,

  • dannybhoy

    I know it’s off topic, but Wales has fought back to end the first half 13:8 against England in Cardiff.
    What team spirit and unity for such a small nation..
    Go Wales!

    • William Lewis

      That was close!

      • dannybhoy

        Indeed William and Dominic, but in light of the world cup it was by no means convincing..
        Eddie Jones is quoted as saying “We used all our get out of jail cards..”
        I shall be venturing out to church this morning to support my wife as she’s leading the family service, and this afternoon it’s France and Scotland..

    • Dominic Stockford

      After a great game the team that scored the most points managed to win.

    • Mrs Proudie of Barchester

      Oh I shouldn’t worry about being off-topic…most of the comments on here are decidedly tangential…

  • Anton

    Fourteen retired liberal Anglican bishops criticise the church’s stance on sexuality ahead of the imminent debate in General Synod

    http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-38940915

    Thank God they are retired.

    • dannybhoy

      But obviously still worth listening to..

    • 1642+5thMonarchy

      I just hope they see their liberal clerical generation passing into retirement and a younger more conservative Scripturally sound generation coming through, and that it’s a cry of despair.

  • IanCad

    “—So, as the steam engine of indifference rides roughshod over the track-bound heroine of third-wave feminism, and the bottomless pit of Christian forgiveness swallows up the machete-wielding, hate-filled ideologues of Satan, it is time to depart. Until next time, be good dear hearts, be good.”
    Thank you Mrs. P. What, with your spirited journals, HG’s commitment to liberty, justice, and faith; Sturdy comments from the flock. All these give hope that freedom shall not perish from the earth.

  • John Main

    Why are so many of the commentators here keen to see the House Of Lords vote the “wrong” way over Brexit and hence bring about their abolition?

    Can’t they see that any replacement body will simply mirror or mimic the values and attitudes of the House Of Commons? The HOC will inevitably come to represent the wishes of the immigrant population as remorseless demographics cause that population to increase year-on-year as a percentage of the whole. To take just one example from last week; who stands to benefit most from concreting over the Green Belt?

    Any replacement for the HOL will inevitably be forced to prioritise the same multi-culti pro-immigration policies of the HOC. Allowing the Lords and Bishops a free vote on Brexit seems to me to be a small price to pay when compared to the alternative.

    • Agree entirely. What does need to happen though is a polling of all the unworthy…by that I mean all of Blair’s, Brown’s and Cameron’s additions…or at least extreme vetting of those joining the HOL in the last two decades and ousting of those not befitting.

      • Aran’Gar

        If I may proffer a modest suggestion?

        Get rid of all the life peers and let the heriditaries be the only Lords Temporal.

        And basically reverse every change up to and including 1911 while we are at it.

    • Paul Greenwood

      Sir Edward Grey had a Preface in the 1911 Parliament Act which has still not been honoured. Only hereditary peers may elect members of the Upper House ! It cannot block a Money Bill which is absurd if you need to control The Executive. An elected Upper House with 2 Members from each County

    • The irony being, though, that the HOL is gunning for a result which will kick open the creaky old water gate to the migrant deluge. A classic ‘twixt the devil and the deep blue sea, no?

  • “…a wom(a)n with a questionable sense of propriety, known in Parliamentary circles as ‘The Drawbridge’, ever ready to lower herself. I do not accuse, merely observe.”

    Ambushed by yet another coffee-splurting chortle, Lady Barchester. I will have to review my safety protocols for whenever I audit your missives, Madam.

  • On this subject, Mrs P, if you were to spend an entertaining hour and a half of viewing Trump’s Thursday’s White House press conference, you might agree that it is sheer terror, rather than claims of principle, which motivates your Speaker’s apparent snubbing of the American.