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“We traditionalists have kept our finger in the dyke for long enough…”

Goodness! There has been so much rain over the last few days that Barchester has almost become an island, cut off from the rest of humanity. We discovered the Palace roof is not as water-tight as we thought, and in the long gallery all one can hear are noisy drips… but enough of Mr. Slope and his fellow curates.

There seems to have been plenty of leaks coming out of the White House, with the new communications wallah, Mr. Scaramouche, threatening retribution left, right and centre. Quite right – one can do without tittle-tattle when there are bigger lies to spin and sell to the public. This morning, according to The Jupiter, we learn the Senate has rejected the bill bringing Trump-U-Like-Care into being, which must be a terrible disappointment for the President. One vote was all it took to bring this defeat about – the vote of Senator John McCain, the inventor of the oven chip which I believe are known in the United States as ‘Freedom Fries’. It also appears Mr. Trumpet’s administration is riddled with double-agents and saboteurs, men who remain secretly loyal to the Hildabeast and all her works, ready to plunge the dagger deep into the rhino-hide of The Donald as soon as the Ides of March come round. Perhaps we should send Jeremy Hunt to Washington, not so much to help out as to be rid.

But what of the poor, huddled masses without access to medication? I mentioned my concern to Dr. Thorne when he came back from providing outdoor relief. Well, someone has to do it, and he does look fetching in his gabardine mac and bicycle-clips.

“Let nature take its course, Madam,” he replied, which seemed a little harsh.

“As it did in Ireland when the potatoes failed, doctor?” I replied, thinking once again of Senator McCain.

“Ah, but that’s the beauty of population replacement,” he said enthusiastically. “When one crop fails, simply re-seed. This policy is being currently pursued with vigour by several Western governments, with considerable success.”

Indeed it is.

The Lobster Quadrille that is Brexit seems to be out of step with the rest of the country. Here in Barchester the mood is best summed up as ‘For heaven’s sake, get on with it!’. That Mr. Hammond-Organ is a slippery fish, like the rest of the basket (which, of course, rots from the head) is common knowledge. The Archdeacon, as usual, has much to say.

“Why is it that politicians make much of ‘listening’ when it is a small, and often bizarre minority doing the shouting, and then dismiss the wishes of the country in a referendum? Who the dickens are these self-identifying poseurs hell bent on pulling civilisation down into the mire with their gender-fluidity, quinoa face-masks and dungaree-wearing lifestyles? Having said that, why give the vote to the Common Man when he thinks Comrade Corbynov is the answer to his prayers?”

“I think it is called democracy, Archdeacon.”  It was a foolhardy intervention.

“Democracy?” he thundered. “It is no such thing, Madam! It is the tail wagging the dog, the carriage pulling the horse. And as for the tongue-twisted oil-slick chancers who wheedle their way into Westmonster in order to climb the greasy pole and sell their souls to Mrs. Merkel for a mess of pottage and the negatives of their lost weekend in Hamburg, fie on them I say… fie!”

There’s no reasoning with him when he is in a temper, so I made my way to the tiny medieval church of St. Schismatica and All Souls on Ganderbody Lane, where Mr. Slope was preaching to the Barchester Society of the Friends of the Prayer Book on the subject of unity. It was not going well. It was inadvisable of Mr. Slope to advocate ‘embracing the rainbow of modernity’ to such a gathering, and positively suicidal when he called them ‘antediluvian homophobes of the first order’ for not ‘getting with the programme’. Shouts of heresy came from the congregation as hymnals and kneelers began flying.

“We must all come together,” cried the hapless Slope as a strategically propelled statuette of St. Esther of the Childline whizzed past his left ear.

“You filthy beast!” yelled Mrs. Quiverfull, whom I spotted on the second pew from the front. Mr. Slope, realising all was lost, hastily retreated to the vestry and bolted the door.

Lessons have indeed been learned. Anglicanism seems destined not to reconcile the Ancient and the Modern. Something has to give.

My Lord the Bishop looked sad when I reported back to him.

“I fear you are right, my dear. We traditionalists have kept our finger in the dyke for long enough, and her waters have finally broken. Do we go with the flow towards the waterfall of apostasy or board the Ark of Sanity and sail in the opposite direction?”

“All one needs to do is to consult one’s moral compass,” I replied.

“Do we still have one?” asked my Lord.

“I think Gordon Brown ran off with it.”

So, as the parrot of political correctness called Justine Greening asks the immortal question, “Where’s the soap?”, and the doyen of fake news Piers Morgan replies, “Yes it does, doesn’t it!”, I must bid you adieu. Until next time, dear hearts…

  • michaelkx

    Mr. Slope would not be the antichrist by any chance? if not who is??

    • Father David

      The Donald, of course, looks to me as though he has had all his chips and will soon be mashed.

      • Manfarang

        “had all his chips”- the Donald eats crisps?

        • Father David

          But don’t our American cousins in the colonies refer to potato crisps as chips?
          Personally, I was thinking more of gambling chips – the sort that they use in casinos.

          • Manfarang

            Yes indeed. Your word mashed had me thinking of potatoes. Maybe I will have some hash browns for breakfast tomorrow.
            Donald’s father once bought lots of chips to prevent one of Donald’s casinos from going under.

  • disqus_N9Jawtu8Uw

    Perfect words:

    “….“Why is it that politicians make much of ‘listening’ when it is a small, and often bizarre minority doing the shouting, and then dismiss the wishes of the country in a referendum? Who the dickens are these self-identifying poseurs hell bent on pulling civilisation down into the mire with their gender-fluidity, quinoa face-masks and dungaree-wearing lifestyles? Having said that, why give the vote to the Common Man when he thinks Comrade Corbynov is the answer to his prayers?”….”

    and …..“I fear you are right, my dear. We traditionalists have kept our finger in the dyke for long enough, and her waters have finally broken. Do we go with the flow towards the waterfall of apostasy or board the Ark of Sanity and sail in the opposite direction?”
    “All one needs to do is to consult one’s moral compass,” I replied.

  • TropicalAnglican

    Right, this will make your day, I know it will!:

    Hillary Clinton’s latest book is due to be published in September. Her publisher is appealing for help to improve on the title:

    http://www.redstate.com/kiradavis/2017/07/27/hillarys-book-title-turns-hilarious-hashtag-game/

    Send in your suggestions!

    P.S. My own contributions are:

    1. “What happened?” — “Nurse, she has come round!”
    2. “What happened?” — “Before November 8, you were lost. After November 8, you lost.”

    • Ray Spring

      The Communists did it. Those Russians infiltrated the Democrat Party and voted for Hilary to run for President. It took effort, but boy, were they successful.
      Naturally the whole of the American establishment are furious about the Russian interference.
      WORSE, when it was obvious that Hilary had lost, the Russians stopped the Democrats dumping her.

    • Anton

      “House of Cards – I got Trumped”

  • Gregory Morris

    The old jokes are the best ones, Mrs P.

    • Mrs Proudie of Barchester

      I know, dear Gregory, and it was a bit cheesy, but it just seemed to fit in so well I couldn’t resist using it.

  • Father David

    Methinks that “hymnals and hassocks” would have been more alliterative than “hymnals and kneelers”
    In a Dictionary that I own “Hassocks” is defined thus:-
    “A mild expletive for ladies, when ‘Botheration!’ won’t quite do.”
    Indeed, dear lady, you could do worse than to re-brand your much admired and greatly looked forward to, weekly blog as – “Hassocks”

    • Mrs Proudie of Barchester

      Yes, hassocks would have worked beautifully, but in our church they are known as kneelers, so that’s what I used. I do like the alliterative though…most pleasing to the ear.

  • Manfarang
    • IrishNeanderthal

      As a chapter in Winnie Ille Pu begins:

      Pluebat et pluebat et pluebat.

      • Manfarang

        The summers in England in the 1920s were very wet.

        • Anton

          How ever did we invent cricket?

          • Manfarang

            The origin of cricket is unknown. There is a consensus of expert opinion that it was probably created during Saxon or Norman times by children living in the Weald, an area of dense woodlands and clearings in south-east England that lies across Kent and Sussex.
            So maybe in the 100 Aker Wood after all.

          • Anton

            No, there is no such consensus about the date, although the Weald is indeed the likely starting place. A court case heard in Guildford in the late 16th century, about whether a plot of land was public or private, called a witness who said that he remembered playing cricket there when a boy at the local grammar school, taking the earliest reliable date for cricket to the middle of that century. A German academic called Heiner Gilmeister claims that it came across with Flemish weavers; having read plenty about the origins of the game I regard his theory as better than most, but still fairly unlikely.

            I expect you will appreciate the suggestion that cricket is not originally English. You might also like the fact that it grew in popularity during the 18th century when aristocrats raised teams of their own to play each other for wagers, and bribery of the players was rife. From this standpoint the entire corinthian/Victorian idealistic golden age of cricket was an aberration, and recent bribery scandals are merely a reversion to the roots of the game.

          • Manfarang

            The game, 1590s, apparently from Old French criquet “goal post, stick,” perhaps from Middle Dutch/Middle Flemish cricke “stick, staff,” perhaps from the same root as crutch. Sense of “fair play” is first recorded 1851, on notion of “cricket as it should be played.”

            I can assure you I have never bet or placed a wager. Huguenot origin and all that.

          • Anton

            A close relative placed a bet for the only time in her life, during the 1977 Headingley Test Match, that Geoff Boycott, having scored 99 first-class centuries, would make his 100th during this match at his home ground. He did.

          • Manfarang

            Jammy

          • Anton

            Not if you knew Boycott

          • Anton

            Gray of Gray-Nicolls was indeed in the sports equipment business more than 150 years ago, but he began by making rackets and neither the Gray-Nicolls webpage on the company’s history nor Wikipedia is clear when it started making cricket bats. Nicolls did so in the 1870s but didn’t merge with Gray until the 20th century.

          • Merchantman

            Something to do with the slope at Lords, perhaps?

          • Anton

            Mr Slope is on the side of right-handed batsmen who play the square cut at the Pavilion end.

  • len

    Scaramanger in the White House?. The plot thickens.

  • Senator John McCain features in a Ben Garrison cartoon depicting various enemies of the American people in their natural habitat. Garrison provides a potted biography of McCain here.

    • dannybhoy

      John McCain seems to be accorded reverence and respect on the basis of his (disputed) Viet Nam experience.. From what I have read of him he seems to be a contrarian and a bit of a nutter -which everybody overlooks because of his Viet Nam experience..
      I think American politics would be better off if he retired and instead toured the country talking about…..his Viet Nam experience.

    • Anton

      According to Wikipedia McCain’s jet was on one side of the Forrestal’s flight deck and the incident began when a rocket accidentally launched from the other side hit the plane next to his.

      https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/1967_USS_Forrestal_fire

      McCain managed to get out of his plane. As for what he did next, I would be surprised if pilots are trained to be part of the fire drill routine.

      There were multiple witnesses and I don’t think Garrison’s information can be accurate.

      • dannybhoy

        “McCain, who fell into enemy hands after his plane was shot down in 1967, has frequently referred to being tortured and has cited his experiences as a reason for vigorously opposing the endorsement by the Bush administration of the use of techniques such as “water-boarding” on terrorist suspects.”

        https://www.theguardian.com/world/2008/oct/14/uselections2008-johnmccain

        • Manfarang

          I remember seeing what was left of the Hanoi Hilton. in 1997.

          • dannybhoy

            That was a terrible and as far as I understand it, ‘political’ war. It is said that the Americans could have crushed North VietNam if they had really wanted to.
            I don’t think I could blame young Americans for avoiding the draft…

          • Manfarang

            I knew a lot of the GI Vietnam vets including a B52 pilot who subsequently lived in Thailand. Britain did well to keep out of it.
            The Chinese would never have allowed an American occupation of the North.
            Neither would the local population have welcomed them.

          • carl jacobs

            All wars are political.

            I don’t think I could blame young Americans for avoiding the draft…

            I can.

          • dannybhoy

            Cool.
            As I understand it all societies have an elite who lead and rule over them.
            The qualities required to be a member or leader of that elite may vary from culture to culture, but in this instance the USA was not under direct threat from Viet Nam; it was a case of Communist China seeking to extend its influence throughout Asia.
            The USA despite all its vaunted military might ended up being kicked out of South Viet Nam at the official cost of 58,220 U.S. young lives.
            Now America builds its iPhones and computers in Chinese factories…

          • carl jacobs

            None of which has a goddammed thing to do with dodging the draft. And I am acutely aware of the cost of the Vietnam war since my older brother had the good fortune to get shot there.

          • dannybhoy

            Of course I am sorry that your brother got shot, but it doesn’t change the problem of when a government commands its young people to go fight a war against a people who had already proved it was ready to fight for its freedom from the French colonialists..
            https://history.state.gov/milestones/1953-1960/dien-bien-phu
            As a Christian you must surely agree with me that an advanced society has the right to fight for independence.
            Indo China had that right, didn’t it?

          • carl jacobs

            I don’t care a tinker’s dam about the politics behind that war. I care that the US Gov’t committed its sons to war, and then abandoned the dead in the field, and then blamed the survivors for the defeat. I care that the draft was structured to protect the sons of privilege from fighting where “privilege” is defined as Middle Class and above. And I care bitterly that the war was retroactively delegitimized to salve the consciences of those who wouldn’t fight. As in “Either I’m a coward or they’re murderers, so they must be murderers.”

            They hid in Canada. They hid behind deferments. Their lives were far too important to risk in Vietnam. So they ensconced themselves in the economy and did quite well for themselves. And 30 years later, they said “We didn’t treat those guys so well.” Suddenly they want to honor the Vietnam Vets. Maybe the image of a white feather in the mirror became too much. But it’s too late. It’s too f___ing late.

          • dannybhoy

            So it was a political war rather than a just war? I hear your passion, but there’s al the difference in the world between say the second world war and the Viet Nam war.
            So on that basis I can well understand why young Americans wanted to avoid the draft. I don’t excuse the offspring of the wealthy and political leadership. Shame on their fathers for executing a war of hubris rather than righteousness. But I can’t blame young Americans who saw through the hypocrisy of their politicians…

          • carl jacobs

            I can well understand…

            It’s nice you can understand. I can’t. You don’t get to qualify the obligations of citizenship like that. It’s not a matter of “I’ll fight but only if I agree.” Every person who ran put someone else in the crosshairs. They as much as said “Don’t send me. Send him!” What do we call that attitude?

            Scratch a draft dodger, and you will find a coward. Every time.

          • dannybhoy

            “Scratch a draft dodger, and you will find a coward. Every time.”
            Rubbish Carl.
            Is a man who recognises he has no chance against a hulking brute who wants to rob him of his valuables a coward because he decides to leg it instead?
            Of course not. Government is there to seek the best for the country they represent.
            When they start doing underhand deals with governments who wish them nothing but harm they are traitors..

          • carl jacobs

            No, but then your hypothetical mugging victim wouldn’t be dodging the draft. He would be fleeing from a mugger. What has this do with anything? Your metaphor is so far off the mark, I’m not even sure how else to respond to it. Are you seriously suggesting the US didn’t have a chance in Vietnam and therefore people were justified in dodging the draft? Then you know nothing about the war.

          • dannybhoy

            No, I’m saying that intelligent young men (and women) realised that this was not a just war but a political war and that to lay down their lives for their country (which was not in imminent danger anyway) was a waste.
            Remember the conscientious objectors or World Wars I and II?
            https://www.theguardian.com/world/2009/sep/07/british-conscientious-objectors-second-world-war

          • carl jacobs

            intelligent young men

            I see. As opposed to those stupid people who went. I get it now. Wouldn’t want to waste the lives of the best and brightest.

            realised that this was not a just war but a political war

            There is no such thing as a non-political war, so your distinction is meaningless. The only legal difference between World War II and Vietnam is that Johnson refused to ask for a declaration of war in 1964. He was afraid it would f___ up his Great Society programs to focus the country on a war. So he got a resolution instead. If Johnson had sought and received a declaration of war (which he would have received), would that make a difference to you? I suspect not. Even so, the duly elected and authorized Gov’t of the US sent this country to war. Private citizens do not have standing to say “Wait! I disagree so I am going to opt out.”

            You talk about COs. A few comments. If a man politically objects, says I will not serve, and accepts the legal consequences for doing so then I can respect that man. If his objection is instead rooted in some form of pacifism, then he fights or he goes to prison forever. I have no use for pacifism.

            For the record, I do not consider the Vietnam War to have been a unjust war. Policy differences (and all discussion about whether a war is just are policy discussions) don’t allow people to selectively decide to obey the law.

          • dannybhoy

            “I see. As opposed to those stupid people who went. I get it now. Wouldn’t want to waste the lives of the best and brightest.”
            I knew you would pick up on that, but isn’t it a fact Carl that society is made up of the brightest and the dimmest and that society rewards them accordingly?
            It does, doesn’t it?
            Be honest. Aspirational parents want their kids to go to the best schools so that their kids may get good grades and thus qualify for the best paid and/or most influential positions.
            Does society really regard all its citizens of equal value?
            I don’t think so.

          • carl jacobs

            Strange. I never thought that the best and the brightest would be known by the yellow stripe on their backs.

          • dannybhoy

            Erm, I have personally done a few brave things in my life like rescuing a couple of people from a burning house and confronting aggressive males much bigger than myself in order to protect a female.
            But as a (reasonably) intelligent individual I evaluated the risks before acting.
            Intelligent people tend to be more aware of the risks involved in a dangerous situation don’t they?
            Or are you placing obedience to authorities higher than individual conscience?
            (And I’m NOT talking about your beloved brother. I fully understand and respect your feelings in that regard))

          • carl jacobs

            My brother? Oh, you mean the stupid one who went to Vietnam and got shot for his trouble. No, you have already made known your thinking known on that subject. Probably all those guys at Passchendaele as well. Hell, I could make a damn fine argument about how one should have weighed the risks and opted out of World War I and its wasteful losses.

            The Gov’t has the rightful authority to send men to war. That’s not even a question. The US entered the war in Vietnam by exercise of the rightful authority of the US Gov’t. If you want to interpose your individual conscience over the authority of the Government, then you better have some superseding authority to stand upon. Is the Gov’t exceeding its divine mandate? Did it command something that God forbids? Did it forbid something that God commands? If not, then by what authority do you disobey?

          • dannybhoy

            “Did it command something that God forbids? Did it forbid something that God commands? ”
            Yes, it did. It ordered the invasion of a sovereign nation which wasn’t threatening the US, and guess who benefitted the most from that Carl?
            The guys who made armaments and dealt in drugs and other stuff…
            The same as the Bush family were cosied up to the Saudi royal family doing various deals whilst the big armaments manufacturers were able to increase their profits…

          • carl jacobs

            You are confusing your opinions about the Vietnam War with Holy Writ.

          • dannybhoy

            I don’t think I am. I think Holy Writ should be the bedrock of our thoughts on important issues. That means if I am convinced that a war is morally wrong (let’s say for example the UK’s involvement in Iraq and then Afghanistan, I don’t have to and didn’t support it.
            Which then according to HJ’s post brings me into conflict with St Paul’s admonition to obey the authorities.
            But I live in a democratic secular society, so if I believe the premise is wrong, why should I support it?
            Now if I was a member of Her Majesty’s (professional) armed services I would have to go along with it because I had pledged my allegiance to Her Majesty.
            If it was a conscripted war and I still didn’t accept the premise I would either have to serve in a non combatant role or take the consequences.
            To obey the Government simply because it is the Government might have led me to helping kill innocent Jews in WW2 because I was ordered to.

          • Anton

            It seems to me that you and Carl disagree on whether the following proposition is true or not: “that there exist causes A and B such that a man would fight bravely for cause A but seek to dodge the draft for cause B”.

          • dannybhoy

            Thanks Anton, you’ve stated that well.
            I think Carl quite understandably is thinking of his own dear brother’s sacrifice, and I with no emotional involvement, am thinking of why young Americans would have dodged the draft.
            I started by saying to Manfarang re the Vietnamese war..

            ‘That was a terrible and as far as I understand it, ‘political’ war. It is said that the Americans could have crushed North VietNam if they had really wanted to.
            I don’t think I could blame young Americans for avoiding the draft…’

            And then I/ he/Jack introduced the Christian aspect of obeying our leaders..
            And I cannot accept that in a free and democratic society I should have to obey, because that can lead to all sorts of moral corruption.
            There is no doubt that in today’s world we are far more informed about what is going on politically, what sort of deals are made under the table, and who actually profits from armed conflict. So we are right to weigh up the pros and cons and reject the notion of ‘My country right or wrong.’

          • All authority, all power, comes from God. Therefore obeying earthly, civil authority becomes part of our obedience to God. There is a proper role for civil disobedience, if circumstances warrant it. Running away to Canada and leaving others to fight and die, isn’t it.

          • dannybhoy

            I disagree
            Otherwise what’s the point of voting?
            Were Christian Germans right to take part in the Holocaust because ‘all power comes from God. Therefore obeying earthly, civil authority becomes part of our obedience to God’
            Rubbish. The early saints refused to obey civil authorities and accepted death instead.

          • Did you miss: “There is a proper role for civil disobedience, if circumstances warrant it”? The early Christians they stood their ground when God’s law was breached; they didn’t high-tail it off to Canada until the dust has settled. As for the Germans they should have opposed Nazism and not supported it. In a democracy all the scriptural responsibilities that God places on the the ruler are placed on us. We participate in the process. If you read the Bible from the beginning to the end you see a whole series of very serious responsibilities placed on the shoulders of the ruler of the people. The ruler of the people was to do justice, lead the people in the ways of the Lord, promote peace, defend life, and rescue the poor and the widowed. All of these responsibilities are now on us. We don’t just have the responsibility that belongs to the people; we have the responsibility that belongs to the sovereign because of our ability, our opportunity to take part in the political process.

          • dannybhoy

            Would they have known where Canada was?
            Actually there have been many many Christians down through the centuries who (understandably) fled from persecution.
            https://ucs.nd.edu/assets/233538/ucs_report_2017_web.pdf

          • Draftees were not being “persecuted” for their faith. If they were conscientious objectors then, according to American law, they could indicated this and served prison time. Isn’t this what Muhammed Ali did?

          • dannybhoy

            Yes, right on both counts Jack
            ( I hate losing a discussion, and anyways this one is going nowhere….)

          • dannybhoy

            “If you read the Bible from the beginning to the end you see a whole series of very serious responsibilities placed on the shoulders of the ruler of the people. The ruler of the people was to do justice, lead the people in the ways of the Lord, promote peace, defend life, and rescue the poor and the widowed.”

            You are actually talking about the nation of Israel, the Covenant people. God did not want them to have a king, but gave into their wishes
            ” All of these responsibilities are now on us. We don’t just have the responsibility that belongs to the people; we have the responsibility that belongs to the sovereign because of our ability, our opportunity to take part in the political process.”
            The Church has not replaced the Covenant people of Israel. They have been waiting for the times of the Gentiles to be fulfilled..

          • Sarky

            Hate to say it, but i agree with Carl. Personally I’d rather die on my feet, than live my life on my knees.
            Sometimes you just gotta put yourself in a shit position for the greater good.
            Had to do it myself a few times and i never backed down so that a colleague had to do it for me.

          • carl jacobs

            … Hate to say it? …

          • dannybhoy

            So you’re talking about a just war rather than a political (i.e. a war with hidden agendas or stoopid objectives).
            For example it was obvious that no amount of Western military dominance could change the mental and spiritual mindset of the people of Iraq, and we simply did not understand their worldview. So in the end a lot of people died, a lot of people had limbs blown off, and a lot of money was spent on military hardware.
            For what outcome?
            Greater hatred of the West and destabilisation of the Middle East, that’s what.

          • Sarky

            All this is very easy with hindsight isnt it??

          • dannybhoy
          • Sarky

            The problem is if soldiers can just refuse to fight for ideological reasons, then the whole thing falls apart doesnt it??

          • dannybhoy

            My earlier response to Carl, Sarky…
            “dannybhoy carl jacobs 2 hours ago
            I don’t think I am. I think Holy Writ should be the bedrock of our thoughts on important issues. That means if I am convinced that a war is morally wrong (let’s say for example the UK’s involvement in Iraq and then Afghanistan, I don’t have to and didn’t support it.
            Which then according to HJ’s post brings me into conflict with St Paul’s admonition to obey the authorities.
            But I live in a democratic secular society, so if I believe the premise is wrong, why should I support it?
            Now if I was a member of Her Majesty’s (professional) armed services I would have to go along with it because I had pledged my allegiance to Her Majesty.
            If it was a conscripted war and I still didn’t accept the premise I would either have to serve in a non combatant role or take the consequences.
            To obey the Government simply because it is the Government, might have led me to helping kill innocent Jews in WW2 because I was ordered to.”

          • Sarky

            Its difficult. How would you seperate the genuine from the cowards?

          • dannybhoy

            Well I hope that I would be strong enough in my own faith not to judge the guy who is cowardly or can’t cope, whilst trying to do my bit to fight the enemy..
            (In a just war -or what I considered a just war anyway.)
            Now for example I considered the Falklands War a just war because the people wanted to stay British and Argentina was clearly in the wrong. So it was about defending the will of the people against an oppressor.

          • dannybhoy

            Well I hope that I would be strong enough in my own faith not to judge the guy who is cowardly or can’t cope, whilst trying to do my bit to fight the enemy..
            (In a just war -or what I considered a just war anyway.)
            Now for example I considered the Falklands War a just war because the people wanted to stay British and Argentina was clearly in the wrong. So it was about defending the will of the people against an oppressor.

          • Sarky

            A just war is just a matter of perspective.

          • dannybhoy

            Kinda yes
            Kinda no.
            For example you as ‘a atheist’ would agree that to attack with the intention of subjugating a group of people who are living peacefully on a island, not threatening nor capable of threatening their nearer more powerful neighbour; would be morally wrong.
            Yes?
            Now is that simply a perspective, or is it wrong?
            Was the Allies united struggle against Hitler’s Germany simply ‘a matter of perspective’ or was it morally the right thing to do?
            Answers on a post card please.
            (You do have postcards in Suffolk ?)
            The danger in saying it’s a matter of perspective leads you inevitably to the conclusion that ‘might is right’.
            I’m going back to sleep now….

          • Anton

            How was the draft structured as you say, please? I hadn’t known that.

          • carl jacobs

            The college deferment. If you could get into college you were pretty safe from fighting in Vietnam because 1) you had a better chance of getting into the Air Force or the Navy where enlisted men were far more secure and 2) if you had a college degree you were too valuable to the military to be put into the infantry or another combat arms position. Who could get their kids into college? There were many upper class kids who rode that college deferment right though graduate school and into a PhD program. Who formed the backbone of the Middle Class in the 1960s? All those WWII vets who came back from the war and moved up via the GI Bill. They knew war and didn’t want their kids anywhere near it. And the gov’t obliged.

            That by the way was the irony of the college protesters. They weren’t really at risk. The war in Vietnam was fought by the kids of white blue-collar workers, blacks and Hispanics.

          • Anton

            Understood – thank you for this info.

          • Hi Danny ,

            The Chinese and Vietnamese (allied to the Soviets and not China as chairman Mao spilt with the Soviets ) , had a vicious border war in 1979.

          • dannybhoy

            Shalom Hannah,
            Not sure I understand your point.

  • dannybhoy

    As usual madam you seem to have your delicate digit on Mr. Slope’s er, pulse….

    • Lienus

      Up the Slope! Keep that finger in the Dyke, sir!
      It’s the theology of where I’m bumming from.

      • Allosexuel

        Weer ‘av yoo bean? Yoo can use ma baguette if yoo weash.

      • Anton

        Enjoy Les Rockies…

        • Lienus

          I am like Tony Blair: between Iraq and a hard place.

  • David

    Madam, your uncontested Friday masterpiece (or was it Saturday?) continues to excel.
    Indeed my name is already on the passenger manifest for the forthcoming voyage of “the Ark of Sanity to sail in the opposite direction”, to the prevailing cultural destruction. Both my trusty magnetic compass, now half a century old, plus my shiny new NIV Bible are already packed in my sea trunk in preparation for the journey. We sail on the evening, rising tide …..

    • Manfarang

      To Malacca? A nice place living in the past. It has a fine Church.
      I looked at NIV Bible at a midweek service last Thursday. I like the KJV better.

      • David

        Horses for courses ! The NRSV is my favourite translation for easy flow reading and capturing the general sense of the passages. For greater accuracy, when preparing for sermons or similar, I refer to my more accurate and weighty NIV study Bible which is packed with informative footnotes. When I feel down, I reach for the reassuring poetry of the King James. Ultimately, unless you’ve studied the ancient languages very well you rely on the skill and aims of the translators.
        But I haven’t been to Malacca.

        • Anton

          The NIV Study has excellent maps, charts and cross-references but I mistrust the footnotes.

          • David

            Agreed. And Paul’s letters are more than sufficiently twisty and windy without reading them with the clauses inverted from how we use them today. Expository preaching is my thing – I aim to present them with what is said, neither adding nor subtracting, but just making it clear what was meant in the original context.

          • Hi

            The evangelical people I’ve conversed with online say the bible they use is King James version only as all the others are corrupted by Satan.

          • Anton

            Satan seeks to corrupt all Bibles. If someone says that there is less corruption in King James then that can legitimately be debated, but it still doesn’t change the fact that language has changed meaning in the last 400 years, eg “suffer little children” (ie, let the little children) is a disastrous translation of the Greek of Matthew 19:14 for today. Then in Matthew 23:24 the KJV has “strain at a gnat and swallow a camel” where the Greek means “strain out a gnat and swallow a camel.” That’s a clear error. Acts 2:47 reads “the Lord added to the church daily such as should be saved” in King James, but the Greek means “the being-saved ones”. And the translators hadn’t a clue what Asherim meant in the Hebrew referring to a particular form of idolatrous worship, and wrote something meaningless in English.

          • Hi,

            Well studying Torah is done with the original Hebrew. I never get why you guys don’t do that and rely on other translations.

          • Anton

            Because Christianity is a proselytising religion unlike Judaism today, and we don’t wish to insist that someone must learn Hebrew and ancient Greek to become a Christian. It is enough that scholars exist who do and who can be referred to when exegetical details matter. Do keep in mind that Hebrew has always been a living language among Jews.

  • magnolia

    Yesterday’s ITV news was almost spitting. Any pretense at even-handed journalism has long disappeared and the whole thing is unguardedly partisan.

    John McCain, erstwhile pantomime villain, was now cast in the role of hero. One he favours, of course, though it has never wholly fitted the real details of his life, Presidential pardon included. (ITV conveniently forgets this). Still the man is ill, with a brain tumour so cannot be expected to think clearly, and perhaps least of all about healthcare. He killed the healthcare bill, but there are worse deaths on his record, besides which he is well known for hating Trump, and wanting wars.

    • Manfarang

      “Am I my brother’s keeper?”

  • Merchantman

    Day late with shocking News liberals are quitting the church due to slow pace of change, +Norwich warns.

    • Anton

      Great! What “church” are they quitting the CoE for?

      • David

        The Diocese of Diversity.
        It’s motto is, “We broaden as you watch us disappear”.
        It is so diverse they rewrite their beliefs every Sunday before standing to recite them. Then they make further ‘progress’ onto the next week.

      • Merchantman

        Quitting for the newly floated ‘Church of the Ten Apostates plc’, where anything goes. Bishopettes with batons a twirling, one hears.

  • Father David

    Merchantman – that’s news to me! Obviously they aren’t as well organised as Gavin Ashenden’s lot as I haven’t yet had wind of a liberal independence movement of dissenters.
    I wonder, “Do you know the Bishop of Norwich” then?

    • David

      His diocese has a reputation of being very liberal, more liberal than mine, just to the south.

      • Father David

        But it does contain the Shrine of Our Lady of Walsingham as its saving grace. Then again, that great man the Reverend Harold Davidson once ministered within its boundaries – so that’s at least two claims to fame.

        • David

          The existence of the shrine is an historical fact and accident and in no way reflects on the bishop who happens to have it locally. That strikes me as logically, an obvious category error.

          • Hardly an “accident”, David.

          • Father David

            Does God or His Mother do accidents? I rather thought that the existence of the Walsingham shrine (England’s Nazareth) was due more to an act of revelation.

          • dannybhoy

            Have you been to Nazareth?

    • Merchantman

      There was that fine Bishop Maurice Wood. But after that I lost touch with progress and turned to reality.

      • Father David

        1971 Maurice Wood
        1985 Peter Nott
        1999 Graham Jones
        It is good that every year the present Bishop of Norwich attends the National Walsingham pilgrimage in Our Lady’s month of May.
        Merchantman – I’m not quite sure that you quite understand the meaning of the phrase – “Do you know the Bishop of Norwich”?

        • Merchantman

          No I don’t, but I do remember something vaguely similar but simpler..

    • He led a crusade once upon a time

      https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Despenser%27s_Crusade
      And please note that there is a precedent for impeaching a Bishop.

    • dannybhoy

      I do
      I sorta shook/touched his hand once or twice at a meeting of the Synod..

  • Replace Catholic with Christian in the following:

    The anti-Gospel of the anti-Church is, in many cases, indistinguishable from secular ideology, which has overturned both the natural law and the Ten Commandments, the sources that, from time immemorial, have informed and protected man’s moral, spiritual and physical well-being. This anti-Gospel, which seeks to elevate the individual’s will to consume, to pleasure and to power over the will of God, was rejected by Christ when tempted in the wilderness. Disguised as “human rights”, it has reappeared, in all its luciferian hubris, to promulgate a narcissistic, hedonistic attitude that rejects any constraint except that imposed by man-made laws …

    Cardinal Carlo Caffarra, the founding president of the Pontifical John Paul II Institute for Studies on Marriage and the Family, wrote to Sister Lucia asking for prayers for this new undertaking. She declared in a signed response to him that “the final battle between the Lord and the kingdom of Satan will be about marriage and the family. Do not be afraid, because anyone who works for the sanctity of marriage and the family will always be fought and opposed in every way, because this is the decisive issue.”

    The Cardinal noted that for John Paul II this was the crux, as it touches the very pillar of creation, the truth of the relationship between man and woman, and among generations. It is well known that any tampering with a keystone risks the collapse of the entire building. The keystone, the basic cell of society is marriage and family. With the tacit acceptance of contraception and divorce, the recent ‘merciful’ embracing of remarried civil divorcees and the benign nod to same-sex ‘marriage’, the keystone has been tampered with and the omega point has been reached …

    It is self-evident that the Catholic Church and the anti-Church currently co-exist in the same sacramental, liturgical and juridical space. The latter, having grown stronger, is now attempting to pass itself off as the true Church, all the better to induct, or coerce, the faithful into becoming adherents, promoters and defenders of a secular ideology. Should the anti-Church succeed in commandeering all the space of the true Church, the rights of man will supplant the rights of God through the desecration of the sacraments, the sacrilege of the sanctuary, and the abuse of apostolic power. Thus, politicians who vote for abortion and same-sex “marriage” will be welcome at the Communion rails; husbands and wives who have abandoned their spouses and children and entered into adulterous relationships will be admitted to the sacraments; priests and theologians who publicly reject Catholic doctrines and morals will be at liberty to exercise ministry and to spread dissent, while faithful Catholics will be marginalised, maligned and discredited at every turn. Thus, the anti-Church would succeed in achieving its goal of dethroning God as Creator, Saviour and Sanctifier and replacing Him with man the self-creator, the self-saviour and the self-sanctifier …

    To achieve its objectives, the anti-Church, in collaboration with the secular powers, uses the law and media to browbeat the true Church into submission. By adroit use of the media, the activists of the anti-Church have managed to intimidate bishops, clergy and most of the Catholic press into silence. Equally, the lay faithful are terrorised by fear of the hostility, ridicule and hate that would be visited upon them should they object to the imposition of LGBT ideology. For example, in 2015, the congregation of St Nicholas of Myra in the Archdiocese of Dublin gave a standing ovation to their parish priest when he declared from the pulpit that he was gay and urged them to support same-sex “marriage” in the Irish referendum. It is not difficult to imagine the kind of treatment that an objector would have received. Thus, the oppressive influence of the anti-Church is most clearly seen at work when a person is fearful to openly uphold God’s revelation about homosexuality, abortion or contraception in their parish community.

    Indeed, faithful Catholics, both lay and clerical, are increasingly subjected to a legitimate fear that their livelihood and careers would be in jeopardy should they stand up against the anti-Church. Employers are particularly fearful when activists of secular groups level charges of ‘homophobia’ or ‘transphobia’ against their faithful Catholic employees. Dreading the potential loss of business, employers, in these situations, often feel constrained into silencing or even dismissing accused Catholics. Whilst bad publicity from the LGBT lobby can damage business, most employers have an even greater fear of the adverse legal judgments that conflicts with such groups can bring them. Even so, one should not ignore the reality that there are still other employers who would readily acquiesce to complaints against a faithful Catholic because consciously, or unconsciously, they are in sympathy with the anti-Church. As is well known from numerous test cases, when employers are faced with pressure from LGBT activists, freedom of speech and freedom of conscience of their employees are disregarded, if not suppressed. Most faithful Catholics, especially those working in the public sector, know this, feel intimidated and so keep quiet about their opposition to secular ideology.

    https://www.lifesitenews.com/opinion/the-anti-church-has-arrived-and-it

    Read the full talk. It’s worth the effort.

    • Anton

      Some of the things in it are too specifically Catholic for me, but I greatly appreciate the ecumenism in your introductory comment, and we have the Nicene creed in common and secular humanism as a common enemy, and that’s a lot.

      • If one removes the Catholic elements and references the general thrust of the talk is appropriate for all Christians.

    • “The final battle between the Lord and the kingdom of Satan will be about marriage and the family.”

      It won’t. To inveigh over marriage and the family is certainly not wrong, but it is to attempt to treat the symptoms. Unbelief, and the pride of life are the disease. The great battle is over the Gospel. It is because Britain has largely lost the Gospel that the various abominations that have dominated this blog recently have come about. Christians need to preach salvation by faith alone and the New Birth. If more people become Christians, these symptoms will start to diminish as they did in the 18th Century under the influence of the Great Awakening.

      • Read it again – the whole article – and concentrate.

        • I agree with the bit about replacing Catholic with Christian.

          • “There are not one hundred people … who hate the Catholic Church, but there are millions who hate what they wrongly perceive the Catholic Church to be.”
            (Fulton J. Sheen)

    • Royinsouthwest

      It is an interesting talk. There is no doubt where Fr. Linus Clovis stands. I wonder what this blog’s very own “Linus” would make of it? He would probably reject it in its entirety but perhaps there might be something in it that would sow a seed that would eventually germinate.

  • IanCad

    Don’t know of any traditionalists who would want to put their finger in a dyke. Nor, for that matter, any dykes who would want to receive such from a traditionalist.

    • Allosexuel

      Mon anglais is pour but a dyke es a waul billt to stoop ze see. Wot is zee raison foor pouting a doigt in et?

    • David

      You’re becoming quite risqué of late my friend.

      • IanCad

        Your point is well taken David and I was aware that such a charge could be leveled.
        The monstrous march of forces determined to corrupt our children, to change the natural order and to pervert our culture needs to be blunted; and if occasional unseemliness bubbles up, so be it.
        Mrs. P’s post referenced our Minister of Education who is at the forefront of persuading our children that same-sex relationships are perfectly hunky-dory. This AM the BBC is celebrating fifty years of “Gay Britannia,” the general tenor of which is – or so it seems to me – the smartest, most influential and interesting people are not to be found in the straight sector of society.
        There is no need for me in this response to repeat my commitment to civil liberties, nor to condemn past persecutions of the “Different.”
        What I will repeat are my concerns that, unless fought against, our society will go the way of past great cultures; unless it’s already too late.

        • Inspector General

          Ian – a crisp twenty pound note that gay disease is not dwelt on to any any extent in Gay Britannia. Nor mental illness including depression or the madness which sends an individual to so despise their body that they ‘change sex’ as simple things like fish do. Nor the paedophilia and the outrageous child abuse involved or the pornography produced which scourge the internet. Nor the drug abuse. Nor the cost to the NHS in resources…

          One could go on…

          • bluedog

            Inspector, the sex-change wheeze is intriguing and open to prodigious abuse. Now that the whole order of society has become feminised, one can see the merit in becoming a woman. Get with the strength, we’ve always been outnumbered after all. Painful surgery is no longer required to qualify, and the costs are no longer higher than the benefits. Indeed, one can make the case that every chap in the land should make the switch and take maternity leave.

          • Hi

            Yes , yet none of these people will be able to experience joys like “the time of the month ” or getting preggers ….

          • bluedog

            Those aspects of femininity are neither here nor there, Hannah. It’s how one feels and identifies that matters.

          • Hi bluedog,

            Woman = adult female human being (XX)

            Man = adult male human being (XY)

          • bluedog

            O Hannah, your innocence is one of your most attractive characteristics.

          • Linus

            So what about the adult human being who looks like a woman, has female morphology right down to fully formed female genitals, but who has no uterus, but instead has undescended testes and XY chromosomes?

            Androgen Insensitivity Syndrome is a real condition experienced by thousands of people. According to your classification whereby chromosomes are the only determiner of gender, these people are male even though everyone (including themselves in the majority of cases) regards them as female.

            So what should they do? Hack off their breasts, sew up their nether regions and hang a sausage there in order to comply as best they can with your diktat that they are and can only ever be men? Or would you tell them to dress as men, put on a deep voice and stick on a fake mustache? Perhaps you think they’re neither men nor women. Perhaps not even human. What then would you call them? And how would you treat them?

            Gender is a complex business for some people. Sometimes chromosomes don’t match expressed gender. Some individuals even have mosaic chromosomes, ie. their cells are a mixture of XY and XX. If they don’t fit into your neat little boxes, what should they do? Hide themselves away so you don’t have to deal with them?

            Thankfully those days are over. They’re here. They’re real. They have to be taken account of. It’s not up to you or anyone else to tell them what they are and how they must define themselves. They’ll do that for themselves and if you don’t like it, tough luck.

          • Do you know how rare this genetic condition is? Complete AIS affects 2 to 5 per 100,000 people. Partial AIS is thought to be at least as common as complete androgen insensitivity. Being a medical condition, detectable by tests, this is not the same as gender dysphoria, a mood disorder where one feels identification with the opposite gender and discomfort with one’s biological sex.

          • Linus

            Rare or not, AIS and other intersex conditions exist and must therefore be explained by your theology if you want that theology to be taken seriously.

            So what does your church say to a married couple that has just discovered the reason for their childlessness is AIS? If someone who thought she was a woman, but is actually a man, has married another man, does your church annul their marriage and declare them homosexual sinners who must part or be guilty of abomination? Even if they decide that an AIS individual is not really a man, according to Christian standards she can’t properly be called a woman either if her genome is male and she has undescended testes. If marriage can only take place between a man and a woman, any marriage she enters into must therefore be invalid. So whatever happens, she can never marry. But as there aren’t very many others like her, who cares, right? Tell her to stop whining and get herself to a nunnery, eh? Or a monastery perhaps?

            Where exactly should she hide herself away so that she doesn’t present a living contradiction to your claim that we’re all either male or female and your sky pixie never makes mistakes?

          • Inspector General

            Dear Hannah. Your cis agenda pushing the ‘purity’ of womanhood would be deeply hurtful to T women if they became aware of it. It’s a form of hate, you know. Being a lesbian won’t save you. Far from it. You would be expected to hold the LGBT line at all times.

          • Hi Inspector

            Yes I’ve been called all that and worse . This is why I object to the umbrella “LGBTQ” that was a creation of the self-appointed “Gay leadership” , nothing to do with me or other gays and lesbians.

          • Inspector General

            And so we find a civil war in progress (over on PN at least). LGBT versus LGB. Quite vicious, with all kinds of accusations flying around, including tranny-insanity and tranny-phobia….

          • Hi Inspector,

            I’m always amazed at the depth and breadth of your knowledge of LGBT affairs. I think you should have your own pink news column.

            I was called a” cis lesbian TERF ” the other day for saying I objected to transgender self identification because of men being able to use women’s toilets , changing rooms and sports teams. The thing I’d I don’t know what TERF stands for!

          • Inspector General

            TERF stands for Trans Exclusive Radical Feminist. In other words, men, don’t even THINK about dreaming of dressing as a woman. Queen TERF is probably devil-will-take Germaine Greer.

            Hannah, you really ought to abandon living with your lesbian credentials on your sleeve. In the same way the left handed Inspector does not take issue with the right handed world he lives in. What’s the point. Anyway, the Inspector is deliriously happy with his lot, even if he is left handed and considered sinister by many…

          • Hi

            Well you learn something every day!

            Turning to the rest , I don’t live with my “lesbian credentials on my sleeve”. Even when blogging on our joint blog, I rarely discuss gay stuff and keep my private life just that : private . In actual fact it tends to be one or two others who seem to have the one-stop obsession about my sex life (if that’s what you refer to).

            I would also say that to draw you analogy left and right handed people, I don’t think I’ve ever criticised heterosexual people. I’m not bothered about transgender people either. I am bothered about the current proposals to in effect legally allow anyone to identify as anything which creates all sorts of issues as I’ve mentioned above.

            It’s the nine days at the moment , so no music, wine or meat. There’s a fast on Monday night to Tuesday night. After that I shall be even happier!

            Oh and I am also left handed and in short deliriously happy with my lot too!

          • Inspector General

            Ah! A member of the much put upon left handed club. Topper news, Hannah!

            I say, anymore of us out there. Left handed types, at the mercy of right handed bigots. Upticks if you would. That way you will remain anonymous…

            Almost forgot. The deliriously happy only please…

          • Inspector General

            Ah, one hadn’t considered that, Bluedog. That is, it’s all a result of gradual feminisation of us all. But of course, how can it be other…

            An Inspector recalls a somewhat madcap report on BBC on-line news, which made capital about the Y chromosome being tiny in comparison to the X. This inane observation was followed by the suggestion that one day, the Y could be done away with completely. Its continued existence mattering not.

            For those who are not aware, the BBC now crows that 10% of its staff identify as LGBT. Presumably, this is not enough, and that the ideal would be 50%.

          • bluedog

            Does the Beeb ever crow about the numbers of its staff that vote Labour, Lib-Dim or Green? One can confidently predict that the aggregate would well in excess of 50%, probably more like 75%. The point here is that if the BBC claims to be broadly representative of the community it serves, in political affiliation it is more than a little deviant.

          • Inspector General

            It’s without doubt that LGBT and more importantly, their allies, taken the percentage over 50 at the BBC.

            One imagines the institution to resemble Stalin’s Russia in microcosm. That is, everyone is leaning to the left anyway. There just aren’t any worthwhile numbers of those who don’t. The question is, as Joe himself was most concerned in his empire, was whether you were sufficiently zealous thereof.

          • Manfarang

            Actually the Russians are a rather conservative lot, many held on the their religious beliefs despite Stalin.

          • Inspector General

            And the conservative nature of the people was not lost on Stalin. So he came up with a fearsome organisation to ‘keep an eye on them’. Can you guess what that was…

          • Manfarang

            Keep an eye on his rivals. The show trial defendants were Communist party members and Trotskyists.

          • Inspector General

            Forget Machiavelli. Joseph Stalin is ‘The Prince’

            For those not in the know, Stalin had to pay liars to testify against some of those fellows executed for treason. Many were saintly Corbyn types.

            Now, here’s the REALLY clever bit. After those liars successfully had their assigned victim done away with by due process of Soviet law, they themselves were arrested! Well, they’d incriminated themselves with their own lies you see. They were hurriedly put on trial, privately away from the public interest, you understand, and…………….
            shot! (What did you expect they’d get. A dacha by the Black Sea and a pension for life?)

          • Manfarang

            It is now known that the confessions were given only after great psychological pressure and torture had been applied to the defendants. From the accounts of former GPU officer Alexander Orlov and others the methods used to extract the confessions are known: repeated beatings, torture, making prisoners stand or go without sleep for days on end, and threats to arrest and execute the prisoners’ families. For example, Kamenev’s teenage son was arrested and charged with terrorism. After months of such interrogation, the defendants were driven to despair and exhaustion.

          • Inspector General

            It was Stalin who re-criminalised homosexuality after Lenin’s death, and considering the insidious undermining of society by militant LGBT today, an Inspector can only conclude that this is to Stalin’s credit.

            “Not all bad” then…

          • Manfarang

            Your visa is in the mail.

          • Inspector General
          • Manfarang

            There’s nowt so queer as folk

          • Inspector General

            He’s only 5 yet he’s had more grooming than a champion thoroughbred…

          • Poor little boy, burdening him at that age is criminal. I can see he doesn’t really understand at all. They justify everything under the banner of love.

          • Inspector General

            At 5, one remembers being told of the passing of Churchill, Marie. Although one realised he was a man of importance, that was about it. Well, a young fellow had only been around for 60 or so months, so hardly surprising…

          • Anton

            His funeral was the first national event whose import I understood, thanks to my parents. I watched it intently on TV and was glad to have bagged it when it was rebroadcast on its 50th anniversary.

          • Anton

            The Russian Orthodox church hierarchy?

            Russian Orthodox priests were pressed to pass on information about Christians to the KGB. A few refused, but 80-85% of priests collaborated including the entire hierarchy, for advancement depended on cooperation (see The Mitrokhin Archive, chapter 28, The penetration and persecution of the Soviet churches; Mitrokhin was a disillusioned KGB archivist who noted down thousands of pages of files).

          • IanCad

            You’re too kind Inspector – not until the entire world is corrupted will they be content.

          • Inspector General

            What continues to impress time and time again is that for the fervent homosexual society changer, there is from them a singular lack of concern from where the next generation of humanity (and homosexuals) is coming from. Their overwhelming atheist stance contributes. For these people this is it. They are it, and life is for them and their personal contentment. No one else matters. All very gay, then…

          • IanCad

            If it (Homo Disease) is dwelt upon at all, my money would be on the “ignorant and unenlightened” members of society being assigned the blame.

          • Inspector General

            Don’t worry about ignorance and un-enlightenment, Ian. Big Gay perennially mount assaults on our education system to put an end to that. You see, the reason we are so positioned on the subject is that we are ignorant. That can be prevented by introducing LGBT studies to children from around the age of 5. Which also seems to be the time when a child can say they’d rather be a member of the opposite sex and have their wish come true at a future date.

          • Inspector General

            Ah, manna from heaven! It just materialised in front of the Inspector, and shows the importance of LGBT infiltration in the education system. One would hope that our Minister of Education is wise to this creepy gay agenda…
            ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
            Equality Network Lilian Halcombe • 18 minutes ago
            Of those 1075 sexual orientation hate crimes, 21 (2%) were diverted to the Children’s Reporter – which means that the accused person was under 16 and instead of being prosecuted, there is in effect a social work intervention. That 2% is typical for hate crime in Scotland.

            However, for transphobic hate crimes in Scotland in 2016-17, 6 out of 40 (15%) were diverted to the Children’s Reporter, compared to 0, 1 or 2 in each of the previous five years, and that’s the (sole) fact behind this story. What’s the significance? Well it could be a statistical blip, but it’s quite a big one. In any case it’s clear that much more needs to be done across Scotland’s school system to address homophobia, biphobia and transphobia.

            •Reply•Share ›

          • Anton

            Please refer to so-called hate crime as free speech crime henceforth.

        • bluedog

          ‘Minister of Education who is at the forefront of persuading our children that same-sex relationships are perfectly hunky-dory.’ Doesn’t the sexual grooming of white minors have implications reminiscent of Rotherham? Or is it only middle-aged brown men who are inherently guilty in this regard?

          • IanCad

            Too true bd!!! What she is doing deserves the same disgust as that visited upon paedophiles, child porn merchants, charity fiddlers, abortionists and the like.

          • Merchantman

            Unfortunate but as I’ve said she was born, educated and raised in Rotherham. Worth looking into her comments intervention or not, of that business or did she just lie low.

        • David

          It was not a “charge”, Ian, more of a teasing observation. My opinions are entirely congruent with yours.

        • Dominic Stockford

          Radio 3 has even begun to ‘celebrate’ “Gay Britannia”, and worse, they had it scrolling across the digital radio read-out that they were doing so. Aieeeee!!!!

          • IanCad

            Dominic,
            Were it not theologically incompatible, I would say that Lord Reith would be rolling in his grave.
            I really do believe that the cup is just about to overflow.

    • SIZE 15CARBON FOOTPRINT

      Not even out of idle curiosity

      • Anton

        Great handle!

  • Inspector General

    Mrs Proudie, the Inspector was taking his constitutional along a somewhat unfamiliar part of town. He spied a bakery shop…

    “Good day to you madam. I wish to take tea in your establishment”

    “And a good day to you, sir. Would you like a slice of delicious cake”

    “I most certainly would, my good woman. I am left handed, you should know”

    “Are you really, sir. I cannot see the significance…”

    “With your left hand, madam. You must cut the cake with your left hand”

    “Oh really! Anything else you would like, special one”

    “Yes. I require you to stand on your head at the same time, and to whistle ‘Dixie’.

    “Would you mind leaving this shop forthwith sir. I refuse to serve you”

    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

    The Outcome. The case was heard and the Equality Rights Nonsense act was found to be severely punctured. The proprietoress is now doing penal servitude in Australia. Let this be a lesson to all who hate the left handed…

    • Sarky

      Always had an inkling you were a proponent of the left hand path.

    • Manfarang

      Clearly a case involving fruitcake.
      ( I still have some fruitcake in the fridge at the office. The others just don’t seem interested, they didn’t like crumpet either)

    • Father David

      Here’s me thinking you were ambidextrous.

      • Dominic Stockford

        He claims to be left-footed, but the other left-footers on here deny anything to do with him….

  • Sarky

    Like peeling off your skin and rolling in salt.

  • Royinsouthwest

    The Barnabas Fund has an article on their website showing how the British government is threatening freedom of religion both at home and abroad.

    UK Foreign Office agency says Evangelical Christians in the Global South should “reinterpret” the Bible
    https://barnabasfund.org/news/UK-Foreign-Office-agency-says-Evangelical-Christians-in-the-Global-South-should-reinterpret-the-Bible

    A report produced by an executive agency of the UK Foreign and Commonwealth Office has argued that Evangelical Christians in the Global South should be expected to “reinterpret” the Bible to make it compatible with LGBT ideology. The recommendations, if implemented, would massively reverse freedom of religion across the globe.

    The report, and other damaging activities by the British government, are mentioned by the Rev Jules Gomes in an article at the Conservative Women website.

    ‘Rebel Priest’ Rev Jules Gomes: Cameron and May carpet-bomb the family with their crazy ideas
    http://www.conservativewoman.co.uk/rebel-priest-rev-jules-gomes-cameron-may-carpet-bomb-family-crazy-ideas/

  • Dominic Stockford

    I misread your conclusion as ‘Until next time, dear hurts’. I do, hurt that is, looking at what is happening around us.