Conservative Party

Tories lose majority – what an unmitigated, self-inflicted disaster

Pride goes before a fall, and crap manifestos go before a democratic drubbing. Honestly, how did the Brexit election get hijacked by a dementia tax? Why mention the restoration of fox hunting? What was all that ‘Team May’ and ‘Theresa’s local candidates’ about? How could the most important issue facing the United Kingdom in a generation become such a peripheral issue during the campaign? Why churn out anodyne slogans when the people wanted an injection of hope and an infusion of understanding? What is stable about a manifesto policy U-turn during a campaign? What is strong about the constant denials that anything had changed at all? How can the Conservative Party expect the whole country to move forward together when millions of people still smell a whiff of nastiness?

Even if the manifesto wasn’t nasty, people still thought it was, or felt it was, or somehow sensed it was. And Theresa May never seemed to possess the natural warmth and emotional intelligence to charm the crowds and change minds. She might exude a homely dependability on ‘The One Show’, but there was a feeling she lacked authenticity, and it isn’t so easy to fool many of the people anymore, and certainly not all the time. They now seem to prefer politicians who can’t add up, befriend terrorists, advocate the defeat of the state and worship Karl Marx.

Why was this manifesto written by a clique? How come senior ministers weren’t aware of its contents? Where was the compassion? Where was any support for the family? What about the ‘Just About Managing’ who were promised half a teaspoon of jam deferred until a tomorrow that never seems to come? What about society, charity, humanity and generosity? Where was the optimism, expectation and encouragement? A dose of kindness? A bit of cheer? A glimpse of the promised land?

When an election campaign is invaded by terrorist bombs and machetes, you don’t harp on about the imperative to cut police numbers because of austerity. When you’re asked about cuts to the number of armed officers, you don’t duck and dive and leave all the plain-speaking to your political opponents, however disingenuous they might be. How… How have erstwhile supporters of the IRA triumphed over the party of law and order, national security and the armed services? Is our collective national memory really so short that the man who stood shoulder-to-shoulder with those who murdered Lord Mountbatten and tried to wipe out Margaret Thatcher’s Cabinet came within a whisker of the keys to No.10?

With no majority in the House of Commons, the ‘Great Repeal Bill’ fades away and grammar schools whither. With no majority, it’s hard to see how Brexit will now mean Brexit (that is, out of the single market and customs union; free of the European Court of Justice; the end of free movement; out of the CAP and the CFP; and the restoration of parliamentary supremacy). You don’t boast about being a ‘bloody difficult woman’ if those bloody difficulties lead to greater division and more instability. With Brexit in jeopardy and the clamour for ‘soft Brexit’ growing, it is difficult at this stage to see where the necessary leadership will come from.

Theresa May’s gamble has backfired; she has failed. If she manages to survive without an internal leadership challenge, she may face a vote of no confidence in Parliament, which would precipitate another general election. That might just put Jeremy Corbyn into No.10.

Would someone please call the nation to prayer?

  • CliveM

    She took her core vote for granted, alienated it and went for fools gold instead. Not only was she a poor campaign performer, but the strategy was wrong. Hunting for seats in Labour strongholds and ignoring your own marginals is simply stupid.

    And we are all going to pay the price.

    She needs to stand down, but when?

    • XH558

      Ages since I posted in a comment thread, but on this bleak morning feel compelled simply to agree with every word of the original post, and this comment on it.

      • bluedog

        What type was XH558?

        • XH558

          “Avro Vulcan XH558 The Spirit Of Great Britain was the last remaining airworthy example of the 134 Avro Vulcan jet powered delta winged strategic nuclear bomber aircraft operated by the Royal Air Force during the Cold War.”
          I retired the nick a year ago, a few months after she last flew.

          • Anton

            I saw her on her final tour of the country’s airshows. Concorde was plagiarised from the Vulcan, just lengthen the bomb bay, strengthen the airframe to supersonic spec, and redesign the engine air intakes to handle incoming supersonic flow. Magnificent planes. I’ve been to a talk by Withers who piloted the only Vulcan ever to fly a bombing mission, to the Falklands. What a story!

          • XH558

            I wish I had been at Withers’ talk.
            As a small boy my father took me to a Battle of Britain day at RAF Finningley. They did a Vulcan Squadron scramble – still one of the most awe-inspiring sights and sounds of my life.

          • Anton

            You may know this, but the prototype Vulcan had a straight leading edge on its delta wing, not an ogive. See exactly one minute in at

          • XH558

            No I didn’t know that. We had some fabulous aircraft at the time. Love that Vixen too, but the Vulcan just looks and sounds like the very embodiment of doom.

          • Anton

            Exactly. It brought the phrase “the wings of the angel of death” to my mind and thankfully it was on our side.

            Of our various air museums, RAF Cosford has a unique number of our innovative early 1950s jet designs that never got beyond a prototype for want of money. Amazing hangar display.

          • XH558

            Thanks. I have not been to Cosford. Would make an interesting day.

    • Who could replace her though?

      • Mike Stallard

        Nigel Farage.

        • I agree. He’s got the ability, a good knowledge, experience, confidence and oratory skills required as well as charisma, vision and assertiveness to deal with the EU commissioners whom he knows fairly well. He loves the UK, and has built up experience of dealing with awkward questions posed by Jo and Joanne public and the press, and most importantly he’s got a thick skin.

        • bluedog

          Joke.

      • CliveM

        Now there’s the rub. Who has the necessary combination of hard work, charisma and judgement?

        No one I can see.

        • jaundicedi

          David Davis.

      • Anton

        Francis Urquhart.

        • Possibly.

          • Anton

            Those were his first words after the credits:

      • Captain Cutlass

        Boris

    • bluedog

      ‘She needs to stand down, but when?’

      Wrong. May now needs to self-assess and fight. There are multiple dangers, not least of which lie within, such as the return of Cameron and Osborne. Give Soames a peerage and he would probably stand aside.

      • CliveM

        Osborne’s antics at the Standard means he will never be leader. He didn’t have a lot of friends before the election, he has less now.

        I agree (see my other comment) that now is not the time for her to stand down. Not least due to the lack of a credible replacement. But barring a miracle, she is a dead man walking and has lost any authority.

    • Royinsouthwest

      She thought that with a massive lead in the polls when she called the election and with Corbyn being regarded as unelectable even by many, perhaps most, of his MPs, she had a chance to consign the Labour Party to the same fate that overtook the Liberals in the 1920s when they ceased to be a credible party of government. What a classic tale of hubris.

      I was not at all surprised by the Brexit vote, nor by Trump’s victory in the US, but I must admit I did not see this coming. Theresa May has made Marxism respectable again and strengthened the political parties that are, to paraphrase Tony Blair, soft on terrorism and soft on the causes of terrorism.

      • CliveM

        It is a source of dismay to me, that a man who loves the enemies of this country, more than he loves his country, should have done so well.

  • Dolphinfish

    But the Tories are NOT the party of law and order, except where it suits them, like during the miners strike. They thought they could do without police officers in recent years, so they cut them. Bad move. They were always a self-serving Masonic lodge, not loyal to the UK, not even loyal to England (which, of course, IS the UK). They got what they deserve.

  • Sarky

    Now we know why she hid during the referendum.

    • CliveM

      Yep.

    • Royinsouthwest

      She also kept a low profile during the leadership contest after Cameron resigned and waited for her rivals to wreck each others chances.

  • Linus

    Oh this is soooo funny! :-))))

    May is toast. Brexit hangs in the balance.

    Europe laughs!

    • Mike Stallard

      Wrong. Europe does not care: it has other problems to face up to. We are not the centre of attention out there: we are a tiny half forgotten footnote.

      • Linus

        Yes, it’s true that we don’t care what happens to Britain. Once you voted to quit the EU, you forfeited your right to our support and concern. When your partner walks out on you, you’re no longer responsible for his/her well-being.

        There is such a thing as Schadenfreude though. You dumped us thinking things would be so rosy. Now reality is hitting home. Serves you right.

        • Anton

          Hard Brexit ahoy, all is well internationally if not domestically.

          • Linus

            All is well?

            You don’t have a single trade agreement in place and no reasonable prospect of negotiating any before you leave the EU.

            Trump may support you, but he’s a weak president who can’t get anything done and who may not be there much longer if further revelations about his dealings with Russia lead to him being impeached.

            You’re up Brexit creek without a paddle or a canoe and the water is rising. I’d wish you luck if I thought it would do any good. But let’s face it, now you don’t even have a government, you’re completely buggered.

          • Anton

            Your record is stuck. I suggest you read my longer post above, beginning “This happened because…”

        • Royinsouthwest

          How long do you give the Euro zone?

          • bluedog

            The Eurozone is likely to be the trigger of the next great financial panic that so many of the better informed now await. That and the possibility of a simultaneous collapse in the Chinese economy.

    • Anton

      This is a problem for Britain, to be sure, but it is a bigger problem for the EU if nobody is at home to negotiate with in Westminster because the default is a hard Brexit. That suits me fine; how about EU?

      • Linus

        A hard Brexit was always going to happen no matter who won this election, so the result changes nothing on that score.

        Only the British thought they could have their cake and eat it too – some kind of association that would give you access to the single market with none of the obligations that go with it. But that was never going to happen. It’s all or nothing, in or out. And now you’re out.

        HMS Britain is adrift at sea with no hand on the tiller. It’s almost as though you want to run aground…

        • Anton

          I think you don’t actually believe many of the things you write; your aim is to wind up regardless. I don’t think you believe what you’ve just written, for instance.

        • Royinsouthwest

          Isn’t the EU attitude to the Greeks “let them eat cake?”

    • Royinsouthwest

      L’Europe est moi!

  • Mike Stallard

    Here is what her Brexit Ministers should have said:

    Please would you get us out of the EU as it congeals into the EUSSR. We do not need the Euro. We do not need to be governed by a small Commission of unelected secret and probably corrupt Europeans. We do not need to have our laws enforced by a court – or courts – without a jury. We need habeas corpus and an end to extradition. We have to leave.

    BUT

    We also have to keep trading and by far the easiest way to do this, in the year or so we have left, is to leave the Single Market – the EU/EEA and to join EFTA/EEA. I know it is nowhere near perfect. That is for sure! I also know that a lot of Norwegian politicians would love to join the EU.

    But it is better than nothing. Better than becoming a “third country” which, as you know will wreck our economy permanently.

    Please will you at least think about this solution – temporary as it is. It does not stop us negotiating, indeed it actually provides a forum for us to argue our case.

    See? Positive. A way forward that will unite the country.

    • Manfarang

      Joining EFTA requires the consent of its members. Norway objects because it would require the renegotiation of trade deals.

      • Mike Stallard

        I presume you are in personal touch with statsminister Erna Solberg?

  • Politically__Incorrect

    Yes it is one hell of a bloody mess. A time for prayer that some real leadership will emerge from the ashes of this election.

  • len

    If May had set out to deliberately lose the election she couldn’t have done a better job.
    With a initial lead in the polls May presented some hugely divisive policies and the people drew back in trepidation.
    A huge Tory victory would have punished those on the bottom end of the scale.
    The people rejected the uncaring face of the Tories.
    In case anyone wonders I voted Tory.

    • dannybhoy

      Me/we too. We even rearranged our postal vote as we are on holiday…
      The doubts set in when a free vote on fox hunting was announced; then the u-turn on the so called ‘dementia tax.’
      There was however no other party worth voting for, so we shall have to batten down the hatches and take the consequences…..

  • I can’t help thinking about Cranmer’s last post about choosing the lesser of two evils; perhaps this is what happens when there’s no genuinely ‘good’ choice; evil is chaotic by its nature. When you turn out all the lights, everyone’s left fumbling around in the dark. What a mess.

  • David

    The Conservative Party is very skilled at picking the wrong leaders. Class, style and appearance count with them for more than possessing ability and integrity, and indeed for far more than being a true conservative thinker. The best potential leaders are always denied the top job. The result is that despite the UK being predominately a conservative nation, the so called Conservative Party often gets it seriously wrong. What a bloody mess !
    The only consolation is that Comrade Corbyn has not been given the opportunity to wreck the economy, not yet anyway !
    This is a time for prayer for our nation. Pray God that we break free, decisively free, of the wretched EU, otherwise the struggle will have to be restarted, all over again.

    • bluedog

      Absent Farage, and with Arron Banks nowhere to be seen, the Ukip vote is further reduced, almost to a state of irrelevance. Only the other day you were announcing your intention to vote Ukip. So much for your political judgement. We can therefore take heart from your criticism of the Conservatives, it is likely to be as irrelevant as a vote for Ukip.

      • David

        Got out of bed the wrong side did we, and woke up with a nasty, little bark !
        There, there calm down now, because your little barky rant makes no sense whatsoever.
        Some of us prefer to support well reasoned principles and ideals, at least when by doing so, we don’t shoot ourselves in the foot. So living in a very safe Conservative seat I was able to vote for Ukip. But being a political pragmatist, when necessary for the good of the nation, the common good, I also said that if I lived in a marginal Conservative constituency I’d vote Conservative. But perhaps that line of reasoning is a strain too far for you ?

        • bluedog

          No amount of bluster can alter the fact that Ukip is a rank outsider in what is essentially a two horse race.

      • Little Black Censored

        “Absent Farage”??? Is that his Christian name?

        • bluedog

          No.

  • Ivan M

    It’s a fair reflection of the actual support for Brexit. The Brexiteers went overboard with their so called mandate to leave Europe. It was no such thing as most people were protesting the anti-pee orientation of some of the European policies. One can’t blame the politicians. For in truth there was nowhere else to go. The young people who need jobs understand that it is better to be part of a large trading bloc than to be out in the cold.

    • morbidfascination

      Former members of the USSR would not agree, looking back.

  • William Lewis

    Democracy eh? Can’t live with it. Can’t live without it. And yet He who sees further and knows more than any here will bring all to a just conclusion, thank God! Let us pray.

    • dannybhoy

      Man proposes, God disposes eh?

      • William Lewis

        Prayers for mercy and revival are the top of my list. Our needs are greater than strong leadership, important though that is.

  • CliveM

    Here’s the thing. Brexit negotiations start in 11days. By the we need a functioning Government. There is no time for a Tory leadership election. She will go, just not immediately.

    • David

      Totally agree. The “men in grey suits” will, being pragmatists, give her a chance to save a sliver of her legacy by cobbling together a coalition, probably with the DUP; then the EU negotiations will start, as there’s no other choice, I’d say. But within, say a year at the most, she’ll be replaced. Let’s hope that they realise that her waltz leftwards was a disaster, and return, sharp rightwards to something recognisably conservative. At least this means than David Davies remains as Brexit secretary – hopefully !

      • bluedog

        ‘Let’s hope that they realise that her waltz leftwards was a disaster,’ Really? I see, so that explains the rejection of Corbyn’s extreme left positions, does it?

        • CliveM

          I feel there is a weariness with the electorate with austerity. They are also reading stories of nurses at food banks and seeing their real income decline year after year. People are sick of it and tbh personally I’m feeling uncomfortable (to say the least) about all the recent changes to disability payments. I think your right, to quote her own words, the Tories are looking like the nasty party again.

          • bluedog

            Fear of hard Brexit would a factor too.

          • CliveM

            Yep I think once you get beyond the “true believers ” most are wanting a pragmatic resolution to Brexit and quickly.

          • Anton

            Not nasty enough. The Welfare State needs dismantling as a matter of urgency as it is used for electoral bribery nowadays.

          • bluedog

            True. But you can’t tell those who vote for their money that, otherwise very sensibly, they’re not going to vote for you.

          • CliveM

            If that had been proposed we would ‘celebrating’ a Corbyn government today.

          • Mike Stallard

            Austerity?
            Approaching £2,000,000,000,000 in debt as we are, much of it going on hand-outs to the deserving and indeed undeserving poor, you simply cannot talk of austerity. Compared with Mr Brown, the Conservatives are Father Christmas.

  • Dreadnaught

    For the sake of the economy and the Uk’s world status, there has to be another Referendum on Brexit and open to the 16 year-olds. It is their future to call. Oldies such as myself at least must stand aside, swallow our patriotic pride and let it be.
    We don’t need another parish pump election while such a momentous decision lies flapping and floundering on the world stage. We can’t plan our domestic affairs while this matter lacks the resolve of dedicated politicians to fight the EU. This has to be the priority. Then by all means call another General Election.

    • Good God you must be drunk? Leaving the decisions to 16 yr old kids???

      • Dreadnaught

        Not at all Ms Marie. For Democracy to survive is requires the young to be aware and involved in political matters. Corbyn may have offered ‘free sweets if you vote for me’ but it will have awakened minds previously uninterested in politics. I enlisted in the army as a 16 years on the Army Junior Leaders programme when I had to wait until 21 before I could vote.

        • Sixteen year olds don’t know their own minds, they think they know it all, but are only embarking on life. Eighteen is bad enough. Sixteen year olds are naïve and unquestioning and seek to be part of a group. so of course they are following unquestioningly the Pied Piper Comrade Corbynov.
          Let’s have no more of this nonsense from you.

          • Dreadnaught

            Ha ha. I have to disagree that 16 year olds are as dumb as we were at that age.

          • Most of them hold strong left wing ideas and are quick to hurl abuse and name calling when you question and criticise them.

          • David

            They are dumber than you were, because their educational environments are so much more leftist.

          • Dreadnaught

            All the more reason to get stuck in before the Corbynistas beat us to it.

          • Anton

            At 16 you think the next bullet will never have your name on it…

    • IanCad

      Amongst the many thoughtful and admirable posts you have presented over the years, there have been, salted within, a few headshakers; this one takes the cake!!
      When I was sixteen I would have voted for Corbyn. By the time I was eighteen I knew more than I ever would.
      Really Dred, the suggestion is absurd. Bring back The forty Shilling Freeholder; Failing that, limit the franchise to male heads of households. Democracy is bad enough, don’t make it even worse!

      • Dreadnaught

        We are living in the fast age of internet and crowd funding, concepts that were completely unknown to us as 16 year olds. If mainstream politics are to survive, then these guys are the ones we have to engage with to get them on board.
        This generation has to be courted by the older ones before the likes of Corbyn flim-flam their way to power. The young are the Future.

        • IanCad

          This young generation has been courted since the day they entered the public education system. They are programmed to follow the way of the collective.

          • Dreadnaught

            Not sure exactly what you mean here Ian.

          • bluedog

            Ian can answer for himself, but the long march through the institutions is starting to pay dividends when a Marxist revanchist and nonentity like Corbyn can seem like a viable leadership option.

          • Dreadnaught

            All the more reason for realism to grab their attention Mr Blue.

          • IanCad

            The teaching industry is almost entirely leftist. It is under their influence the young form their misconceptions and their inerrancy.

          • Dreadnaught

            I fully agree; all the more reason to step in and stop the rot rather than do nothing and leave it to the Lefties.

          • Anton

            Quite. The best description of Corbyn I ever read was that he looks like a 1970s geography teacher.

        • Paul Greenwood

          Time to restrict the franchise actually. Far too many people vote who do not understand the issues

          • Dreadnaught

            Sounds more Fascist than Democratic.

          • Paul Greenwood

            Not really. Fascism is where you use Sentimentalism and Emotion to sway the Masses rather than Rerason

          • Dreadnaught

            So Hitler and Mussolini were sentimentalists?
            Fascism and Totalitarianism are fundamentally the same. Stalinism, Islamism, Feudalism – same methodology of brutal authoritarianism, the polar opposite of Democracy, none of which use sentimentalism and emotion, but always apply the restriction of universal suffrage.
            In early-19th-century Britain very few people had the right to vote. A 1780 survey revealed that the electorate in England and Wales consisted of just 214,000 people – less than 3% of the total population of approximately 8 million. In Scotland the electorate was even smaller: in 1831 4,500 men, out of a population of more than 2.6 million people, were entitled to vote in parliamentary elections. Large industrial cities like Leeds, Birmingham and Manchester did not have a single MP between them, whereas ‘rotten boroughs’ such as Dunwich in Suffolk (which had a population of 32 in 1831) were still sending two MPs to Westminster. The British electoral system was unrepresentative and outdated.

            And you are advocating this?

          • Paul Greenwood

            Hitler was a “Romantic demagogue” as Oswald Spengler stated. If you cannot see that in Hitler you know so very little about him. As for Mussolini, a very intelligent man – a paid agent of MI6 in WW1 and a friend of Rosa Luxemburg and avid debater with V I Lenin.

            What proportion of the literate population could not vote ? What proportion of the property owing population could not vote ? there is no evidence that OMOV has improved society or kept nations out of major wars.

            The greatest wars in history occurred when the masses were mobilised.

          • Dreadnaught

            You know quite well you used the expression ‘sentimentalist’; that was what responded to and what lead us to the current electoral system. Promote Fascism if you wish, but lets have a bit of honesty from you rather than wriggling on the hook.

          • Paul Greenwood

            Mass Media Politics is riddled with Sentimentalism and Emotion – that is how Edward Bernays laid out the plan. It is Mass-Manipulation and has produced serial disasters

    • CliveM

      There is a real schizophrenia about how society view young people, particularly 16 year olds. Officially not allowed to smoke or go into a pub, but can marry and it is now proposed help decide the fate of this country.

      • Paul Greenwood

        marry with parental permission. If 16 years can vote they should vote for the Adult Minimum Wage

      • Anton

        You’re old enough to kill
        But not for voting
        You do’t believe in war
        But what’s that gun you’re toting?

        • Dreadnaught

          Love the old protest songs.

        • CliveM

          Yes indeed. I can’t remember but I don’t think 16 year olds are any longer allowed in the front line?

          • James Bolivar DiGriz

            I am pretty sure it is 18 for the front line. IIRC this was changed after some 17 year old(s) were killed in NI.

        • Royinsouthwest

          I hope that we are not on the Eve of Destruction.

          • Anton

            She was to be found in Genesis 3.

    • David

      Where is the factual evidence that children, minors, make good, sound adult judgements ?
      All the research into psychology demonstrates that the human brain is ruled by emotions, hormones and peer group pressure. Factor in the overwhelmingly left wing, pie in the sky, attitudes of the educational “blob” that are working very hard to program their young minds with unrealistic nonsense and you have a situation where lowering the age of voting to 16 is to invite disaster. Today’s young do not taste the reality of the market place and employment until far later than previous generations. The only reason it was lowered from the previous 21 to 18 was to boost the left wing vote. What you advocate is suicidal !

      • Dreadnaught

        Where is the factual evidence that children, minors, make good, sound adult judgements ?

        You could make the same comment about adults who vote purely on tribal loyalties.

        • Paul Greenwood

          So why 16 ? what is wrong with 14 ?

          • bluedog

            Nah, go for 11-plus.

          • Dreadnaught

            What to the pervy Jesuits say – give men the child at seven?

          • Royinsouthwest

            Is this a Dutch auction?

      • Dreadnaught

        The Left as has been said have control of the education system and you appear to be abandoning the younger generation to them without a fight back.

    • Paul Greenwood

      So disenfranchise people like you and let teens make decisions. Maybe you should be simply ignored ?

      • Dreadnaught

        I largely think I am, but I am talking about the prospect of a life changing referendum in the primary case, which if young minds are as fertile to manipulation as many suggest, then therein lies the same opportunity in insert the wisdom of experience.

  • michaelkx

    oops who saw this coming? I agree with your Grace it should have been Brexit, and nothing else.

    • IanCad

      And a return of the right to speak without fear of prosecution.

  • Typhoon Tina

    Terry May went to the country for a bigger majority, and ended up with a lesser majority, hahaha.

  • Paul Greenwood

    Quite amazing that May has been a professional politician since 1979 and is so bad at it. Didn’t she see that Cameron only got into government in 2010 with Lib Dem support ? Did she not see how Cameron squeezed a slender majority in 2015 with a Referendum Pledge ? What made her think she would sail into big majority territory with carte blanche ?

    It is surreal. People know things went disastrously wrong in 2007-2008 and outside the Southeast NO REGION has recovered…….but she thought Cult of Personality was the way forward instead of broader base ?

    Not so bad if DUP join in and ensure a proper negotiation but if David Davis were to walk matters could get seriously out of hand

    • The polls at the time gave her the idea when they published that 21% Tory lead, but polls are not always right and she failed to take into account her own lack of ability to stage a positive, vibrant and engaging campaign.

      • Royinsouthwest

        The election was not really a “snap election.” The long drawn out campaign allowed plenty of time for blunders by both sides, e.g. every time Diane Abbott opened her mouth. However Labour’s blunders did not seem to influence the voters much.

        • Anton

          Because Labour voters are bribed by the Welfare State.

        • Yes, it’s flabbergasting how Diane Abbott won.

          • Dreadnaught

            It’s racist vote for a racist, what can you expect.

      • CliveM

        The problem wasn’t the polls, the problem was her arrogance and complacency.

    • Royinsouthwest

      She thought that Corbyn was a colossal electoral liability for the Labour Party and he, John McDonnell and Diane Abbott certainly should have been easy opponents but she seriously underestimated Corbyn’s anti-establishment appeal. Theresa May has made Marxism respectable again. Margaret Thatcher must be turning in her grave.

      In fairness to May I also seriously underestimated Corbyn’s appeal.

    • Mrs Proudie of Barchester

      Cult of Personality only works if you have one.

  • Typhoon Tina

    ‘Ukip’s vote collapsed dramatically – dropping by 10.8 points to just 1.9%.

    Party leader Paul Nuttall came third in his target seat of Boston and Skegness, and several candidates lost their deposits.

    Mr Nuttall gave no interviews tonight, but is expected to give a press conference on Friday morning.’

    Tory plant Carswell did his job well.

    • Ivan M

      Farage is like one of those pump and artists in the stock markets. He got out at the peak with his reputation intact.

      • Do you mean pump and dump? No, I think he needed a break, he must have been exhausted.

        • Ivan M

          Yes. I have corrected my post. For what it is worth the one businessman I know from the UK was very unhappy about Farage’s Brexit campaign. He prefered to be in Europe for his children to be able to work anywhere in the EU. This would be the opinion of many if not most UK citizens who do business overseas.

          • Royinsouthwest

            But it is not the opinion of most British people who face competition for jobs from foreigners who are allowed to work anywhere in the EU.

          • Ivan M

            It is a balancing act. If there are few jobs near home one just have to travel. That is the way it is in this integrated world we have.

          • Anton

            He would have wanted to be in the single currency too, I expect.

          • Ivan M

            Money is fungible Euro, pounds or bitcoins. As long as there is lots of it few will complain.

          • Anton

            There was lots of money in Germany in the early 1920s and plenty of people complained!

          • Children work?

          • James Bolivar DiGriz

            If that is true then your friend, at best, know nothing about the state of the EU.

            “He prefered to be in Europe for his children to be able to work anywhere in the EU”
            Youth unemployment rate:
            Greece, 45%
            Spain 42%
            Italy 35%
            Cyprus 30%
            Croatia 29%
            Portugal 25%
            France 24%
            Romania 20%
            Finland 20%
            Euro area average 19%

            EU average 17%

            UK 12%
            Hungary 11%
            Austria 11%
            Netherlands 10%
            Germany 7%
            Czech Republic 1%

  • Mrs Proudie of Barchester

    Well, I’m sorry, but this was totally predictable. All of the points raised by His Grace in he article above contributed to this debacle, and Mrs. May – who has never been sure-footed once during her political career – has once again put her kitten-shoes into the poo. There will be no meaningful Brexit, which probably was the plan all along.

    • Royinsouthwest

      If Brexit gets scuppered will May have a new career as an EU/Zollverein commissioner, I wonder?

    • bluedog

      ‘There will be no meaningful Brexit, which probably was the plan all along.’ Disagree. All the signs are that TM meant what she said about Brexit. The problem is much of the electorate has become a hotbed of cold feet.

      • Dreadnaught

        I never have cold feet in a hot bed.

        • Mrs Proudie of Barchester

          If ever you have hot feet in a cold bed let us know…

          • Dreadnaught

            Never take me boots off until the sheets warm up.

      • Mrs Proudie of Barchester

        But what did she say about Brexit, other than ‘Brexit is Brexit?’ She gave the game away latterly by saying he wanted a deep and meaningful relationship with the EU when the Referendum made it clear people wanted out, plain and simple.

        • bluedog

          There’s no realistic alternative to a D&M relationship with the EU. It just has to be at arm’s length on terms that do not compromise sovereignty.

        • Dreadnaught

          Cameron has fewer balls than May. The perameters of the Referendum were a shambles, constructed by himself and Ozzy. I give respect to May for at least stepping up when the stepped down.

    • CliveM

      She’s dumped us all in the poo!

      I’ve decided to spend the next five years drunk and depending on circumstances then, I will review at that time.

      So bugger the Earl Grey, pass the Port.

      • bluedog

        Rum Hobnobs?

        • CliveM

          It’s a start.

        • Anton

          Irish coffee for breakfast…

      • William Lewis

        Poor Earl Grey. It’s not his fault, Clive.

        • CliveM

          You know I had a bet with myself as to how lo It would take for someone to come up w that! I thought of just saying tea, but it seemed weak.

          • William Lewis

            Quite right, Clive. Nothing worse than weak tea. 🙂

          • Anton

            Nah. Weak tea, strong coffee, and NEVER the other way round.

          • William Lewis

            Gnats pee? *shudders*

          • Anton

            The Chinese understand tea, the Arabs coffee.

          • Pubcrawler

            The Arabs I met in Jericho understood tea. Strong, black and sweet.

          • Anton

            That was coffee! How many pubs had you been in that day?

          • Pubcrawler

            Not many pubs in Jericho, oddly enough. (I wasn’t talking about the Jericho in Oxf*rd.) It was tea. If it were coffee it would not have got past my sense of smell. I’d rather drink Maccabee.

          • Anton

            If the tea there is strong black and sweet then I reckon it proves my point!

      • Royinsouthwest

        Make sure you don’t copy the Government Inspector. He said yesterday that he would be tempted to drink floor polish. Perhaps that is why we have not heard from him so far today!

      • Ivan M

        Something good has come out of the elections for you.

      • Mrs Proudie of Barchester

        I’m opting for gin….and sod the Band of Hope….

        • CliveM

          Just in case they turn up, load the blunderbuss.

    • David

      Take heart Mrs Proudie !
      There may yet be a way to save the day !
      A coalition with the excellent DUP, which is very likely, would remind the Conservatives what conservatism is about. The DUP are far, far more conservative than the Conservatives have been for decades.

      • Mrs Proudie of Barchester

        You could be right…we shall see

  • Anton

    This happened because Corbyn guaranteed Brexit, making the election about everything else – and making the Tories vulnerable, as the two parties have roughly equal support on other issues.

    But look on the bright side:

    * If nobody is at home in Westminster for the Brexit negotiations then there will be panic in Brussels as the default is a hard Brexit, which suits right-thinking Brits well but not the Continent.

    * We have been talking about wanting less government for a long time; now we shall get it, until the next election at least. I’d open a book on when that is…

    In the absence of a genuine Tory to lead the Conservative Party and be PM, this situation is not so bad. There might even be a worldwide financial crisis greater than 2008 that wrecks the tax-and-welfare system, the source of many of our deeper problems. And homegrown militant Islam is going to cause itself to be singled out fairly soon.

    So we are far from having reason to prefer an Army coup at this point. Chin up!

    • CliveM

      I don’t find any of that reassuring.

      • Anton

        Have a drink and read it again!

    • IanCad

      Excellent point Anton; We Conservatives sometimes fail to realize that the principles of independence and dignity are not solely confined to the CP.

    • Ivan M

      Corbyn could “guarantee” Brexit since he would not need to deliver on it. Brexit is the albatross on the Conservatives’ neck.

      • Anton

        The British do not readily take to the streets like continental rabble, but there are limits and reneging on Brexit together with Farage’s comments might do it.

        • Ivan M

          But those would be the hard core elements. Brexit as understood by the Conservatives is not the same as that for Labour. They want a centre-left Europe. If they get it they will stay.

          • Anton

            The people who voted Brexit in the last election and Labour yesterday just want Brexit.

          • Ivan M

            I have to disagree.

  • IanCad

    Oh Yes! YG, it was about Brexit and the remainers in the CP are delighted. Of course TM must stay on, so opined Phillip Lee MP for Bracknell.
    “–it is time for pause and reflection on our approach to Brexit and TM is the best person to lead us into new negotiations–“ The Remainers have won.
    Never mind Corbyn, to a great degree what you see is what you get. No! The danger lies within our own CP camp. David Davis must become PM, otherwise we will remain a supplicant to the EU Beast for another generation.

    • David

      A coalition with the most excellent DUP will strengthen the conservative element still within the Conservative Party.

  • Dreadnaught

    Looks like Mrs May did indeed shoot her own fox.
    — help us.

  • Anton

    Let’s go for four figures in the number of comments and break His Grace’s record! (Held, I believe, by Mrs Proudie in the 900s.)

    • IanCad

      Unless like me, other posters will blast out a few scribbles as a means to prevent a stroke; and then go back to work, watch TV, or take a nap.

  • David

    Is there a sliver lining to the GE ? Possibly yes.
    The DUP, the party eager to form a coalition with Mrs May’s reduced PCP, is a staunch social and fiscal conservative party. If this coalition happens, which seems very likely, the DUP will remind the Conservative Party what conservatism is really about.
    Over here we tend not to know much about the politics of Northern Ireland. There’s an interesting piece on it, on Breitbart London.

    • Anton

      Thank you; that’s interesting. Link please!

    • William Lewis

      I’m thinking along the same lines, David. Here’s hoping.

    • magnolia

      Well the DUP must be thanking God, while the ex (?) IRA supporters must watch a tiny no. of DUP supporters wielding significant power. Interesting.

      • James Bolivar DiGriz

        Not only that but they are helping the Cons & DUP.

        As SF don’t take their seats *and* their number went up to seven, the number needed for an effective overall majority is now 322.

  • Martin

    The king’s heart is a stream of water in the hand of the LORD;
    he turns it wherever he will.
    (Proverbs 21:1 [ESV])

    • Mrs Proudie of Barchester

      “Yeah, for as the Righteous May walk towards the Sunlit Uplands, the serpent of utter incompetence is ever there to snap at a well-turned ankle” (Proudie 32:1).

  • layreader

    Honestly, YG, I really thought better of you than to indulge in all the speculative hindsight that the rest of the corrupt political world has been doing. Teresa May has most votes and most seats, and that’s usually the test of who has won an election. At least she had the guts to try to appeal across the board, and not try and woo spotty students with promises of free university for life. (A policy, incidentally, introduced by Jezza’s forebears and consistently supported by all major parties). JC must be silently giving thanks that he doesn’t actually have to implement all the wild and uncosted ideas that appeared in his manifesto – that might have been rather embarrassing.
    And as for the Remainers – more than 90% of the vote was for parties that support Brexit. No contest there.

    • David

      That’s the spirit !
      And greetings from another “Reader’.

  • CliveM

    There is a lesson to be learned from the Scottish independence vote, EU referendum and this General Election. If all you can offer is negativity and the opposition are offering some sort of hope, you aren’t going to do well. In all three of these votes, big swings were achieved by those offering a positive vision.

    What did May offer? A free vote on hunting with hounds.

    • bluedog

      It was the same in France with Macron and Le Pen. He was positive, she was negative.

    • Royinsouthwest

      That does not only apply to peaceful politics; it also applies to terrorism. The terrorists know what they stand for even though most of our politicians and the media collude in pretending that they are not really standing for anything at all.

      In reality it is our politicians, with a few exceptions – some honourable, others less so, who do not stand for anything in particular and the media reflect the moral vacuum.

      Jihadists are ready to fill that vacuum while the politicians and media fret about a “right wing backlash” and hope that talking about “not letting hate win” makes them sound both compassionate and wise.

  • David

    Paul Nuttall has just done the right thing and resigned.
    Nigel will only return if Brexit is endangered.

    • Anton

      Now he can lead the Tory party!

      • David

        Nice thought, but although he was a good deputy he’s not top leadership material.

        • Royinsouthwest

          Perhaps Nigel could join the Tories and then lead them!

  • magnolia

    It shows the total failure of Tony Blair’s “education, education, education” that so many young people voted for people who supported those who were prepared to murder their parents and grandparents.

    They have gone through a system that has more programmed them than educated them, and most are incapable of much useful thought, though having degrees by the bucketload.

    Am I bitter? Yes. Honourable people like Airey neave were blown up and yet many of this generation don’t care at all. The nation’s MPs of all parties at the time got regular death threats, and had to check under their cars regularly for bombs, but this later generation appear neither to know nor to care.

    • Thomas Moon

      To be fair, politicians didn’t seem to care much at the time, either. We got the same platitudes wheeled out, “we’ll never give in to terror”, “we’ll hunt down these evil cowards”, etc., but no one ever really took on the IRA which, let’s face it, would have been far, far easier to defeat than ISIS. And weren’t many of the mass murderers of the IRA let out after a few years by Blair under the good Friday Agreement?

      • Royinsouthwest

        Actually British troops and the RUC did take on the IRA with quite a bit of success. Even then however our Quislings were vocal in support of the enemy as shown by the controversy they stirred up after the SAS shot and killed a group of IRA terrorists in Gibraltar.

        • Thomas Moon

          I’m sure the army did the best they could in Northern Ireland, but it was, at best, a containment exercise. If the army and intelligence services had been allowed to go after the IRA the way, for example, that the Israeli army goes after terrorists, crossing the border into Southern Ireland, where necessary, many lives might have been saved.

    • David

      Michael Gove tried to address those problems within “the Blob”, but Cameron wimped out and sacked him – disgusting weak Cameron !

      • Anton

        Exactly.

        • Linus

          That’s right, blame it all on Cameron. May’s incompetent and wooden performance had nothing to do with her dismal result. It’s all Cameron’s fault.

          You have the prime minister you deserve. But for how long? Will by-elections finish her off or will it be a Tory coup? You’re in for months of uncertainty and instability with the spectre of another election constantly looming. An election that could bring Corbyn to power…

          Mouah hah haaah!

          • Anton

            Even you say “could”; glad you are learning to hedge your bets a little. Uncertainty is great – we have suffered hyperactive government for too long and this will stop it, while chaos over negotiating authority with Brussels will likely lead to a hard Brexit.

            Yippee!

    • Busy Mum

      Their level of ‘caring’ depends on the level of protected characteristics pertaining to the victim. As far as many of these youngsters are concerned, the only good white male is a dead one.

  • David

    If there’s a coalition with the DUP, which seems very likely, the nature of the Irish land border will be significant in the forthcoming EU negotiations.

    • Royinsouthwest

      If the Republic of Ireland were to leave the EU that would make it much easier to abolish border controls, or at least keep them to an absolute minimum, between the UK and the Republic.

      • David

        Indeed. I hope it happens and Ireland joins the Commonwealth too.

        • CliveM

          More chance of a May landslide!

          • bluedog

            Actually, no. If the Eurozone implodes Ireland will face some difficult choices. Joining a federal UK on the same terms a devolved Scotland may well emerge as an attractive option for the Irish republic. In that case, it would be difficult for Ulster unionists to oppose reunification. An important pointer would be the emergence of Unionism as a policy in one of the existing Irish political parties. It could easily happen.

          • CliveM

            To much history. Your argument is rational but could not happen. It would result in violence.

          • bluedog

            We’ll see.

          • CliveM

            Id happy to be wrong.

  • Thomas Moon

    “With no majority in the House of Commons, the ‘Great Repeal Bill’ fades away and grammar schools whither. With no majority, it’s hard to see how Brexit will now mean Brexit” – perhaps, just perhaps, that’s what Mrs May wanted?

    • Slim Jim

      This could be the start of a great conspiracy theory!

      • IanCad

        Never attribute to malice what can better be explained by incompetence.

    • Busy Mum

      I admit to thinking that as soon as she called the election. She is a Remainer at heart and does not wish to implement Brexit herself, neither does she wish anyone else to do it.

  • David

    The Brexit backing newspaper, the “Daily Express” report a meeting timetabled for 12.30 pm ‘tween Mrs May and Her Majesty. It confidently asserts that the DUP are backing the Conservatives, which was expected. I reckon DUP’s price will be £ for Northern Ireland and a suitable soft land border with the Republic.
    Hopefully we will not get a soft brexit, otherwise the problem will have to be revisited. My good friends in Norway have impressed on me the perils of being in such a trade relationship with the EU.

    • Manfarang

      Do you have any good friends in Switzerland?

  • David

    Assuming that the DUP form a coalition with the Conservatives, which seems very likely indeed, then that event, together with the remarkable rally of the Conservatives in Scotland, means that two of the three devolved areas, Scotland and Ireland, have saved England and Wales from a fate approaching death – the election of a Corbyn led government.
    If all this comes to pass, then it’ll be three cheers for Scotland and N.Ireland !
    That will be proof of “Stronger together” !

    • William Lewis

      That’s quite funny. I’m sure the SNP will relish the idea of Scotland being the saviour of the Tory party.

      • CliveM

        It’ll give Sturgeon permanent heart burn!

        • Pubcrawler

          How will we tell the difference?

          • CliveM

            She’ll look even more miserable.

          • Pubcrawler

            Ah, bulldog chewing two wasps. Gotcha.

          • CliveM

            Whilst being colonicaly cleansed.

          • Pubcrawler

            Good-bye, lunch…

        • James60498 .

          Without Scotland there would have been a Tory majority.

    • Linus

      With DUP support May has a majority of … 2!

      What’s even more dire for her is that she was almost beaten by Corbyn.

      Corbyn!

      The most ineffective Labour leader since Michael Foote gave her a complete hiding and left her clinging on for dear life in a position so precarious that any hope of lasting out the year looks completely forlorn.

      Will she ever recover from the humiliation?

      She’s two by-elections away from oblivion. Her days are numbered.

      • James Bolivar DiGriz

        Sums not your strong point I see.

        650 seats, so 326 are needed for a majority of *2*. Every one up from 326 increases the majority by 2 not 1, as it also take one away from the opposition.

        As SF don’t take their seats the effective overall majority is actually 13.

        • Manfarang

          There will be no majority as there will be no formal coalition between the two parties, however the DUP will ask for policy concessions in return for its support.

          • James Bolivar DiGriz

            There is something very wrong with you.

            You are the only one to mention a formal coalition. Linus said “With DUP support May has a majority …”, not formal coalition but support.

            And it was the faulty arithmetic that I was clearly talking about, not the political arrangements that have not been announced and that they have probably not even started talking about.

          • Manfarang

            Earlier, the DUP leader herself, Arlene Foster, doubted Ms May could stay in No 10, telling the BBC: “I don’t know”, adding: “I think it will be difficult for her to survive.”

      • Chefofsinners

        Linus, old boy, ‘hung parliament’ does not mean what you think it means.

        • Linus

          Are you sure about that?

          May herself has boasted about the size of her testicles. Who knows what else she’s hiding under those god-awful clothes.

    • Slim Jim

      The situation in Scotland is about the only silver lining! Hopefully, talk of Indyref2 will calm down.

      • Mrs Proudie of Barchester

        Indyref2 – I deplore Newspeak…

        • Slim Jim

          My apologies if I upset you Ma’am.

          • Mrs Proudie of Barchester

            No no, you haven’t at all, its just that I cannot abide this modern text-speak we are all subjected to…goodness, Slim Jim, am not upset with you at all!

          • Slim Jim

            I’m so glad about that. I don’t like Newspeak either, but I was being economical with my keyboard!

    • James60498 .

      Of course without Scotland there would have been a Conservative Majority.

  • David

    Good for you, although I never drink before 6pm, three days per week – boring I’ll admit !

    • Anton

      What time of the morning do you drink before on the other three days?

  • Thomas Moon

    The saddest thing for me is the collapse of the UKIP vote. They are not a perfect party, but far and away the best of a bad lot. A shame they couldn’t transform themselves into a party seen to be relevant after the Brexit vote.

    • Dreadnaught

      I hear Nuttall has resigned.

      • Manfarang

        So Farage is back in charge doing a rebrand.

    • len

      Nigel Farage is the UKIP party. No one else can lead UKIP apparently.

    • Anton

      They were a one-cause party and they won.

    • vsscoles

      They became a complete and utter shambles after Farage left. A pity, as they tended to take Labour votes and thus keep Labour from winning seats.

  • Slim Jim

    The reason it ended up like this is that there is no real Conservative party now. They’re still playing the games that New Labour started. The Conservative campaign was dire, and it seems that many people in the party were shut out of formulating the manifesto. A big mistake. Also, it is easy for the opposition to promise the earth, but many people don’t seem to realise how dire a state the economy is still in. If Corbyn & co were in power, it would be a one-way ticket to economic Armageddon. I suspect that the men in grey suits will be knocking on her door soon, but do we really want another election?

    • Ray Spring

      Theresa can stay ‘for the duration’ after she has, after considerable thought, resigned as PM. No need for an election. Normal service to be resumed as soon as possible.

  • Anna

    There might be a positive side to all this. It is still a conservative win. According to Raheem Kassam, Theresa May was hoping to get a big majority, which she didn’t really need, to limit the influence of hard Brexiteers within her own party. Now she is forced to form a coalition with the DUP which stands for Christian values- their influence in the government might be a good thing.

    • David

      Yes indeed !

    • Damaris Tighe

      That would explain why CCO parachuted remainer candidates into many constituencies.

  • Anton

    That’s two Tory PMs who have supported gay marriage and come unstuck in short order…

    • Anna

      True. God is not mocked – both claimed to be Christians.

      • David

        Amen to that !

    • Chefofsinners

      You can add Andy Murray to that list.

  • Anton

    Teresa May would have done better than Theresa May!

  • Trevor Griffiths

    You mean you weren’t praying already? Many of the previous articles here have touched on May’s serious shortcomings. Many of them seem at least slightly divergent from her professed faith. So if I could choose one word to explain her failure, it would be ‘lukewarm’. I’m sure the reference to the church in Laodicea will not be lost on His Grace’s readers.

  • Anton

    You’ve checked who Teresa May is?

    • CliveM

      No! I thought you were just picking up my spelling!

      • Anton

        I suggest you do!

        • CliveM

          I wouldn’t of thought you would be into glamour models.

          • Anton

            It’s just that I made the same mistake you did on a google search when she became PM, and was educated.

  • David

    Perhaps now the soft left Conservative Party will listen to the Bow Group and its excellent plan to broaden the party’s base and modernise the leadership contests. But first they need to become conservative again. The DUP can only help that.
    The other plus is that the Left Ukip group, The Executive, has now been humiliated, and maybe the party will return to its original Nigel-like positioning on the right/left spectrum.

  • vsscoles

    It is of some comfort to note that the author of the bonkers manifesto, one Ben Gummer, lost his seat in last night’s carnage. Was he the unfortunate Gummer offspring who was force fed a beef burger by his father at the height of the Mad Cow disease crisis? In any event he, and those who approved his proposed multiple raids on pensioners, ought now to be feeling the wrath of the party.

    • Sarky

      Ha ha he was my local mp. Glad hes gone, means we can scrap his vanity projects and spend money on what’s needed. The labour guy who won is well known and will do alot of good .

      • David

        So you’re near Ipswich – I am between Newmarket and Bury.

        • Sarky

          Yep, Suffolk born and bred.

        • TropicalAnglican

          Have you ever bumped into Lord Tebbit — his residence is listed as Bury St Edmunds in his Wikipedia entry

        • Anton

          Have you seen the World War I memorial windows in Swaffham Prior church? I must say I never expected to see women filling shells with high explosive depicted in stained glass in a church window.

    • Maalaistollo

      It was to his daughter that he gave the burger. Although not infected with BSE it may have contained significant quantities of hormones, if she later became Ben Gummer. Dr Spooner would have had an interesting time with those names.

      • Paul Greenwood

        Well with Foot & Mouth in 2001 costing 10 million cows and sheep and £8 billion to UK; and BSE costing £4 billion in 1998 the Blair Era was very expensive even before Iraq and two aircraft carriers

    • David

      Yes – another Blue Prince.

  • Demon Teddy Bear

    They got arrogant and lazy. Everyone hated them.

    She will be forced to resign soon. Will it be Boris this time?

    • IanCad

      Dear Lord! Please not Boris.

      • CliveM

        Agree, but if not Boris who? The cupboard seems bare to me.

        • Merchantman

          Been A listed to oblivion by Cameron.

          • CliveM

            True. Wonder of Ken Clarke fancies another try!!

          • Paul Greenwood

            Yes he seems just the man for BreXit…….he was always in favour of withdrawal wasn’t he ? (sarc.)

          • CliveM

            I wasn’t being serious. Trying to be light hearted.

        • Maalaistollo

          Jacob Rees-Mogg. I believe he once proposed that it should be illegal to play guitars in church. Can’t expect to find anyone more sound than that.

          • Anton

            Just illegal to strum would be right. Playing the things is fine.

          • CliveM

            Sadly to posh for today.

          • Manfarang

            Why should the Devil have all the best tunes?

          • Alison Bailey Castellina

            I heard a former Bishop recently admit that he was one of the clergy who encouraged the strumming of guitars in churches and within months he and his colleagues panicked when they realised guitar ‘folk’ music was rendering extinct traditional church music. Hence guitars in churches are all a bit of a clergy mistake which got wildly out of hand. My own pet hate is electronic music, pseudo pop singers using microphones and worst of all, drum kits.

          • Maalaistollo

            It is indeed a tragedy that, in evangelical circles, many of those below the age of, say, 55, know very few proper hymns. I was told about a group of over 20 ordinands at a well-known theological college, of whom only two or three had heard of the hymn ‘Glorious things of thee are spoken.’ If this is representative of the future clergy we appear within the space of less than 50 years to have lost some 1500 years of hymnody.

        • Anton

          Two Cabinet ministers of the day voted against gay marriage and one was also sound on global warming while Environment minister. He was sacked by Cameron, of course, but take a punt on Owen Paterson.

          • CliveM

            Can’t even remember him. Need charisma and soundness. Someone to excite the mob.

        • IanCad

          I certainly think David Davis deserves it. Bring in some sound backbenchers; Maybe John Baron, David Davies, men who uphold the principles of liberty and self-determination. I’m sure there are plenty of others in the same mould

          • CliveM

            I had heard he is good in a crisis, but easily bored and distracted by the day to day grind.

          • wisestreligion

            David Davis campaigned against a restriction on civil liberties that affected a few suspected terrorists. Does he oppose the hate crime and equalities legislation that oppress the rest of us?

          • IanCad

            I can only assume he would – given just a modicum of consistency. If he doesn’t, then my post will be yet another one where I have put my foot in my mouth.

          • David

            Yes indeed, David Davis is the man.

      • Ray Spring

        Can Boris catch Mice?

  • Anton

    We had two Islamic terror attacks during the later stages of the campaign. If she had said that she would take specified and genuine action against the rise of Islam, how many votes would she have won?

    • DSERIES

      But we dare not mention the elephant in the room!

    • She’d have romped home.

  • Merchantman

    Read Zoe William in the Guardian- Eight reasons why Corbyn Robbed TM of a landslide. Always study this sort of thing to learn how to turn a sharp lesson to good effect.
    If you call an election you’ve got to be ready for it. Seems TM was’nt. The opposition always have time on their hands. TM was gadding about at the G7 and NATO conferences. Together with 3 Islamic murder attacks No Wonder she couldn’t campaign effectively, notwithstanding she tried to do it all alone,
    probably not the way to go.

    • DSERIES

      Young gullibles who have no memory a young Corbyn!!

    • She failed to prepare for it, therefore she prepared to fail.

  • CliveM

    Of course the person to blame for this is HG. He prayed fro a Corbyn labour leadership victory!!

  • Mrs May decided to tell the country what was good for it, rather than finding out what voters want. “Cut down the pensioners to size, and charge them for health care by seizing their houses. Put an end to those winter fuel payments.” Only 24,000 a year are dying prematurely of the cold each winter! Now contrast with Labour’s campaign and manifesto. They knew what people wanted and promised to deliver it, even if it meant yet more borrowing. If they had a credible leader rather than Sinn Fein’s ally Corbyn, they would now be choosing a Cabinet. Will Conservative HQ and the parliamentary party learn any lessons from yesterday’s debacle? I doubt it.

    • IanCad

      I have to wonder how many more seats Labour would have won were they to have ditched Dianne Abbott in a timely manner.

      • Royinsouthwest

        She seems popular with members of ethnic minorities who are actually the majority in some parts of London. It seems a lot of non-whites have nothing against racism provided it is not directed against the group they belong to.

  • Proverbs 16:33. ‘The lot is cast into the lap, but its every decision is from the LORD.’

    Christians must certainly be in prayer for the future of the Nation. At my church’s prayer meeting on Wednesday, we prayed that the result would be the one that would most glorify God. From a Brexit point of view the result is just about the worst possible. From the point of view of the stability of the Nation it is almost as bad. Yet perhaps this uncertainty will cause people to lift their eyes from complacency and materialism to spiritual issues.
    .
    Britain is ripe for judgement. Regardless of who might have won the election, we are still killing 200,000 unborn children each year, there is a vast epidemic of STDs amongst our young (and not-so-young) people, self-harming is endemic within our schools and suicides are increasing. Governments have proved utterly unable to manage these crises. Only the word of God, forcefully and fearlessly preached by Bible-believing Christians up and down the country can make a difference.
    .
    So yes, we need to be praying; we need to be asking God to show mercy on the nation- a mercy she does not deserve. We need to be praying for revival and a spirit of repentance in the land; but more than that we need to be praying for God to revive His true Church and help her to find her voice.

    • Paul Greenwood

      Not sure it is such a bad result. With the DUP on board the EU will not play Dublin off against London, far too dangerous ! So it may be time to embrace DCFTA or EEA and stabilise the export sector and movement of planes, trucks and certification of pharmaceuticals. There was never any logic in abandoning the Customs Union without a proper alternative anyway.

      May might have to give way to David Davis who would probably better bring Labour votes in the Commons to the party. May built on an exposed track record at the Home Office (8 terrorist attempts in 70 days, 3 successful) by a wilful miscalculation of electoral appeal and too much power to her SpAds.

      BreXit should never have been a Conservative Party thing anyway, especially with a woman who was not originally committed. The thought of Boris Johnson at the FO or any further up the greasy pole is the truly horrific thought

      • Merchantman

        Boris is a good person to have in collegiate Government. He has led London and has personality and isn’t afraid to speak. If May had her way she’d have everyone agreeing with her and that thinking has got her where she finds herself this Friday.

        • Paul Greenwood

          Boris never “led” London – he palmed off his work to others ab=nd cultivated his £250k from DT for sounding off

    • Anton

      Ripe for judgement? It’s here already, in our midst.

    • Politically__Incorrect

      We have certainly reached a stage where turning to politicians for hope or leadership is clearly fruitless, and I don’t just mean the Conservative Party. Labour will gloat for a while but people will realise after a while they have nothing to offer but national bankruptcy – both financial and moral. I speak as someone who was a Labour supporter in my twenties. That was partly because I was too naïve to see that their talk of social justice was a sham and because the Labour Party in those days was a little more benign; it didn’t support terrorists or promote anti-Semitism for example. Yes, every Christian should be praying for this nation, for its wickedness, it’s indifference to killing (whether that’s in the womb or on the streets), and it’s obsession with self-gratification.

      • Linus

        Not to mention it’s appalling grammar…

        Oops!

    • DSERIES

      And nobody points out that a generation after abortion was legalised,we are being told that the post war generation is ageing and immigrant labor is crucial.Whatever happened to the 2.4 children guideline?

  • Hi,

    But I’m guessing (how many?) of the readership here are happy with the DUP bit – they remind me as being analogous or a UK equivalent to the Shas party of Israel – in this case representing Northern Irish Christian Evangelicals …..

    • 1650again

      Hi Hannah. Me for one.

      • Maalaistollo

        Me too.

    • vsscoles

      It is a pity that the “Conservative and Unionist Party” splits with the Unionists in the first place to become just the “Conservative Party”. And “Conservative” in quotation marks also seems about right.

      • Anton

        When people who call themselves conservative enact gay marriage you know your culture has undergone a revolution.

      • Manfarang

        The Conservatives were linked to the Official Unionist Party. There was an attempt to link up again a few years ago- UCUNF Lady Hermon didn’t agree and has since sat as an Independent Unionist.

    • David

      I am happy with the DUP – proper conservatives!

      • Manfarang

        Protestant Unionist Party.

      • I like Ian Paisley Jr a proper man, none of this “gay marriage” lark for him.

      • Chefofsinners

        Yup. Wish they would stand in England.

    • Royinsouthwest

      What is wrong with that?

      • Hi

        It was part statement and part question. I wouldn’t read anything into it about the merits or not of such a deal.

    • James60498 .

      As a Catholic with significant NI connections, I would be delighted to see a party in Government opposed to abortion and “gay marriage”.

      • Manfarang

        “Let me smell your breath first, son” –

      • Anton

        TM has assured Ruth Davidson (who believes she will marry her lesbian partner soon) that gay rights are not in jeopardy.

        • James60498 .

          I suspect that a party with 10 seats would probably have to accept that it doesn’t have much chance of reversing previous legislation, particularly when that legislation is supported by the great majority of the opposition.

          Any positive effect that they may have would be on demanding that no further legislation would be passed, such as Churches being forced to “marry” gays, or even putting pressure on the government to stop abortions that even under the present relaxed laws are illegal but allowed by the governments failure to enforce its own laws.

          But then of course as Davidson is threatening to split the Scottish Tories away, not least because she doesn’t want to leave the Single Market, that’s 13 seats that could come off any majority.

          So whose support does May need most?

    • Manfarang

      The Giant’s Causeway is 6,000 years old.

      • Anton

        Giant without a Causeway?

        • Manfarang

          The Fomhóraigh are a race of supernatural beings in Irish mythology who were sometimes described as giants and who may have originally been part of a pre-Christian pantheon.

    • IrishNeanderthal

      I see the IG is having a go at Ruth Davidson on Have the British People Taken Leave of Their Senses?

      I think that, maybe, it was not a good thing for her to have given that interview, but then, they would have stirred up a stink if she hadn’t.

      • Hi

        Just to point out if Davidson hadn’t run a different campaign , then there wouldn’t be a dozen extra Tory MPs and given the losses in England , Corbyn could have had the numbers for a minority government.

        • IrishNeanderthal

          Two things, Hannah.

          One is the danger of tendentious media questioning. Andrea Leadsom’s downfall was brought about, so I understand, by them coaxing out of her that remark about her having children and Mrs May none.

          The other is that the Conservatives are now reliant on both the Scotties and the DUP. I have many things going for Ruth Davidson, and there will be many people of bad will trying to force a breakdown on that front.

    • dannybhoy

      There’s nothing wrong with Northern Irish Evangelicals Hannah.

      • Hi

        I didn’t say there was, I simply noted that shas [Sephardi Guardians of Torah] and the DUP were similar. Both religious parties and kingmaker of their respective parliaments.

  • Hi

    Let’s face it May ran a crap campaign with a crap manifesto and took traditional conservative voters for granted.

    The failure to engage in public debate and this being a presidential style campaign , but without scrutiny or any team .
    When May said there was no magic money tree, why has the bank of England being doing this for banks and wealthy investors via QE? £600 billion plus is a lot of magic money.
    Why didn’t she do the debates ?What was she afraid of?
    Why didn’t they cost the manifesto?
    Where were the cabinet big guns e.g. Hammond, Boris, Hunt ? Rudd deserves credit for being understudy when may refused to debate.
    Why was Damian Green put out to do interviews after the attacks and not May?
    Who came up with the three mantras?
    What can we learn from the Scottish Tories?(other than making Ruth Davidson Prime Minister).
    What do conservatives stand for?
    What fool thought a brand new asset tax for elderly care was good?
    Why has parliament magically found money for massive increases in MPs salaries?
    When will austerity end?
    Why isn’t there a strategy for growth?
    Why did we even need this election?
    They’ve cut 20,000 police . I understand they’ve done the same with the defence forces. Are they really Tories? How can we defend ourselves with this

    Hopefully this will be nothing but a caretaker government, so a new party leader can take over the reins. This time there needs to be a proper debate and vote by grassroots Tories and not a coronation. But May has gambled and lost the confidence of the country. Tories need to regroup and get things alerted. Or Corbyn will be PM by December.

    • Hi Hannah

      Couldn’t agree more. At least two of the people I’ve spoken to today said they voted Labour because Corbyn seemed “nice”, even though they thought he was weak as a leader and didn’t really know what his policies were(!)

      Huge mistake by May to turn this into a personality contest, and then duck out of interviews and debates and follow the Blair/Cameron style of never giving a straight answer. It made her seem aloof and disingenuous, whereas at least Corbyn was getting out there and answering questions. It’s like they’ve learned nothing from Brexit and Trump: people are tired of slippery, double speaking politicians.

    • Royinsouthwest

      The Tory campaign team could have done with your advice!

    • John

      Only three of the above lost May her majority in my view; her decision to call an election in the first place after saying she would not, the dementia tax fiasco, and declining to debate on TV. She and her party fought a lacklustre campaign and they deserved a bruising in the polls. The one saving grace is that she will now have to govern with the DUP who, unlike many of her colleagues and May herself, are proper conservatives.

      • Paul Greenwood

        The fact that Cameron squeezed in 2015 and 2016 referendum and 2017 election for unpopular economic policies

      • Hi

        Proper SOCIAL Conservatives. There fixed that.

    • bluedog

      This is not the first time you’ve flashed your political acumen, Hannah. Are you in the right job?

    • Paul Greenwood

      Because Green like Hammond was her contemporary in OUCA at university

      • Hi

        I was asking this because Green is work and pensions Secretary.

        • Paul Greenwood

          He was Immigration Minister at Home Office and once a Financial Journalist and before that a Citibank banker and before that President of the Oxford Union and friend of Philip May

    • dannybhoy

      I am so, so disappointed in Theresa May. I had high hopes for her…

  • Chefofsinners

    The one thing the nation has clearly voted for is Therexit. Time to end this desperate clinging to power and salvage the last tatters of her dignity. The country as one cries “Jump”.

  • Merchantman

    Consider this: Arlene Foster as Queen maker. She’s a tough cookie and it will do the flabby Tories good to have someone knock some sense and one hopes love into them.The country is on the edge of a precipice, we must pray for leadership and direction. The UK needs representation from Scotland, NI and the regions to put things in perspective and give those places a voice. We’ll see.

    • Chefofsinners

      The country is on the edge of a precipice, and with Theresa May’s leadership we will take a great step forward.

      • Merchantman

        Ouch Yes or Corbyn’s Great Leap Forward.

      • Anton

        Will 2017 be a leap year?

  • David

    If the DUP demands free movement and remaining in the Single Market then it will not be a Brexit. In which case the fight for our freedom will be restarted.May is a failure as leader, so she must go !

    • What’s the alternative? Getting rid of May risks sparking off another election, and Corbyn certainly won’t deliver a ‘hard’ Brexit in No. 10.

      • Chefofsinners

        “Every Theresa that bringeth not forth good fruit is hewn down, and cast into the fire.”

  • Chefofsinners

    Does anyone remember that awful situation comedy
    Terry & June? This one’s worse:
    Theresa 8 June

    • Sarky

      What do you call Nicola Sturgeon with diarrhoea??

      Bravefart.

      • Chefofsinners

        Running for parliament.

      • Politically__Incorrect

        Going through the motions?

      • Chefofsinners

        Squittish Nationalist?
        Burns night?
        Dung parliament?
        Indy ref two-step?

    • bluedog

      Terry meets Boris, Westminster showdown…

      With apologies to The Kinks.

    • dannybhoy

      At least Terry & June made us laugh; in a gentle, middle class kinda way..

  • Sarky

    Hopefully Tresemme will ‘wash and go’!

    • IrishNeanderthal

      But who would you like to see in her place?

      • TropicalAnglican

        On another blog, the hot favourite is … Trump!

        I realise this should be more sad than amusing (I guess I wouldn’t like it myself if some of my own fellow citizens were openly rooting for another country’s leader to lead my own country, and especially if that country’s leader had blasted his own predecessor whilst at the same time publicly praising a traditional enemy), but surely the world has been turned pretty much upside-down if a US president can actually outperform the British PM on 2 important British issues:

        1. Brexit: Trump was way more rah-rah about it than May. I can see him hauling Britain out of the EU, or alternatively, kicking the EU out of Britain, whichever way you want to look at it
        2. The BBC (aka Blatantly Biased Corporation / Beyond Belief Claptrap / Biased Bullying Censors): Look at how Trump handled / treated the BBC. On a par with CNN News of “Fake News –> Very Fake News” fame. Has May ever said or done anything about the BBC? The TV tax even went up under her watch. Trump would have thumped / trumpled / torpedoed it into oblivion. (I understand he has already defunded the American equivalent, PBS or something).

  • Skidger

    At least the ‘weak and wobbly’ bishops in the CofE will be rejoicing that their man nearly got there.

  • Sarky

    Saw a crop circle on the way home tonight, just wandered if it was Mrs May going nuts??

  • Royinsouthwest

    No news from the Inspector General? He did say that he would drink floor polish if Corbyn did well. I hope he has not over-indulged!

    • Ray Spring

      That Bounder & Cad Corbyn bribed his way to success,knowing he would never have to deliver. What a low-down, dirty, political trick! A Politician tried to bribe his way to votes, and succeeded. Disgraceful. No wonder people have stopped voting. Bribery……….. By a Politician.

  • Chefofsinners

    On tonight’s edition of Disasterchef, I shall be hosting a Theresa May, who will be cooking her favourite dish of egg-on-face.
    Later I will be joined by:
    Jeremy Corbyn, who will be cooking everyone a free lunch,
    Nick Clegg, who will prepare goose, cooked a l’orange and
    Paul Nutall, who will demonstrate the perfect stuffed aubergine.

    • Manfarang

      Sky pie for lunch?

    • Anton

      Caviar ( from the sturgeon) and Salmond from Scotland?

  • Inspector General

    Chin up you lot! And you, Cranmer. This was foreseen, you know. The Remoaners last throw of the dice. You didn’t think they’d go quietly, did you!

    Anyway, they’re off home now alright. Heads bowed, kicking an empty tin can along as they go. Further resistance is useless. They know that. We do too.

    Here comes Brexit, as it must…damn well done, all involved.

    God Save the Queen!

  • Manfarang

    The Scottish Episcopal Church has voted to back same-sex marriage, making it the first Anglican church in the UK to do so.

    • Anton

      Read it first at Cranmer… I did, 24 hours ago.

      • Manfarang

        Well with all this excitement about the election I am glad you didn’t miss this item. Lets await AC article on this.

  • Chefofsinners

    Would someone please call the nation to prayer?….Justin?…No?…oh.

    Ah! Hark! It’s the local mosque, for the fifth time today.

    • Anton

      Even if ten times daily it won’t reach its destination without Christ.

    • len

      Call the Christian Nation to prayer Chef?.

      Can three people turn this Country around?.

      I suppose it is possible.Daniel was a prisoner in Babylon when he started praying .Just Daniel in Babylon, theres hope yet.

      ‘Now when Daniel learned that the decree had been published, he went home
      to his upstairs room where the windows opened toward Jerusalem. Three
      times a day he got down on his knees and prayed, giving thanks to his
      God, just as he had done before’. (Daniel 6:10)

    • David Keen

      where have you been for the last month? he called us to 10 days of prayer, it was called ‘Thy Kingdom Come’.

  • Dolphinfish

    So, prediction time. 650 seats in the Commons. Take out the speaker and Sinn Fein, that’s effectively 642. Number required for majority, 322 (And that’s in the tightest imaginable vote, when the speaker votes with the status quo. For most purposes, you don’t need anything like that.) 316 Tories plus 10 Billy Boys and girls from the DUP makes 326. That’s workable, especially with disjointed opposition, and Labour’s tribal politics will stop them working with the SNP regardless of consequence to themselves or anyone else. I think May might be in a stronger position than she’s being given credit for. But what happens next?

    The DUP don’t care about anything except sticking it to Catholics, so they’ll push for a hard Brexit, but demand that the subsidies they’ll lose from Brussels be made up by you lot. Since they’ll be pushing at an open door with the Tories, they’ll get them. I think I finally see where that £250,000m a week is going to end up.

    • bluedog

      John Redwood’s blog gives a threshold figure of 320 to achieve a majority. He includes the deputy speaker and has different sums for the Shinners.

  • DKW

    So now we have a country split in two. Those who wish to keep their benefits and the other half who do not want to pay for them

    • len

      Aptly put.
      Can a Country divided stand.And for how long?.

  • Inspector General

    Couple of choice quotes from phone-in radio this morning…

    “We need a system where everybody’s vote counts”

    &

    “What about people who voted to Remain. What about them!”

  • prompteetsincere

    The Sexit Poll: Mrs. May’s laissez faire announcement concerning the CoE’s current (because still not confirmed) teaching on same sex marriage would drive the pro-EU youth vote, especially (ahem) in Canterbury! The MSM smear already is under way for the DUP .

  • IrishNeanderthal

    E Trinca, trinca, trinca,
    buttalo giù con una spinta
    poi vedrai che bella festa
    la medicina del mondo in rovina
    stai tranquillo è questa qua.

    Hey Drinka, Drinka, Drinka,
    throw it down with a push
    Then you’ll see that good party
    Is the medicine for a world in ruin
    do not worry that’s just the way it is.

    LA SBORNIA “E Trinca Trinca Trinca” [VIDEOCLIP UFFICIALE] Tequila e Montepulciano Band – YouTube

  • andrew

    Can somebody pls explain why Jacob Rees Mogg cannot or is not climbing further up the ladder to prime, potential candidate position? He’s the only tory I really value.

    • Linus

      If you need to ask why, you wouldn’t understand the answer.