Andrea Leadsom Times
Conservative Party

The destruction of Andrea Leadsom: is it no longer permissible to be proud of motherhood?

 

“I absolutely am a Christian and I am very proud of it,” Conservative leadership candidate Andrea Leadsom told Channel 4 News. “And it absolutely acts in the background in my desire to have a very honest campaign with high integrity and so on,” she added, and then hastily clarified: “But if you are asking me, am I going to be sort of saying ‘Oh, God’s told me to do this and do that’, well of course that’s not the case.” No, indeed: can’t be seen to be mindful of the divine. “Mention God and you’re a nutter,” mused Tony Blair. The God who was made known through Jesus Christ has become unknowable – at least in public life.

You see her honest and candid style: Andrea Leadsom answers a personal question directly (she ‘does God’), but isn’t so steeped in the dark arts of discursive articulacy as to be able to deflect and obfuscate. Or perhaps she is, but helpfully chooses not to where her faith and moral values are concerned. She is a Christian – a proud Christian – and has absolutely nothing to hide under a bushel. The other Tory leadership hopeful Theresa May is also a Christian – the daughter of a vicar, no less – but she doesn’t talk about it at all. It’s a private matter: Theresa May’s Christian faith may or may not inform her politics: we just don’t know. Bushels abound.

“Do you ever feel that you’ve been spoken to directly by God?” probed C4’s Gary Gibbon, luring Mrs Leadsom into his parlour. If you’re not used to such a line of questioning, you might stumble, especially when you know that what you say is likely to be a distorted headline the next day. “That question is not one that is for open laughing at and poking fun at,” she responded. “I can absolutely feel that that’s what you would like to.”

Indeed it was and indeed it is. Such is our secularised media: it’s okay to believe in God, as long as you don’t believe too strongly. The invective duly poured forth, like pus out of an abscess: Leadsom the religious nutter, zealot, bigot, homophobe, etc., etc. “She’s just not ready to be PM”; “Not PM material”; “Leadsom doesn’t have the experience the country needs..”, determined the High Court of Twitter – especially those who happened to support Remain in the EU Referendum, for whom Andrea Leadsom could never be fit to kiss their children, let alone lead the country.

Ah, children.

are an heritage of the Lord: and the fruit of the womb is his reward.
As arrows are in the hand of a mighty man; so are children of the youth.
Happy is the man that hath his quiver full of them: they shall not be ashamed, but they shall speak with the enemies in the gate (Ps 127:3ff)

Andrea Leadsom gave another honest and candid interview to the Times, and spoke about motherhood and apple pie. But the Times headline omits the apple pie bit, which is a pity because most of the country will only read the headline and draw their split-second conclusions. ‘Being a mother gives me edge on May — Leadsom‘. It’s callous, heartless, wicked stuff: gospel truth in a tabloid soundbite. But of those who read the whole article, how many will bother to source the original transcript? How many will read the agonisingly compassionate words “So, really carefully..”? Will the Times release the recording so we may hear her tenderness and sense her humanity? Who will bother to listen to that?

Andrea Leadsom patently said: “I am sure Theresa May will be really sad she doesn’t have children so I don’t want this to be ‘Andrea has children, Theresa hasn’t’, because I think that would be really horrible.” But that’s precisely the line the Times chooses to splash across its front-page. Daggers out. Horrible it is, and Mrs Leadsom is justifiably angry. Apparently, we don’t only live in a country where it’s increasingly impossibly to ‘do God’ in public life: it is one in which it is no longer permissible to be proud of motherhood without being accused of denigrating singleness or taunting infertility.

Isn’t it simply a statement of social fact that having children keeps you focused on things which those without children do not need to? If you are about to give birth, are you not a little more invested in the quality of midwifery? If your children are at school, are you not a little more concerned about teaching standards and school performance? If your mother has Alzheimer’s, or your uncle prostate cancer, do you not understand and feel a little more, a little differently, a little deeper?

Andrea Leadsom may be naive in dealing with the media, and she may occasionally express herself clumsily – that is, with words or phrases which may be easily excised from their context and distorted. But David Cameron gave ‘car-crash’ interviews in his early months. So did Justin Welby. And so, please God, might they and all people in public life continue to do so. They are human and fallible, and if they may not err they must never again speak to the media, and so the light of their values and beliefs will remain secret, buried beneath a mountain of bushels.

Andrea Leadsom has a desire to be honest and open about her faith, her family, her sense of patriotism and her Christian moral values. She is deeply, passionately concerned with that place where the rule of law meets the life of faith. In her humility she makes a vow to her country. It may not be entire, whole and perfect, but it is the service of her love. The least the media could do is to treat her motives, faith and meanings fairly. Just like they did Sadiq Khan.

  • Albert

    It’s pretty obvious what is going on here. On 23rd June, the electorate, for once, managed to “take back control” from the political elite. Now there is a campaign of damage limitation, by the elite, to get their own person in, by damaging Mrs Leadsom.

    • David

      Yes that is as plain as the nose on the front of your face.

      • Albert

        It may backfire of course. It did in the referendum.

        • David

          Yes hopefully Albert, hopefully.
          But now that the public have seen the level of spin and lies used to try to frighten them into submission, they are going to be harder to fool again. This is especially so if all those on the side of justice and common sense, help them to spot the propaganda.
          I do believe that the strength to withstand the media onslaught that we endured, to try to bully us into Remaining, has been derived to a very large extent by the experience that many of us had; when we were young many of us were sold a pup by Heath and his lying cronies, only to spend a large chunk of our lives watch it slowly turn sour.
          It is our long memories and negative experiences that have helped to lead the UK out to something far better for all our futures.

          • Albert

            Certainly, and this long negative experience perhaps explains why young people voted to Remain more than older people.

          • David

            Yes exactly.

          • Old Nick

            Which is also why all the current fuss about the £350m for the NHS is nonsense. The electorate (what Disraeli called the Angels in Marble) is less swayed by slogans than the rude folk who talk so much on the BBC. One of C.S. Lewis’s characters in That Hideous Strength says that the general population makes its mind up slowly but surely (think “the Metric Martyrs” and how long ago that was) whereas a skilfully-placed article in the Observer or the New Statesman (sorry, Statesperson) will shift the thoughts of the intelligentsia in a week.

          • PessimisticPurple

            The public have shown they’re not as stupid as the political elite assume them to be. Unfortunate for Andrea Leadsom, that means SHE can’t work them like puppets anymore than anyone else can.

          • Old Nick

            I like the idea of a pup turning sour almost as much as the nose on the front of my face backfiring !

          • David

            Colloquialisms have their uses !

    • CliveM

      May has been backed by the Daily Mail, who was one of the the biggest supporters in the media for Brexit. Maybe some people see Leadsom as lacking the necessary experience.

      • Albert

        It’s interesting how the Mail has reported this motherhood story:

        ‘Being a mother makes me a better PM’: Fury as Tory hopeful Andrea Leadsom says having children gives her the edge over Theresa…Andrea Leadsom claimed being a mother would make her a better leader

        Yet, one searches in vain in the text of the report for where Leadsom actually says that.

        Interestingly, as far as I can see, you have to go back to Ted Heath to find a PM without children and I suspect that many parents do think having children gives Leadsom an edge as a leader.

        • CliveM

          I am not a big fan of the DM, I find its insistence of finding a negative to every story destructive.

          Personally (as a parent) I don’t see parenthood as a good predictor as to an individual’s ability to be PM.

  • disqus_N9Jawtu8Uw

    Well done for managing to quote from “I vow to thee my country” at the end!

    Sadly we are a country in which the media pretend to everyone to be intelligent when that is how they think of themselves in their own small way, but they are actually very small minded and quite ignorant.

  • Steve

    From the audio clip that I heard it seems that the reporter introduced the issue of motherhood. Presumably this was a trap set deliberately yet the press constantly whine about politicians being slippery.

    • Broadwood

      Yes. It was a ‘gotcha’ question.

      • PessimisticPurple

        If it was, then it worked. Not the sharpest chisel in he box, is she?

        • Broadwood

          So when did you stop beating your wife?

          • PessimisticPurple

            It was Leadsom — not the reporter — who brought up the issue of children. As I say, a Willie Horton effort.

          • Broadwood

            No, she was clearly lead into talking about motherhood specifically. But child development and working mothers are political campaigning interest of hers anyway, according to her website. Was she supposed not to mention it, just because TM has no children? Did she say motherhood made her a better person? Of course not, she did her best to scotch that angle, but was still hung out to dry over it.
            Classic gotcha.

  • David

    She sounds like a good, principled and sincere woman who clearly intends to uphold our finest traditions of tolerance, freedom and fair play. So it is no wonder that the ignorant, arrogant MS media hate her.

  • PessimisticPurple

    I’m sorry, but she was completely offside. She was doing a Willie Horton and it’s blown back in her face. She was quite deliberately attempting to insinuate that there is something wrong with her opponent because she doesn’t have children, and that should tell you everything you need to know about her personal and moral integrity.

    • Albert

      No: she’s simply saying that while May has ministerial experience, she has important experience May doesn’t have.

      • PessimisticPurple

        Well, Albert, I think we’ll have to disagree about her motivations. Perhaps each of us is ascribing what we wish to see? If that is the case, then Leadsom may have solidified her existing support, but she didn’t win any new friends and those people she influenced, she has influenced negatively. As I’ve said below, not the sharpest chisel in the box.

  • Pubcrawler

    Your Grace’s last sentence is the kicker.

  • Eustace

    I think Leadsom stands a good chance of winning this contest. She’s the Conservative Party’s Corbyn. The joke candidate that a disgruntled electorate propels into the top job out of pure spite and a desire to punish its political leaders.

    I can’t wait for her to become PM. A Conservative civil war dwarfing the crisis Labour currently finds itself in will engulf the country and leave it leaderless and rudderless at a time when leadership and a clear direction are most needed.

    Leadsom has neither the power base nor the charisma to lead and unite either the country or the Conservative Party. So the uncertainty currently clouding the markets and undermining Sterling can only worsen.

    What an opportunity for EU countries to profit from British weakness as companies, banks and markets relocate to the Continent in order to preserve their access to the Single Market.

    So go Leadsom! May the bigots who voted the UK out of Europe continue in their bigotry and vote her into Number 10. The chaos that will ensue will be highly entertaining when viewed from the Continent. Bien fait pour vos gueules.

    • The Explorer

      I hope you’re moving all your financial assets to France. Hollande has need of them.

    • Inspector General

      Thought you’d be back, after a period of mourning. “Sent to us by the Divil himself”, as one’s Irish Grandfather would have put it.

      So, you silly homosexual boy, you’re looking forward to Mrs Leadsom for Premier, as we all are. But you are at odds with militant gays on Pink News comments. Allow the Inspector to provide you with a link.

      http://www.pinknews.co.uk/2016/07/08/david-cameron-defends-equal-marriage-against-criticism-from-andrea-leadsom/

      By the way, the thugs therein are turning on their fellows who were for Brexit. Really lifts the spirits seeing them fighting on the ground. Of course, events have been happening thick and fast of late, and the 49 martyrs of Orlando are all but forgotten now…

      • Eustace

        Yes, I’m looking forward to the farce that a Leadsom premiership will be.

        A weak and inexperienced leader elected by a popular protest vote has already reduced the Labour Party to a laughing stock. If the same happens to the Conservatives, we can look forward to a complete lack of confidence in the ability of Britain to govern itself or to reassure the markets about its future.

        Seeing those who are so desperate to sink the European ship be the first to founder and drown will be extremely satisfying. The British deserve the chaos that will descend on them if they hand the reins of power to a dishonest, blagging, self-promoting rank amateur.

        The Brexit vote has seen a surge in support for the EU across Europe. As chaos descends into farce in Britain, this can only intensify.

        • The Explorer

          “The Brexit vote has seen a surge in support for the EU across Europe.”

          It has also seen a surge in support for following the Brexit example. I’m no fan of ‘Time’ magazine, but when it mentioned the domino effect it might have been on to something.

          • Eustace

            Not a single European country has called a referendum on Europe.

            We’re all watching to see what happens in the UK. And so far, we don’t like what we see.

            The political and economic anarchy you’re experiencing is not a good advertisement for referendums. This is why support for the idea has plummeted across the EU.

            The best way of dissuading the rest of us from jumping into uncharted waters is the spectacle of you drowning in them. As the only purpose you serve now is as a warning to others, it would be best for all of us if you sank from view quickly. So vote Leadsom! She’ll drag you down far more quickly and efficiently than May. Why prolong the agony?

          • The Explorer

            France, Poland, the Czech Republic, Denmark, Austria, Hungary and the Netherlands are considering their options. Hungary, for one, isn’t looking at the UK: it’s looking at immigration quotas and its refusal to accept them.
            From the ‘we’re’ and ‘you’re’ references, may we assume that you are no longer resident in the UK? If Brexit brought that about, then we may rejoice in at least one positive Brexit outcome already.

        • Inspector General

          Conservatism emanates from the provinces. That’s its strength. In fact, pure Conservatism is unbeatable. What we are soon to witness is the cleansing of ALL metropolitan corruption it has suffered in the years under Cameron.

          Be envious, you miserable bugger, for the Inspector is in a state of smugness resulting. A most satisfactory, well, feeling of satisfaction…

          • Eustace

            Yes, I think you’re right. Conservatism does emanate from the mud. And Socialism from the gutter.

            The latter was always an expression of demotic fury. The former has become so.

            If an era of McCarthyist purges has descended on the soon to be defunct UK then let’s hope for your sake that don’t live too much longer. After the action comes the reaction. The puritan 50s led directly to the swinging 60s. Try as you might to stop it, the wheel will keep on turning, so once you’ve wreaked revenge on all those you hate, they’ll regroup and wreak revenge on you.

        • William Lewis

          ” The British deserve the chaos that will descend on them ”

          Don’t you mean “us”? Or are you no longer British?

          • CliveM

            We can hope.

          • The Explorer

            Is he reverting to being French? Poor chap. He may have fled France and adopted the British side of himself to avoid Hollande’s tax regime. Now he finds himself (in his view) with a financial situation even worse than that in France.
            Between the Devil (if he believed in the Devil) and the Deep Blue Sea.

          • Eustace

            I still have the passport, if that’s what you mean. And half my genes hail from your nasty little country.

            I can rip up the passport and bin it. I can’t excise the Britishness from my DNA however.

            Pity.

            But let’s not be pessimistic. They’re making great strides in gene therapy, so perhaps one day it will be possible to recode an individual’s genome to eliminate unwanted traits. Like susceptibility to cancer. Or haemophilia. Or Britishness.

            I live in hope.

        • St Martyr

          U Marxist junkie. what a bore. Go live in the middle east f you hate is so much here!

    • Merchantman

      You underestimate the 17m who voted Leave. A new alliance is building. The time for the blind leading this country are over. The Plebs can see it.

      • Eustace

        In the country of the blind, the one-eyed man (or in this case woman) is king.

        Britain having just blinded itself, it’s now prey to whatever sad little demagogue manages to get a board up on top of the wave of hatred and fear that’s rising to engulf the nation.

        How long will she be able to ride the wave? If her embroidered CV is any indication, not long. Blaggers like Andrea Leadsom can only rise so far before their complete lack of talent for anything except self-promotion becomes apparent and leads to their downfall.

        Even as a junior minister Mrs Leadsom’s performance was spectacularly incompetent. As prime minister she’ll last 5 minutes.

        But that probably won’t stop her from being elected. And when she falls, the political and economic chaos will be unparalleled. Investors don’t put their money into a country that can’t govern itself. You have no government, no opposition and no prospect of a return to stable government any time soon.

        You’re basically toast. The burned variety. If May wins she might be able to rescue you from the toaster, scrape a bit of the charcoal off and what’s left might be just about palatable. But if it’s Leadsom, your grilling continues. I hope it will be Leadsome, because now you’re no longer European partners, you’ve become rivals and competitors, so anything that undermines you is a good thing.

        • Anton

          On the basis of the admittedly restricted information available about her, she is a better option than Theresa May – she is a Brexiteer and not obsessed with the equalities nonsense. If she proves not up to it then she too can be replaced. Turbulence in government is not the end of the world. At the moment we have no effective government, and you know what? The sun still rises in the morning, the electricity and water still works, businesses still cut deals with each other, the law is still enforced, continental Europe is still a wonderful place with a ghastly unaccountable political system, and the French still know more about turbulence in government than the British.

          Both the pound and the Euro are badly managed and riding for a fall. Everything that goes wrong from now on is going to get blamed on Brexit, but such arguments will be exposed as the propaganda they are.

          Oh, and with unemployment among the young above 40% in Spain, Italy and Greece thanks to EU monetary policy, and waves of immigrants who hate European civilisation landing on the beaches of those nations because Germany has said they are welcome, watch for the resurgence of political extremism of left or right. Moreover the democratic tradition is a lot weaker in those lands than in Britain. The Med is where there really is a risk of sad little demagogue taking control. All thanks to the EU.

          • Eustace

            Spoken like a true zealot. Unsurprising from one who worships a grim little tribal totem. Leadsom is clearly the Second Coming who will lead you to the promised land. And if she turns out to be a false prophet, there are plenty more where she came from. One of them will be the true messiah…

            Poor demented fool. Nobody cares if you ruin your own life with your misplaced religious fervour. But your determination to drag others down with you makes you dangerous.

            When this is all over and the English are faced with trying to salvage something from the ruins of their nation, they’ll know who to blame.

          • Anton

            Is that the best you can do for a reply?

          • Eustace

            What other reply does a swivel-eyed loon and religious nutter need?

            The reply you want – indeed the only reply you’ll ever accept as valid – is “I am wrong, you are right” followed by me falling to my knees and worshipping you as the image of godly perfection, at which point you’ll admit to one or two minor sins in a display or false modesty that’s clearly insincere. I mean, if you really believed you were imperfect, how could you place so much confidence in beliefs that admit of no physical proof and rest entirely on you and your understanding of how you want things to be?

            As I will never kowtow to you and your entirely made-up philosophy, I must be dismissed as evil and corrupt.

            That’s the reality of dealing with Christians, Muslims and all others whose reason has fallen victim to the psychological disorder known as religion. It creeps into every part of a believer’s life, so that even political beliefs are held with religious fervour and intransigeance. Even when Britain breaks apart and the English economy stagnates so that your fellow countrymen are plunged into political chaos and poverty, you’ll still believe Brexit is a good thing because that’s what you’ve decided it should be and facts can’t be allowed to interfere with your idea of what should be true.

            When it all goes belly up, those whose lives and livelihoods have been damaged by zealots like you will know exactly who to blame. Which of course you’re probably looking forward to. Nothing gives a Christian a hard on like the prospect of being made a martyr for his faith.

          • Anton

            Anybody would think you disagreed with me, you know…

    • Another anal ululation.

  • CliveM

    Knowing what to say, how to say it and when, is a prime political requirements of party leaders and PM’s. It’s not a trivial requirement either. If you don’t get it right, you undermine yourself, your party, your program and country.

    She needs to get this right quickly or (if she wins) will spend her whole premiership trying to recover from self inflicted gaffs.

    • The Explorer

      So much for evil-eye strategy.

      • CliveM

        I hope you’ve learnt you lesson (this time)!

        • The Explorer

          I’m beginning to think that simply mentioning him sets up some sort of tremor on the Web that he responds to.

  • len

    Christians(especially perhaps those in public life) should remember the words of Jesus “Behold, I send you out as sheep in the midst of wolves; so be shrewd as serpents and innocent as doves.”

    It is a mistake to assume that many journalists have any integrity at all and like Michael Gove will get close so that they stab you in the back….

    • steroflex

      If I had been her, I should have asked if the interviewer had a private life and if he was gay.

  • Uncle Brian

    Mrs Proudie for Prime Minister!

    • Mrs Proudie of Barchester

      Goodness!

    • chiefofsinners

      She has been among us so long, and still you do not know her? Let me spell it out. Mrs Proudie IS Andrea Wholesome.

  • chiefofsinners

    It is an easy thing to do if you have no integrity. Anything anyone says can be edited down and removed from its context to create a headline.
    Take my first sentence for example : “you have no integrity” says CoS.
    No doubt someone is hacking Andrea Leadsome’s voicemail and training a telephoto lens on her bedroom window even as we speak.

  • donadrian

    There is something undeniably unattractive about Mrs Leadsom’s use of apophasis. What purpose was there in mentioning Mrs May’s childlessness if not to imply the contrast that she says she does not want people to make?

    • St Martyr

      She was asked to?

    • St Martyr

      And I’m a childless woman!

    • Anna055

      Do we have the unedited transcript of the whole interview yet?…. If I was a betting woman, I’d bet on the reporter having brought the subject up first.

  • Inspector General

    I say, what a woman!

    Here is a tough old bird comprised of strong meat. She won’t be brought down on anything, it looks like.

    Even the Inspector knows that in the wine sipping gentility of the power businesswoman, it is poor etiquette to mention a rivals fecundity outside of the powder room. It just isn’t done. Far from stumbling into an interviewers crafty device to bring forth such juicy titbits she has volunteered with talons drawn.

    Question is, just how will May take her revenge. We know she’s going to take revenge, for lo, she is woman, naked, uncovered at this moment.

    • Mrs Leadsom would do well to get together with Boris who has said he supports her and knows a thing or two about what to say to the media.
      I think she is refreshing and a well rounded person.

      • Inspector General

        There’s a thing, Marie. What position will Boris hold under, hopefully, Leadsom’s cabinet. One hopes Gove the Hatchet gets the EU brief. Nothing like having a cunning bastard like him up there to face off the continental Eurobuggers lined up to punish us in negotiations to come. (Yes, the Inspector is on record for calling Gove an honourable man…but isn’t he something special, what!)

        • Old Nick

          Brutus was an honourable man….

        • Something in communications and front of house, he’d compliment Mrs Leadsom.
          As for Mr Gove, his weakness is in his impatience along with a fascination with intrigue and Machiavellian type characters. He’s a reformer and works well serving others where he can be kept on the straight and narrow.

          • Dreadnaught

            He did us a favour by eliminating Boris. The way he did it was almost classic Stalinist. As for a role for Bozza how about Minister for Mirth.
            Leadsom will or should be a PM in waiting once she has gained political guile from experience and mentoring – maybe a role here for Mike the Knife.

  • Being a parent most certainly gives one an advantage as PM. The more children, the stronger the advantage. Why? Mainly because of the insights gleaned in managing unruly children. Priceless when it comes to running Cabinet.

    • Albert

      Quite. I think that what has happened here is that Leadsom knows she lacks ministerial experience, and she is not wanting the fact that she has more important experience to go unnoticed.

      We might say, however, that she currently lacks experience of giving interviews.

    • PessimisticPurple

      Ah, but you’re forgetting, Jack. Children are like anal ululations — you think your own are sweet, but everyone else’s stink the place out.

      • Anal ululations – to utter howling sounds, as in shrill, wordless lamentation; to wail from one’s anus.

        Linus territory, not Jack’s.

  • preacher

    ” The mills of God grind slow, but they grind extremely fine. ” I hope Andrea Leadsom wins & becomes P.M . But nothing can deflect the plans & will of God.
    We’ve waited more than forty years to leave the E.U, but The Lord’s timing is perfect & He doesn’t march to the beat of anyone else’s drum. The Israelites had given up hope of freedom until a babe called Moses was born & grew to lead them out of Egypt to establish a new Kingdom.
    Generations come & go, bad people rise to power & prosper – for a time, then they are gone & soon forgotten. The good leave an inheritance that the wise learn & pass on to future generations when they leave. But the will & plans of God thwart His enemies & they are powerless to change them. ” Thy will be done on earth as it is in Heaven ” – & it will ! however long or short the time may be. So sleep peacefully brethren we are in Safe hands.

  • Anna055

    I listened to the part of the interview that the Times released. It sounded odd to me …things didn’t quite follow properly, and one of the interviewer’s questions was completely unintelligible ….I can’t help wondering if it was cut and pasted to sound bad.

  • Dominic Stockford

    It is fascinating to note that here, in an area that returned a Tory MP, and where the local Tory bigwigs are Leavers, the Times has singularly failed to sell many copies today at all. The vast heaps still on newsagents shelves are very noticeable.

  • Takes me right back to the way the media destroyed David Davis so that ‘heir to Blair’ liberal Cameron got made leader. Peter Hitchens wrote about this in his insightful book ‘The Cameron Delusion’. It now appears that only convinced homoenablers are allowed to be PM. How long before this attitudinal requirement becomes mandatory for all public servants down to the level of classroom assistant?

  • len

    The’ elites’ of Europe have done all they can to destroy the family unit, to destroy National identity, Christian foundations, and Sovereignty. All this in an attempt to render the people passive and able to be led in the direction these’ elites’ wished to lead us.
    So to have a brexiteer Mother AND a Christian is the ultimate slap in the face to these EU elites !.

  • steroflex

    If you don’t like the heat, get out of the kitchen.
    Ask Boris Johnson, Michael Gove, Nigel Farage about being maltreated by the press.

  • carl jacobs

    Is it no longer permissible to be proud of motherhood?

    Of course not. Europe doesn’t “do children” anymore.

    • Inspector General

      They’re building ever smaller ‘homes’ in the UK. Have been for decades. No room for many children, you see.

      Yet we’re supposed to welcome in all comers from abroad. We always have room for them…what a bloody laugh ‘free movement’ of people is, was.

    • The German’s stopped after the last war. No wonder they are importing from abroad now. Of course war creates an imbalance in the population when all the decent men get killed off. Germany has a large population of single women.

    • PessimisticPurple

      Could I remind you that Theresa May and her husband were — for whatever reason –UNABLE to have children, not unwilling? Is it your position that this in some way makes her sub-standard?

      • Inspector General

        Carl can be a real rotter at times…

        • carl jacobs

          Et tu, Iggy?

          • Inspector General

            You don’t know shame, do you…

          • carl jacobs

            What’s wrong with “Iggy”? It makes a nice parallel to “Brute” don’t you think?

          • Inspector General

            Off you go, Carl. Whatever makes you happy.

            The Inspector is still laughing at the way Pee Pee had a go at you. The best things in life really are free…

          • carl jacobs

            I understand. Someone is still sore after being body-slammed by Jack the other day. I see. It’s embarrassing, but these things happen.

            Well, not to me, of course.

          • Still intending to vote for Clinton, Carl? Shotgun ready, one trusts.

          • carl jacobs

            See, that’s not a body slam. That’s more like an annoying unmentionable itch.

            I have no idea what I will do in November. Anyways. The Idiot isn’t the nominee yet.

          • It’ll be a choice between Trump and Clinton, Carl. Hard to accept but an odds on certainty.

          • carl jacobs

            I can always hope he will be caught in a hotel room with a cucumber, a chicken, and a blow-up doll.

          • Iggy, Iggy, Iggy …………..

          • carl jacobs

            Do you think he has a cat named Scratchy?

          • Oi, oi, oi …..

            It’s Itchy & Scratchy.

          • carl jacobs

            It is?

            [checks Google…]

            Huh. Oh Well. I never watched the Simpsons anyways.

      • carl jacobs

        My statement had nothing to do with Theresa May. It had to do with the allergy Europeans possess towards children. The Fertility rate in Germany (for example) has been below 1.5 since the early 70s. Think about that. One of the richest countries in the world has been unable to sustain its population for 40 years.

        The pattern is repeated all across rich, comfortable, orgasmically satisfied Europe. Why is that?

        • PessimisticPurple

          In one word, Protestantism. Germany is the home of this poison, so it’s fitting that it should be the country which dies of it first, but Britain and America are not that far behind them. Catholicism could yet save the west, if Her bishops were not in open rebellion against Rome and Her body effectively colonized by Protestant theology since Vatican II. The answer is very simple — have children and go to Church, both victims of “tolerance” and a false compassion.

          • Inspector General

            You have something there. Another society changing unpleasantry from the continent. We could have done with a referendum on that too at the time. One thinks the two alternatives would be ‘Accept’, ‘Reject’. Who would win!

          • CliveM

            Tell me how is Catholicism doing in those ‘staunchly’ Catholic countries Italy and France?

          • Did you miss the point about rebellious bishops and Vatican II?

          • CliveM

            No, I’m also curious to know if that’s Protestantisms fault as well.

          • Of course it is. It all goes back to contraception and the protestant churches accepting this from the 1930’s onwards. Catholic modernists have been in rebellion ever since.

          • CliveM

            Interesting. Of course some would argue that people are responsible for their own actions and that blaming others is simply an attempt not to accept said responsibility.

          • carl jacobs

            And Jack would normally make that argument as well. Except when it reflects badly on the RCC.

          • PessimisticPurple

            Your original question was why Europe in general and Germany in particular has stopped reproducing. The answer is Protestantism.

          • carl jacobs

            The actual answer is secularism and its self-obsessed self-regarding world view. Children make demands. They impose obligations. The autonomous adult inhabitant in this secular culture would rather spend his time and money on himself.

            But if you wish to blame Protestants for the corruptions in the RCC, knock yourself out. It wasn’t Protestants who elected Pope Francis Jefferts Shori.

          • PessimisticPurple

            What do you imagine secularism grew out of?

          • carl jacobs

            Many things. The trauma of the world wars and the resulting destruction of traditional authority. The deification of science, and its concomitant evolutionary mindset. The seduction of wealth. But at root it the inherent unbelieving nature of man that looks for any reason to justify its unbelief.

            Of course, if I wanted to be polemical, I would just say the dead sacramentalism of Rome. But that wouldn’t be true.

          • It actually grew out of a rejection of the Divine and a rejection of the authority of the Church. And what started that?

          • Anton

            In regard to the latter, Catholics should not airbrush the schism of 1054 with Orthodoxy.

            Secularism is an abuse of the freedom of conscience that was won at the Reformation. God prefers man to have freedom of conscience, despite the associated cost of wrong choices, than to force man to a particular belief system. The latter is the Islamic way. And yours?

          • Freedom of conscience is fine. It’s the proper formation of one’s conscience and then adhering to the “soft, still voice within” that is at issue. God surely wants man to be able to discern the difference between right and wrong.

          • Anton

            I should have added to my statement, that secularism is an abuse of the freedom won at the Reformation, that that abuse was cradled principally in an institutionally Catholic country: France, in the century after it threw out all its protestants.

          • carl jacobs

            It actually grew out of a rejection of the Divine …

            What part of …

            But at root it is the inherent unbelieving nature of man that looks for any reason to justify its unbelief

            … is this supposed to correct?

            … and a rejection of the authority of the Church

            Well, it is nice that you at least distinguish between Divine authority and the authority of the Church. Of course, we haven’t rejected the authority of the Church, because 1) Rome isn’t coterminous with the Church and 2) Rome never had any legitimate authority to begin with.

          • Typical protestant answer.

          • carl jacobs

            And yet it’s true.

          • Based on your personal understanding of scripture (which, in turn, is based on one man’s interpretation).

          • CliveM

            I didn’t realise the RCC was such a delicate flower.

          • carl jacobs

            Well, you know. Things haven’t been the same since it was forced to give up its empire.

          • CliveM

            I wonder who it blamed for its errors before Protestantism. I suspect it won’t be itself.

          • carl jacobs

            Well, “Protestant” doesn’t actually mean “Protestant” the way it’s being used by the Catholics in this discussion. “Protestant” has be changed to mean “any idea that rejects the idealized teaching of the RCC – which teaching is of course immutable.” Just don’t look too hard at how that teaching has changed over the centuries. That would demonstrate a very Protestant attitude.

          • The fundamentals of no teaching has changed over the centuries, Carl.

            This is exactly the refrain of protestants who challenge the Church’s moral teachings on women’s ordination, marriage and divorce, contraception, abortion and homosexuality. They reject the existence of hell, the concept of sin and judgement, and the need for repentance. We’re all heaven bound. The sacraments are mere symbols and not effective channels of grace.

            “Church doctrine has changed in the past,” they protest, “it can and must change again.” We need to dismantle the hierarchical, patriarchical church and start again with a democratic structure giving power to the laity. They reject infallibility and indefectability precisely because it means there can be no accommodation to the age.

            These ideas and those who profess them are protestant to their core.

          • CliveM

            I think all the Churches should be less concerned about blaming their failings on others and more concerned with accepting responsibility for our own sins.

            We might all be a bit more effective in our witness if we did.

          • PessimisticPurple

            I think there has been a misunderstanding here. Catholicism is the ideal as set out by Christ during His time on Earth. Simply put, He founded the Catholic Church to continue His work. What it teaches is what He teaches, but membership of the Church does not bestow salvation. You have to live it and believe it, and Catholics are as prone to sin as any other. The Church is only preserved from error in its Magisterium, not it’s membership. If its members — including its bishops — start going off the reservation and making it up, they are Protestants.

            “I am the way, the truth and the light. No one can come to the father except through me”. Or, to paraphrase, it’s My way or the highway. Anything on the highway is Protestantism, and that includes rebellious Catholics.

          • Martin

            PessimisticPurplePride

            ROFL, so why did it take hundreds of years before the Roman Catholic Church appeared?

          • carl jacobs

            Martin, Martin, Martin …

            [Shakes head condescendingly]

            Oak trees, Martin! Acorns!

          • Martin

            Carl

            And when you plant corn you don’t get oaks. 😉

          • The Church began at Pentecost. The Roman Catholic Church is just the title that distinguishes it from other Catholic Churches in communion with her and those who have separated themselves from her.

            Christ founded only one Church – his Church – on Peter, with the guarantee of indefectibility in the face of the persecutions, divisions and obstacles of every kind which she would encounter in the course of history. Only one Church exists – the one, holy, Catholic and apostolic Church.

          • Martin

            HJ

            The RCC is not part of that Church that began at Pentecost, the Church that Christ founded, whose members cover every age. Peter was a member but Christ is the rock.

          • CliveM

            No there is no misunderstanding. Anything on the highway is Protestantism? Not orthodoxy or Lollardism or anyone of the multiple ‘heresies’ that predate Protestantism!!

          • Saint Peter was the first protestant – remember? Then came Judas.

          • CliveM

            St. Peter? Was he? Do explain.

          • Matthew 16 22-23

          • CliveM

            Well it’s Peter getting things wrong again and Jesus not blaming Protestantism.

            Bit of a shocker there.

          • len

            Catholicism is the enemy of the Church of Jesus Christ.History has proved that..

          • carl jacobs

            The problem with Rome is that claim to infallibility. It creates … difficulties.

          • Infallibility is what holds the Church to its mission. It may create ‘political’ difficulties because she appears out of touch with so called modern times. However, knowing the Holy Spirit guides the Church and prevents her from committing error is wonderful.

          • CliveM

            I’d find its claim of infallibility easier to respect if it actually believed it.

          • Satan is influential in every age. He just manifests himself differently.

          • CliveM

            I think one of the lessons of Adam and Eve and their willingness to be led astray by the snake, is that God doesn’t accept blaming others, even Satan as an excuse. I get the impression he isn’t much impressed by it.

          • Without the temptation there wouldn’t have been a fall.

          • CliveM

            No one or no thing is obliged to succumbs of temptation.

          • True …. but we all do.

          • CliveM

            Christ was tempted in the wilderness by Satan three times and three times he rejected him. That is our model and people don’t always succumb to temptation. Some people reject it. But hopefully when they do succumb and confess and asks Gods mercy and forgiveness, they don’t try and blame other agency .

            He probably won’t listen.

          • People are responsible for their own actions but the effect of false leaders is real.

          • CliveM

            But it’s clear that the problem for the RCC is false teachers from within and blaming those from without is simply a refusal to accept responsibility.

          • The Church has been infected by protestant ‘scholars’ and the accompanying abandonment of orthodox morality. Everyone wants to be a mini pope nowadays.

          • CliveM

            Do they? Bit of a sweeping statement. I make no claims to infallibility, and I find that true for most people.

          • Do you rely on your own interpretation of scripture over some authoritative? Do you trust your individual conscience over Church doctrine?

          • CliveM

            My understanding of scripture is orthodox Christian. It derives from the understanding I was taught as a child and the study I engaged in as an adult. It’s built upon numerous sermons from those Ministers respect. It is not a product of my own creation.
            All pretty ordinary and typical of the way most people come to understand Gods word.

          • William Lewis

            It seems that you are the Protestant. Are you not protesting against the state of your church?

          • len

            Another recruit for the cyber home guard?

          • The Cyber Swiss Guard rule – OK.

          • len

            Hello Jack….

          • Good evening to you, Len. Would you like Jack to put an application form for the CSG in the post to you?

          • len

            No…. Its much more fun watching their antics from the sidelines Jack……

          • But think of the fun you’d have as a double agent.

          • carl jacobs

            Oh, of course. I completely forget about how Catholicism has sustained the fertility rates in Spain, and Italy. Silly me.

            I’ll leave the Google search on Spanish and Italian fertility rates as an exercise for the reader.

          • Another one who overlooked the point about the bishops rebelling and protestantism having colonised Catholicism since Vatican II.

          • carl jacobs

            I didn’t overlook it. I ignored it as not being worth refuting. There is a difference.

          • And yet it’s true.

          • carl jacobs

            Take responsibility for the sins of your own church, Jack. Don’t shove them off onto others.

          • It’s one and the same sin, Carl. Apostasy and heresy. They’ve been with the Church since the time of Judas.

          • carl jacobs

            Protestants are not responsible for all those good little Catholics choosing to do the things they did. It’s ridiculous to suggest otherwise. You are simply engaging in special pleading in order to protect the RCC.

          • Error spreads like a cancer. It’s not special pleading to recognise what’s wrong with the Catholic Church.

          • carl jacobs

            Protestants are not responsible for the errors in the RCC.

          • PessimisticPurple

            There are no errors in the RCC. There are, however, many supposed Roman Catholics following their emotions rather than the teaching of the Church. The word which most effectively describes this practice is “Protestantism”.

          • carl jacobs

            And there we have it – the clear statement of what is really going on. I expected Jack to get there first.

            You are creating an idealized RCC, and then abstracting every error it makes into the category “Protestant” in order to isolate the purity of Rome from the errors it promulgates. We can’t be asking any embarrassing questions about the teaching authority of the Magisterium, now can we.

          • PessimisticPurple

            No. Because it has nothing to do with the question you originally posed.

          • carl jacobs

            The question I originally posed had nothing to do with your original answer. I picked Germany as an example only because I had just looked up its fertility rate on Google. All you have done is substitute the word “Protestant” for “error” as if that has some meaning. Your purpose is transparently to shift guilt away from the Magisterium by suggesting all those who brought about these changes weren’t really Catholic. They were (duh duh duhhhhh) Protestant.

            Or maybe … just maybe … your Magisterium isn’t what it claims to be.

          • The issue isn’t changes brought in by the magisterium. It’s the so called “Spirit of Vatican II” which modernists profess. This has a distinctly protestant feel to it. More accurately, a liberal protestant feel as opposed to the more fundamentalist churches.

          • There’s nothing amiss about the magisterium, Carl.

            The problem is those who ignore the teachings of the Church and seek to undermine her authority. One could call these people heretics. However, in the main, they profess protestant opinions about primacy of personal conscience and the right of individuals to interpret scripture for themselves. They also subscribe to the historical-critical method of studying the bible and use this to run riot through orthodox beliefs.

          • Martin

            HJ

            The Church is not some organisation in Rome, but the individual Christians who are born again of the Holy Spirit.

          • Anton

            It’s a very standard Catholic trick.

          • Pubcrawler

            “There are no errors in the RCC.”

            filioque Good luck pinning that on protestantism.

          • The Eastern Churches protested. Ergo – protestantism.

          • Pubcrawler

            Protested at an innovation. Who then is diverging from tradition?

          • Ecumenicalism in those days would have been akin to herding cats. 1000 years later and its now emerging it was all a “misunderstanding”.

          • William Lewis

            No true Scotsman…

          • len

            The RCC has cornered the market on error apostasy and heresy. Had a head start on the Protestants I might add.

          • PessimisticPurple

            That’s like saying don’t blame the burglar who breaks into your house.

          • carl jacobs

            No one broke into the RCC. Vatican II was an inside job.

          • PessimisticPurple

            Yes, an inside job of people practicing Protestantism.

          • William Lewis

            Surely the “Protestants” are those who protest against Vatican II?

          • Cressida de Nova

            It is very simple. Protestantism was founded by a promiscuous serial murderer. It has no validity. No thinking Protestant could disagree. Legitimacy has only been accepted because it has survived for so long.As Protestantism has no validity the Catholic Church should never have adopted Protestant ways. By incorporating them into mainstream, Catholicism has destroyed Catholic culture for generations.
            Frankly I am tired of explaining to new priests with faltering English the basic tenets of the religion.Seminaries, their teaching practices and content should be transparent and made accountable to Catholics.There is too much secrecy
            at too many levels in the juggernaut institution of the Church

            I think the damage has been done and I do not see a solution.
            Why did Vatican II happen anyway? Was it because people were leaving the Church?

          • Goodness knows why Vatican II happened. Pressure to reach out to the world by adopting more ecumenical methods and a desire to update doctrine to make it more suited to the modern age.

          • Martin

            PP

            You know it’s funny how Rome decided that it wanted to be the premier congregation and, despite setbacks in the East, managed to subdue all the churches in the West to its unbiblical rule. It was the acts of brave men filled with the Holy Spirit, from many countries, that eventually brought freedom for Christians to once more believe the Bible openly.

          • Pubcrawler

            Last time I was there, Bavaria was still pretty papist. But maybe I wasn’t paying too much attention because of the Rauchbier.

        • Ivan M

          If one wants children in this age one has to marry young, say by the time the female is about 17 or 18. Peak fertility will ensure that kids are conceived and delivered without much thought.

      • Elaine of Astolat

        I would think it might be debatable that she were not as interested in certain domestic issues certainly.

    • Elaine of Astolat

      Children are for middle easterns and uneducated women of course.

  • chiefofsinners

    The key question is how this controversy plays out with Conservative party members. They are the only constituency to which Andrea needs to appeal to win this contest, and she has already won them over in the referendum debate. A little victimhood, being mugged by the establishment press, will not go amiss.
    Some of the blue rinse brigade will also be quietly thinking that not having children is indeed a bit of an issue for Terry May.
    Overall, team Leadsom will sleep well tonight.

    • St Martyr

      GOOD! I’m an atheist Lib Dem person but my god am I voting for Andrea! My Mum a typical black Christian is thrilled but I’m STILL an atheist. I just know,see, believe we live in an Judaeo christian world and we must support this.

      • chiefofsinners

        That’s interesting. Why are you an atheist?

        • sarky

          Why not?

          • chiefofsinners

            Thank you, Sarky. I was hoping for something a little more intellectually rigorous, given the far-reaching implications.
            Come to think of it, that’s why I wasn’t asking you.

          • sarky

            Bit of a pointless question. He/she is probably an atheist for exactly the same reasons every other atheist is an atheist.

          • chiefofsinners

            I was not aware that you all think exactly the same.
            He/she may wish to speak for his/her self. Apologies to he/she if s/he is transgender, of course.

      • Matt A

        How can you vote when you are lib dem?

    • bluedog

      Astute. One presumes that the Tory ‘grandees’ allegedly supporting the Leadsom campaign would neither do so, nor misleadingly encourage her to continue, if they did not believe the party membership was likely to be supportive.

  • jsampson45

    In a proper democracy the whole country would elect its prime minister.

    • Inspector General

      Did you elect YOUR boss at work…

    • chiefofsinners

      Cameron made it clear before the last election that he would not see out the five years as PM.
      In a democracy a government sees out its term of office, regardless of individuals, who will always come and go.

  • Jolly Roger

    The choice that has been set before the Tory Party membership seems to be thus.

    On the one hand is the choice to vote down the Referendum result by electing a Remainer who might freeze Brexit in the departure lounge of a half-way house arrangement. That choice also involves the simultaneous rejection of the social conservative view that Leadsom seems to represent, albeit tentatively (she abstained on the same-sex marriage vote).

    On the other hand is the choice to uphold the Referendum result by electing a Leaver. That choice also involves a simultaneous rejection of the sort of Blairism that May most definitely represents.

    How many Conservative Party members are social conservatives, especially after reports of shrinking membership?

    “I have set before you life and death; choose life therefore…”

  • Martin

    I think we should all remember that the Times is stablemate to the Sun, and of course the once News of the World now renamed the Sun on Sunday, or some such. We cannot expect honesty from a newspaper with such a management.

    • Pubcrawler

      True of all newspapers.

      • Martin

        But especially of the Times.

  • Politically__Incorrect

    One thing we can be sure of in this leadership contest is that the media will mostly fail to be objective and will mostly take sides with the current establishment. Having just fought and lost a grubby smear campaign over our membership of the EU, they are going to do the same over the Tory leadership. Papers like The Times, once trustworthy broadsheets, have now become tools of the establishment that frequently stoop to lying and smearing in order to peddle their views. This is not just a contest about the Tory leadership, it is a contest between truth and lies. The lies in this case come from those who consider it their duty to take offence, whether they feel offended or not. It is not enough that their opponent, in this case Mrs Leadsom, should express an opinion they disagree with, she must be portrayed as evil for doing so. This is the same kind of claptrap we heard over the murder of Jo Cox during the referendum campaign, and I’m sure we are going to hear plenty more over the next few weeks.

  • Elaine of Astolat

    Yep. You can be a woman. But not a mother. Mothers are to be mocked, derided and looked down upon. And you can’t promote it, nor trad. marriage of course.

    • Welcome. We have our very Sir Lancelot on this site. See if you can spot him.

      • Pubcrawler

        Not Linus, surely?

        • carl jacobs

          Obviously the Inspector.

          • Pubcrawler

            Nah, too obvious.

        • Most certainly not.

      • The Explorer

        Any clues? Or is your upvote of Carl the answer?

        • The Inspector is a fine specimen of a man – probably.

          • len

            ‘The Inspector’ is a automated response robot ……..malfunctioning

        • carl jacobs

          You see that Jack is being evasive, deliberately ambiguous, and non-responsive. This is not his fault. It’s simply a habit he has acquired from his extended practice of Catholic apologetics.

      • Elaine of Astolat

        Is he a brexiteer though?

  • Dreadnaught

    I propose that there should be a tax based on every 3rd child and increasing exponentially for every child thereafter. Rug rats are a consequence not a right.
    I don’t know if I’m at all serious here – just positing the prospect.

    • Daniel Smith

      I wouldn’t say there should be a tax on 3 children or above. However, I don’t believe child benefit should be available with your 3rd or more. People shouldn’t expect the state to pay for their children.

      • Dreadnaught

        Even more so with children from polygamous relationships.

      • sarky

        Absolutely!!!!!!!

    • bluedog

      Ridiculous.

      • Dreadnaught

        No more ridiculous than religion.

        • bluedog

          ‘I don’t know if I’m at all serious here…’ Says it all.

          • Dreadnaught

            Just threw it in for openers … it may well be ridiculous, but so is the concept of other people paying for someone else’s lifestyle choices as sarky and Daniel Smith constructively responded.

          • bluedog

            A comment that begs the question of what is someone’s lifestyle choice. We read that increasing numbers of people, up to one third of the adult population, will never marry and will never have children. Indeed, in the UK the birth-rate among the census defined white British is around 1.6. It follows that those who do raise families should be reimbursed by those who do not. Otherwise the family orientated are paying for the lifestyle choices of the willingly childless. Clearly there are many who are unwillingly childless, such as Mrs May. But it seems important not to simply attack the fecund in an infertile society with a birth rate below replacement.

          • Dreadnaught

            The obvious answer is to have a focused immigration policy that will offset the discrepancy. We educate our females to the same level as males and their return to work after starting a family makes a tremendous contribution to the economy.
            Controlling population growth is the only way to buy time for the human race. It is the only moral and responsible way to proceed. We on an Island, should be only too aware of what is sustainable and reserve the authority to say who we allow to settle in this land.

          • bluedog

            ‘The obvious answer is to have a focused immigration policy that will offset the discrepancy.’

            Really? An even more obvious answer is to give the native British an incentive to breed rather than shag. It was never a problem in the past and we’ve populated a few continents on the proceeds.

    • sarky

      I’ve got 3 and never claimed a penny for any of them. Just remember all the extra vat I pay on all the ‘stuff’ they require.
      I have no problem with big families just as long as you pay for them!!!!!

    • carl jacobs

      Denmark has produced a video basically begging its citizens to have children. Bribing them, even. It’s called “Do it for Denmark.” The Gov’t did this. You shouldn’t do anything to discourage births. You need as many as you can get.

      Unless you want to become an extension of Pakistan.

      • Dreadnaught

        You shouldn’t do anything to discourage births. You need as many as you can get.
        Unless you want to become an extension of Pakistan.

        There’s no way to discriminate in favour of indigenous Caucasians over others who are already here: which is what is required if we are to preserve our culture and way of life.
        As for your last point – its too late already to avoid that in many areas here.
        Low birthrate in the US (1.88 in 2013) shows that such levels are not exclusive to Europe.

      • Uncle Brian

        A long time ago, in the seventies or early eighties, from memory, the French government of the day (Giscard d’Estaing? Mitterrand?) started giving tax breaks to encourage la famille nombreuse. I don’t remember the details, but from the third child onward they could claim a tax rebate of some kind, rising to 100 percent for the fifth or sixth child. Maybe Linus/Eustace can supply the details.

        • donadrian

          Spain certainly used to have a considerable range of concessions and awards to encourage the ‘la familia numerosa’.

  • IanCad

    We men are no longer. What more evidence do we need to accept the fact that our collective emasculation is almost complete?
    Now the Labour Party is also about to get a female – of sorts – leader.
    Where are the males who, in the fulfillment of their natural roles, will stand up and call a halt to this outrage?
    Are there none who will acquit themselves as men and take control, lead, instruct, protect and order the course of our, and our families lives?
    I intend to suffer such indignities no longer. It is time for us males to reclaim our authority. If none will be found to lead then I shall. You just see! There will be action – rebellion – re-assertion of leadership. Very soon. Just as soon as I finish feeding the cats, cleaning off the countertops, doing the dishes, and getting Mamma her morning tea.

    • chiefofsinners

      We must look to Nicky Morgan who, early in the competition when she was thinking of running, said she thought there should be a woman in the final two. By the same logic she surely now thinks there should be a man. Just waiting for her to say it.

      • James60498 .

        Why did you do that COS? Remind me of that woman.

        The very definition of an extremist.

        Voted against “gay marriage”, but then within a very short period indeed changed her mind and is now going round demanding that everyone (especially in schools) support it.

        Such behaviour is recognised as one of the indicators to look out for when searching for extremists. Indeed this is one of the indicators that teachers in the schools that Morgan is responsible for are supposed to use to recognise extremist Muslims.

        The irony seems to be lost on the press.

        • chiefofsinners

          All very true. She has been radicalised by Abu Retarda, high priest of political correctness.
          What’s more I understand Miss Piggy is suing for infringement of image copyright.

    • She’s a Lesbian.

  • layanglicana

    Forget the issue of motherhood for a moment. The reason the Times interview reveals Mrs Leadsom as unfit for a senior post in government is that, while predicting, out loud, how her words would be read, she went ahead and said them anyway, as she put it, ‘really carefully’. Such a degree of naivety…: “Leadsom: So, really carefully, because I am sure, I don’t really know Theresa very well but I am sure she will be really sad she doesn’t have children so I don’t want this to be ‘Andrea has children, Theresa hasn’t’, because I think that would be really horrible”

    • bluedog

      Hard to get your point other than that Leadsom may need to widen her vocabulary beyond excessive use of ‘really’. But is this a valid reason for the Conservative Party membership to reject her candidacy? It is after all upon them that the decision now rests.

      • DanJ0

        “I am certain”, “I am absolutely sure”, “I am really” … these are what politicians seem to be taught to say these days. It’s as though saying “I am absolutely certain that I haven’t got an absolute position on this” is somehow better than simply not holding a strong opinion and saying so.

        • The Explorer

          Good to see you contributing again, DanJ0

        • len

          No absolutes anymore Danjo….which is the problem with secularist Governments…..

          • DanJ0

            If only we could go back to 450-500 years ago when Christian governments handled absolutes.

          • len

            No need to go back that far…. Danjo

        • That’s why Mr Farage is so popular, you don’t hear him coming out with all that space filling gunk.

      • IanCad

        And, speaking as a member, I shall have a hard time supporting Leadsom and will reject May out of hand.
        I’m not sure what form the ballot paper will take but I am tempted to write “FARAGE” in bold, black ink. That is, unless John Baron or David Davis indicate a willingness to serve as protest candidates.

        • bluedog

          Not much to be gained by voting for an individual who is either not a member of the Conservative Party or a member who is not standing.

          • IanCad

            Most of the members I know are dissatisfied with either candidate. A protest vote may go some way in getting the message across.

          • bluedog

            But what precisely are they protesting about? Brexit? May is a Remainian who can be relied upon to use the Brexit vote to renegotiate Britain’s membership of the EU, with Cameron pulling the strings.

            With May, Brexit will be declared but not implemented.

            With Leadsom, Brexit will be both implemented and declared. Your colleagues need to stumble towards their priorities.

          • IanCad

            Sure, Leadsom is a Leaver but she did sign that letter which leaves open the question of her commitment to the cause.
            We have voted out and will stay in I’m afraid.

          • bluedog

            Leadsom is backed by Real Leavers, not just Provisional Leavers. If she doesn’t deliver Brexit she should would be kneecapped, or worse.

          • There is hope IanCad, Nigel who is working his last two years out in Brussels has a plan. He will be doing all he can to oversee and ensure we damn well leave. Whoever attends the negotiations from our end will have to meet up with Mr Farage and his team.

          • Anton

            Remember Thatcher’s rise…

    • DanJ0

      Leadsom comes across as out of her depth in interviews. She looks uncomfortable and she struggles to respond. It’s simple lack of experience in high office, and probably lack of media training too. The god thing was a bit out of order but she needs to get her answer down pat, and she should have prepared for that beforehand. Tim Farron got similar treatment and I thought he handled it better, though not perfectly.

  • James60498 .

    I see that it is reported that some May (Cameron) supporters are talking to some Blairites about joining together to start a new party if Mrs Leadsom wins the election.

    About time they acknowledged the truth of their situation.

    Perhaps their founder and his self proclaimed heir will be President and VP respectively.

    • chiefofsinners

      This is a new low in the campaign. “Elect me or I’ll split the party” says Terry May, albeit through her henchmen. Portraying herself as the unity candidate was bad enough, but this is open treason.

      • Anton

        Can you be sure she authorised it?

        • chiefofsinners

          She will have made sure that no-one can be sure.

          • Uncle Brian

            “Maintaining deniabilty” is the technical term for that, I believe.

  • len

    Bit off thread but….I wonder if all these new labour party members (£3 lot) are in actuality Conservative voters trying to keep ‘comedy Corbyn’ in power?.Or is that just a conspiracy theory too far?

    • Could very well be.

    • dannybhoy

      More likely idealistic youngsters old enough to vote but not mature enough to accept responsibility for the consequences..

  • len

    This storm in a teacup over remarks by Andrea Ledsome have been whipped up and maintained by those who opposed her …end of story. Well it should be.Politicians are imperfect people in an imperfect world and they make mistakes just like all the rest of us. Blair, Brown, Cameron, Milliband, Corbyn,take your pick?.

    • Dreadnaught

      But it really does show how an innocent, honest statement that defends the leave argument against accusations of a leave vote is a vote against tomorrows generation has been used to feed the appetites of media shit-stirers. AL’s lack of experience in the heat from the spot-light will I am sure, simply be part of the political learning curve for her. Nothing wrong with her argument but naivete.

  • bluedog

    Can’t put my finger on it, Your Grace, but there’s something missing in the entire debate. Hold on… just a minute… it’s becoming clearer. As yet an Anglican prelate has not berated Mrs Leadsom for declaring her Christian faith. One would think that any progressive cleric would recognise Mrs Leadsom’s assertion as being divisive and lacking the culturally sensitive inclusiveness needed to govern modern Britain. Indeed, there is no sign of ‘modern values’, to quote Nick Boles MP, in Mrs Leadsom’s praise of the nuclear family. Now who will be the first CofE bishop to pronounce?

    • chiefofsinners

      Ah yes, modern values. Which dictate that you can be fined £5000 for taking the egg of any wild bird, but you can have as many abortions as you want, for whatever reason you want.

      • dannybhoy

        As a prolific birds’ nester in his childhood days, Danny would probably still be paying off fines for taking thrush’s and sparrows’ eggs for his collection.
        Plus facing class actions brought by orphaned blackbirds…. ;0(

      • carl jacobs

        Birds are more valuable than children, you know.

        • chiefofsinners

          As the Lord said: “you are not worth many sparrows”… oh, hang on a minute…

  • carl jacobs

    Children have become incidental. Western culture now equates the decision to have children with the decision to not have children. Autonomous man declares the primacy of his Autonomy. The scandal is caused when someone says “It’s better to have children” because this is an implied moral attack on those who refused the obligation. We are supposed to say “It’s OK to have them and it’s OK not to have them. It’s our choice.”

    But it’s not OK to willfully refuse the obligation. It’s an incredibly selfish act.

    • PessimisticPurple

      May is unable to have children. Not quite the same thing, now, is it? Whether or not your statement regarding the obligation to have children is correct, any person who insinuates there is something wrong with another because they can’t have children is a moral degenerate.

      • carl jacobs

        any person who insinuates there is something wrong with another because they can’t have children…

        But of course I’ve never said that. You really want me to say that, for some reason. That’s an interesting question in its own right.

        • PessimisticPurple

          No, you’ve never said that. Neither has Leadsom. She insinuated it, which is why I used the word “insinuates”.

          • carl jacobs

            I seriously doubt she insinuated any such thing. A more charitable reading would attribute this whole episode to a lack of familiarity with handling the press.

    • Inspector General

      Look old fellow. You have, what the British would say, ‘gone off on one’. You seem to obsessed of late.

      • carl jacobs

        There is no better measure of the fundamental sickness of Western culture than the disparity between its fertility rate and its wealth. Do you want to see where Secularism leads? That’s where you look.

        • Inspector General

          Yes Yes Yes, but do clam down. You’re with friends here…

        • Anton

          Not secularism. Financial disincentive and lack of hope. It did for the Roman empire and that wasn’t secular.

  • Inspector General

    The chess playing Inspector is still awed by Mrs Leadsom’s opening gambit. It’s a good enough line, children and the family, to win with. The Conservative ladies will certainly be impressed – an observation the Inspector can make having met many of these wonderful gals over the years.

    Now, can this man humbly suggest to the lady herself that she continues in this vein and promises legislation that will allow the Catholic Adoption Agencies to once again give hope to the boys and girls for whom the promise of a mother AND father would be the greatest of gifts in their unsettled lives.

    Legislation would be required to exempt from misguided so called equality law, and she will be opposed by certain types who value their recent privileged ascendancy, but the interests of the displaced boys and girls must prevail. It’s what Jesus would want.

    • carl jacobs

      Sir Lancelot arrives. But are the vows of Guinevere still intact? Inquiring minds want to know.

      Hey, don’t blame me, Inspector. This was Jack’s idea.

      • len

        More like’ Sir Prancealot’ ?

    • James60498 .

      Whilst many people left the party over “gay marriage”, this was in fact my final straw issue.

      When Blair at least claimed to be considering allowing an exemption to Catholic Agencies, his heir made it clear that no such exemption should be allowed and that he would be voting against such an exemption should the government of the time propose it. On reading this I got up from my chair, walked over to my computer and cancelled my monthly SO to the party.

      Of course the exemption should not only apply to Catholic Agencies but that was what was under consideration at the time.

      • Inspector General

        Indeed James, ALL adoption agencies it must be. There is so much to put right after Blair-Brown-Cameron that an immediate start is called for in loosening the bounds that these governments have put around the very people they are supposed to serve.

        Let adoption be the vanguard…says I !!

    • dannybhoy

      Absolutely.
      Not that great a fan of adoption, but whether long or short term fostering, the best possible outcome will require a Mum and a Dad..
      And I speak as one who with his wife has fostered kids, but has never had kids of his own.
      Something to do with ‘blanks’…

      • Dreadnaught

        I would prefer to use the expression a male and female Mum and Dad.

        • dannybhoy

          No problemo, nit-picker..
          But anyway a Mum has to be female, and a Dad has to be a male..
          Danny has no time for gender bendering.

          • Dreadnaught

            Nit-picker – Who me?

          • dannybhoy

            You’ve never heard us talk in hushed tones of “Dreadders the NitPicker?”

    • David

      Hear hear !

    • Hi inspector

      Do you think now we’ve left the EU , the imperial system will be reintroduced , like we’ll go back to pound , shilling and pence,? although why the pence is quoted by the letter d is a mystery to me. Like there’s 16 shillings in a pence and 240 pence in a pound. A guinea is £1.25. The farthing is half a penny and the five Bob note – whatever that is – is queer. It’s very confusing.

      • IanCad

        Hannah – you must not remember the wonderful Imperial coinage.
        A farthing was one quarter of a penny. Twelve pennies to the shilling. Twenty shillings to the pound. Two shillings – Two bob. Two and a half shillings – Half a crown. One guinea – one pound one shilling. An ancient amount beloved by solicitors and shysters.
        Then there was the ha’penny, the three penny bit and the sixpence. All lovely stuff.

      • IrishNeanderthal

        £sd (occasionally written Lsd) is the popular name for the pre-decimal currencies once common throughout Europe.

        It is of Roman origin, and stands for Libra, Solidus, Denarius (or their plural equivalent). In French, solidus became contracted to sou, and solidatus (shilling-paid) to soldat: in English, soldiers would talk of being paid “The King’s shilling.” And denarius morphed into those dinars that you find here, there and everywhere.

      • CliveM

        We can hope not!

      • Anton

        I do hope so. And Fahrenheit. And roods and chains and furlongs, and fathoms, and feet and inches and yards, and acres. And British Thermal Units.

      • Uncle Brian

        Everything started going downhill when they did away with the farthing.

        • chiefofsinners

          I know. Farting is a lot of fun, but so frowned upon nowadays by the establishment.

          • Just for you ….

          • chiefofsinners

            Now I understand your avatar.

          • Distant cousins.

          • dannybhoy

            And then there were thre’penny bits…

          • len

            Still got some, a pocket full of these and you had some real weight….

          • chiefofsinners

            Soon to return as the new £1 coin. All part of regaining our sovereignty.

      • Maalaistollo

        (a) ‘Pence’ is plural. ‘Penny’ is singular.

        (b) The ‘d’ signifies denarius (in the same way as the £ signifies libra).

        (c) There are 12 pence to the shilling.

        (d) A guinea is 21 shillings, ie £1.05.

        (e) A farthing (as the anglo-saxon origin of the name suggests) is a fourth of a penny.

        (f) As for the five-bob note, I suggest that you consult the Inspector, who is an authority on the detection of such things.

      • sarky

        Just after the referendum there was an article about a butcher who has reverted to selling in lb’s and oz’s !!!!

        • Hi

          I’m glad we still do beer in pints and not metric, thou.

        • Busy Mum

          I’ve never stopped asking for my meat and fruit&veg in lbs and ozs…passive resistance and all that….I teach my children to bake in imperial too. It’s so much easier for them to remember that it’s one egg for every two ozs flour, sugar and butter in a basic cake.

          • sarky

            Mine too. Even the ingredients for school cooking lessons are in imperial.

      • len

        Five bob note?

        • Uncle Brian

          On cable here they’ve been showing some of the old 1940s Sherlock Holmes films with Basil Rathbone and Nigel Bruce, but the Brazilian translators who do the subtitles haven’t been too well briefed on the British background. “Five bob” in the dialogue shows up in the subtitles as “£5”.

          The geography, too, has its peculiarities. In Terror by Night, when Holmes and Watson set out from Baker Street to catch the night train to Edinburgh, they tell the cab driver to take them to “Houston”.

          • len

            Five bob (two ‘half crowns’) was my pocket money back in the mists of time, and a ten bob note was given to me on my birthday(felt quite rich to have a note in those days…)

            Those old Basil Rathbone ‘Sherlock Holmes ‘were classics and were shown here in the UK not long ago…Taking a cab from Edinburgh to’ Houston’ would be be quite a feat!..

            I remember in one of the films Holmes was boarding a plane and it looked like it was made of wood covered in canvas..No one would get on it nowadays!..

          • Uncle Brian

            Those Basil Rathbone pictures are still more fun to watch, for me at least, than most of the recent Sherlock Homes pictures either with Downey or Cumberbatch. The new films take themselves far too seriously. I remember a couple of pictures from the seventies that I Iiked, though, The Seven Percent Solution and The Private Life of Sherlock Holmes.

          • dannybhoy

            Ermmmm.. we have a problem.

          • Uncle Brian

            A three-pipe problem?

          • len

            Possibly four or more?.

          • dannybhoy

            I was thinking more along the lines of Houston..
            but pipes’ll do it.

          • Uncle Brian

            When they got out of the cab you could see the name of the station. It was Euston.

          • dannybhoy

            I sometimes use subtitles with modern films as the background fx often overwhelms the dialogue. I have noticed some weird words, but I never realised the subbies were done by foreign companies.

          • Uncle Brian

            This is Brazil, the subtitles are in Portuguese. Or, alternatively, the dubbing, which I don’t like.

          • dannybhoy

            “There’s an awful lot of copy in Brazil..”
            Remind me again, why exactly did you flee the land of your birth?
            I understand Brazil is very humid?

          • Uncle Brian

            My employers transferred me to São Paulo at one point, after I’d been working for them in London a few years. After that, one thing led to another …

          • dannybhoy

            Fascinating. Brasilia was originally a modern masterpiece was it not? For a long time they had Brazil down as an imminent boom economy, but I think they’re still waiting. Lot of corruption as I understand it, but the evangelical church is growing still I heard.

          • Uncle Brian

            An imminent boom economy – yes, you could say that. What Brazilians say about their own country is, “Brazil is the country of the future, and always will be.”

          • dannybhoy

            So what’s it like living there? Taxes, council taxes and so on like here? What about the health service? What do you miss about England? I assume it’s not the greenery?

        • Hi

          The 9 shilling note , my mistake!

          • len

            10 bob note. I am old enough to remember them!… Just..

          • dannybhoy

            Just?
            Danny grew up with them. They were a kind of reddish colour.
            A pahnd was green and a fiver was white with flowery writing. Then it shrank and became blue.
            Incidentally, you could get four chews for a penny when i was a kid. And a Mars bar was bigger, harder and cost fourpence..
            At age 15 I was getting a half crown a week pocket money..

          • len

            You sound about the same age as me Danny….’just ‘ was a tongue in cheek comment 😉

          • dannybhoy

            Danny feels no shame about his age len..
            Proud to be an old codger, that’s me.

          • Uncle Brian

            I have a vague recollection of getting 3d a week pocket money in the nineteen forties. It was the price of a Walls ice cream at the local newsagents, which was usually where it went.

      • Pubcrawler

        One penny is represented as ‘d’ for ‘denarius’, as pound is represented ‘l’ for ‘libra’, from the days when admin was done in Latin.

        A farthing is a quarter of a penny. Twelve pence in a shilling. Two shillings to a florin. Five shillings to a crown. Twenty shillings to a pound.

        The ‘Guinea’ thing is because of changes in the relative price of silver and gold: a gold sovereign was originally worth one pound (20 shillings) Sterling, but this fluctuated up to about 30 shillings at times, before being fixed at 21 shillings (£1.05). The gold used was sourced primarily from Guinea, hence the name.

        • Uncle Brian

          Here in Brazil they tell a different story. The original “guinea” sovereigns were made of a gold that had a more reddish colour, which made it look more valuable. That red gold – so they say – was brought from Portugal, originally mined in Brazil, and the name “guinea” was a misnomer.

  • chrisH

    Until the Times releases the full tape( as opposed to cutting and pasting its edits as it is likely to be doing at the moment), we can assume that it`s a parlour game stitch and bitch by Sylvesters owners.
    And-in truth, will add votes onto her bid-because we who voted out have been blooded in the truly nasty games of the liberal elite…we can see what they`re doing, hope Andrea stays strong in her faith, torus her heartlands where her friends are…and gets ready to settle with scum like Gibbon starting Sept 10th

    • Inspector General

      You’ll be amazed at how quickly the Westminster liberal elite adapt to the new reality. The Inspector was rather expecting a least a handful of EU huggers in Westminster announcing their decision to step down at the next election because they no longer wish to serve in a Brexit parliament, but as far as he knows, not one has made such a decision public…

    • Politically__Incorrect

      I suspect that Mrs Leadsom, in her role as energy minister, has not experienced the kind baiting from the journalistic pond-life that she got at the Times. However, I suspect the lady is a quick learner and will not fall for that one again. Not that she did anything wrong, she just displayed a characteristic that is alien to most politicians and the media: truthfulness. The choice for Tory party members will be between a chameleon who claims to be in favour of Brexit now despite campaigning to remain and being backed by a bunch of arch-remainers, and a woman who genuinely believes in her country and has consistently stuck to guns on the issue of leaving the EU.

  • When this story broke there was a steady stream of updates on my Facebook timeline from friends and colleagues. The wording of each was broadly similar – a strong condemnation, followed by how the remarks mean Leadsom can’t be PM, followed by a backing for Theresa May. It all looked rather organised to me. Maybe it wasn’t, but the pattern didn’t sit comfortably with me, and my profession requires me to spot odd patterns and trends.

    • Hmm. Run the wording through Google and see what lines up. Most likely an article or two. Most pols can’t organise their way out of a wet paper bag…and it shows.

    • Politically__Incorrect

      It shows how easily some people are duped by the mainstre mis-ledia

      • dannybhoy

        I like that. ‘Misledia’ is very apt.

  • David

    The country desperately needs a sincere, Christian political leader who is wholeheartedly behind Brexit. The liberal-left elements in all parties will huff and puff for a few days but soon fall into line to protect their salaries. If we had such leadership for say, two Parliamentary terms, it would make a real difference to the nature of politics and the sorts of people who join it. The body politic needs an injection of wholesome values after so many years of the corrupt and self-serving in control.

    We must pray that the patriotic elements within the Conservative Party itself, who are well outside the treacherous, traitorous corridors of Westminster and the inward looking bubble of the M25, with its brainwashed EUphiles, do the right thing and vote for Leadson. Then Brexit will be properly underway. We can get the old ship of State firmly onto the right heading and with a good wind filling her sails.

    • dannybhoy

      I’m not sure I agree David. A moral person, with integrity yes. A person of conviction certainly.
      Christians conduct themselves according to different values. We are called to love each other, to put others before self, to confess our sins and failings and forgive those who sin against us.
      We are in the world, but not of it, and so whilst I believe all Christians should have an awareness and interest in politics; perhaps even to serve up to a level where they feel comfortable, the office of Prime Minister requires rather more flexibility and ruthlessness than a practicing Christian could provide..

      • David

        You make an interesting points using reasoned arguments there.
        But are you saying that you want to “sub-contract” to a more ruthless non-believer ? If so, is this a tad hypocritical ? An extreme example of that line of reasoning are the pacifist Quakers of early America who were happy to be defended by their less scrupulous neighbours who were practicing protestants of one sort or another.

        However that aside I fail to see why Christians cannot be certainly very determined and dogged in pursuing a necessary, if unpleasant line.

        • dannybhoy

          “But are you saying that you want to “sub-contract” to a more ruthless non-believer ?”
          Kinda.
          As our friend Dreadders would point out, there are good moral people who are not (yet) Christians.
          Can you imagine the criticism that would come from other Christians if policies were implemented that some found unloving or judgemental?
          Look at the flak Justin Welby faces! (Danny goes a deep pink)
          America (the Beautiful) was rather different. It was framed in the world view and values of Christians and religious people of that time. Their motivation and views would have been very similar. They were prepared to make sacrifices and as Christians they would not have seen that they were ‘stealing’ someone else’s land. They believed God had led them there..

    • IanCad

      Further David, the membership – or at least those who are so inclined – should write in a candidate of their choice. Neither May nor Leadsom is the type of chap to lead us into the age of liberty.
      There must be another choice. There is still time.

      • David

        I agree overall, but I am dealing with the situation as it presents itself to me, a non-Conservative Party member.
        But do by all means, please find and promote a better one if you’re able to do that.

      • James60498 .

        There isn’t still time. At least not for this election.

        No one else can enter. No one else can put their name forward or have any votes counted. Those are the rules.

        May is Cameron in a skirt. Apart from being far more sly.

        For most of us this is like a foreign election where we may have a view. For you it is serious.

        You have a vote. If you want Cameron back then vote May. Otherwise you know what to do.

      • David

        Too late Ian. It has just been announced.
        See the Breitbart London news flash.
        Leadson has been ritually humiliated and May will now proceed to take the crown. This represent an opportunity to unite the right that has been squandered by putting party before country.
        Unlike if Leadson had emerged as a fully committed Brexiteer, Ukip will now, with a new backer and a new leader soon, mount the second campaign to achieve a true Brexit by attacking the dying shell of Labour and the Conservatives who have elected a leader with a track record or vacillation, compromise and very little true conviction.

  • len

    What we are seeing now is the power of the Media to point the people in ‘the right direction’ to get’ the right result’ for the establishment.. . Having escaped one dictatorship(the EU) ‘the puppet masters’ are making sure that they have their woman at the helm so they remain in control regardless.
    Is liberty just an illusion or can the people really take back control as promised?

  • chiefofsinners

    Ladies and gentlemen, for your delectation, Tom Lehrer on motherhood…
    https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=2Xfv6iXvbJ4

  • sarky

    So Leadsom has quit. Unfortunately inexperience did for her.

    • CliveM

      Will they reopen nominations?

      • sarky

        Nope, May’s the new PM. Apparently she has given reassurances on brexit.

        • CliveM

          Snort and there was Cameron hoping the campaign would take long enough for one last G20 jolly!

          Nothing seems to be going as he hoped these days.

          • sarky

            Especially a quiet afternoon at the tennis!!!!!

        • len

          Cast iron assurances?

  • Hi

    Well I just see English people abroad sometimes not wanting to drink half a litre because they think it’s like half a pint or they’ll try and order a litre of Guinness.

    • sarky

      A litre of Guinness….mmmmmmmm

  • Eustace

    Breaking news…

    Leadsom takes advantage of out offered by motherhood comments to bolt for exit and avoid having to publish dodgy tax return.

    “I am relieved that my dubious financial arrangements will not become public property!” she may have quoted, oblivious to the fact that now she has the press on her tail, it’s only a matter of time.

    Run and hide, Mrs Leadsom. They’re coming for you and they know exactly where to find you.

    Another corrupt Brexiteer politician bites the dust. At this rate you’ll never leave.

    • The Explorer

      “At this rate you’ll never leave.”

      Perhaps your own departure was premature? Or have you departed from the human race, rather than from Britain?

      • carl jacobs

        Now, now. Let’s give credit where credit is due. Linus is an expert at running and hiding. He speaks with immense credibility on the subject. Why, even now he is hiding in (ahem) “France”.

        • Eustace

          Abandoning a foundering old hulk is not “running and hiding”. I wasn’t the captain so I’m not obliged to go down with the ship. I was merely a reluctant passenger who saw disaster coming and decided that dry land was the safest place to be.

          Unfortunately business obliges me to return to the doomed vessel later this week. But I have a return ticket and a lifejacket, so I can face the prospect with equanimity. A couple of weeks to tie up all the loose ends and I’ll be a free man. Hopefully May’s honeymoon period will last that long and widespread civil unrest won’t mar my brief visit.

          My strange English neighbour has expressed interest in buying my house. Planning permission for a giga-basement complete with Olympic sized swimming pool, tennis court and day spa having been turned down, he has no choice but to expand sideways. He’s end of terrace, so there’s only one way to go. Apparently I can name my price.

          Perhaps there is a God after all… Nah, just joking. The miserable little tribal totem you sad people worship would hate someone like me if he actually existed…

    • sarky

      Errrrrmm….Didn’t she publish them a couple of days ago??

      • dannybhoy

        Not in Eustaceville.

      • Eustace

        She declared one year of tax returns. May declared four.

        It reeks of “something to hide”. What she doesn’t realise that standing down won’t save her. Some one or several eager beaver Fleet street hacks are already on the case. Irregularities will be exposed. And each one will be another nail in her political coffin.

        All this Tory bloodletting is almost as much fun as riding to hounds. First Cameron, then Johnson, then Gove, now Leadsom. Who’s next? There aren’t many left to eliminate.

  • len

    The establishment is taking down the opposition and showing where the real power lies.
    In or out of the EU ‘the world system’ remains the same…corrupt.

  • carl jacobs

    From the outside looking in, this seems like the correct result. Andrea Leadsom presented herself as hopelessly overmatched by the job. What this actually demonstrates is that the Leave forces had no coherent plan to execute if they won. This is an organizational failure. Andrea Leadsom should never have been the candidate to carry the torch.

    • len

      Don`t think the’ Remain’ camp has much of a plan either because they haven`t got a clue what the future holds.

      • James60498 .

        The only plan they have is to blame all the problems already existing in the economy on the Referendum result.

        As went the conversation between a banker, a property lawyer, a managing partner in a legal firm and a businessman of 30 years experience, and with a son who works in the City (oh yes, I was there too) that I have just come out of this afternoon.

    • dannybhoy

      Andrea did well in presenting the case for Brexit with Boris and Gisela Stuart.
      She appears to know her stuff, but clearly isn’t Prime Minister material.
      I agree with you that the Brexiteers had no clear strategy for how to disengage from the EU. This is incredibly sad in that we UKIPers also had loads oif time to formulate an exit programme, and we didn’t.
      At the risk of upsetting my fellow Brits I remember reading an article during the aftermath of the Iraq invasion where senior American military personnel said that although the Brits were disciplined and courageous, they had no clear plan for managing Basra..
      http://www.ft.com/cms/s/0/2591095c-4f34-11dc-b485-0000779fd2ac.html

      It’s amazing really as when we had an Empire we managed it very well with very few civil servants..

  • David

    Andrea Leadson, having been attacked by her enemies within the Conservative Party and the whole of the left-liberal MS media, has just announced her withdrawal from the leadership race.
    The utterly false, useless May will now proceed to try to betray the nation’s desire for a convincing Brexit.
    Looks like its business as usual with the Conservatives putting party above country, and electing a so called unity leader. But this will certainly frustrate national unity.
    Ukip will now prepare for a tough assault against the almost dead Labour Party and the badly damaged, Conservative Party.
    Stand by for the second campaign for Brexit to swing into action led by a new, invigorated Ukip leader to be elected by the whole of the party. We will win….

    • dannybhoy

      Prophecy? ;0)

    • PessimisticPurple

      Quit trying to make out that Leadsom was a victim. She tried using a low, nasty, dirty little trick and it blew back on her. She’s not the people’s champion, and she doesn’t hate “the establishment”, she wants to be a part of it. IT just didn’t want her.

      • Anna055

        When I read the (partial) transcript of her Times interview it seemed to me that she was replying to things which had been said earlier. She was trapped into implying things that she didn’t actually believe. ….but then I’ve thought for a long time that many (though not all I know) journalists are bullies….so yes I do believe that, in this case, Angela Leadsom was a victim, but so was poor Theresa May. Neither the journalist nor the editor cared about either of them. It was a wicked article.

        • Inspector General

          Not Prime Minister material if she let a journalist have her over.

          • Anna055

            You may be right, and I wish Theresa May well…..but it doesn’t alter how I view the article!

          • Inspector General

            To give you an idea of what she would have been up against – The Chancellor of Germany is demanding we still have free movement of people to trade with HER European Union! The Chancellor of Germany has a few hundred thousand unwanted migrants she wants to move – to the UK. Do you now understand what these blackguards are about?

          • Anna055

            I hope that the end result of all this works out well, and I did have my doubts about Angela Leadsom’s lack of experience in the public arena, but I still think it was a cruel and uncaring article.

          • Inspector General

            Best stroke the cat and have a good weep over it.

          • Anna055

            Not a cat fan…….Nice try though!! 🙂

          • Stroke your own pussy, Inspector.

          • Inspector General

            The Inspector has no cat, Jack. He finds them piss poor company – rather like being with just you in the small hours on this site…

          • Dreadnaught

            Not as bad as what they put Sir Cliff through though is it?

          • Inspector General

            Apparently not!

          • Anna055

            I’d forgotten that, I was thinking further back …. Jonathan Aitken….haven’t trusted most journalists since I read his book….and yes I know he lied, but so did the journalists and they didn’t go to prison.

          • Dreadnaught

            Spitting image had the journalists as pigs in hats with a card marked ‘Press’ – they had it about right.

          • Dreadnaught

            Not a name I would care to mention in any capacity. ‘My sword and my shield’ etc – shudder!

          • sarky

            And what about what he’s put us through??…..mistletoe and wine..I’m still in counseling!!!!

          • Dreadnaught

            Hahaha

          • Inspector General

            One of the most poisonous cocktails ever devised by man…

          • sarky

            I thought that accolade went to the ‘inspector’ a toxic, tasteless brew favoured by women and the lgbt community.

          • dannybhoy

            Cliff was targeted by a gloating BBC and an over zealous police force who’d had surgery to remove common sense..
            I always understood that in this country a person was innocent until proven guilty. Cliff and others have had their reputations wrecked whilst their accusers remain anonymous…
            Sue ’em Cliff, and give the money to some totally politically incorrect charity.

          • Inspector General

            #whitelivesmatter

          • dannybhoy

            As much as any other lives do. But law abiding citizens especially deserve the full protection of the law. If you deliberately break the law, how can you appeal to it?

          • CliveM

            Agreed let’s be clear she has been an MP for six years. She has had ministerial experience. If she hadn’t realised by this time that all journalists are liars and snakes, she’s perhaps a but slow on the uptake.

            If a Times journalist can do this to her, imagine what Merkel, Junker and co. would achieve.

          • Inspector General

            If the Inspector had been the subject of that interview in his own bid to be Prime Minister, the journalist would have been reported as missing by now.

            You must all read Machiavelli if you are interested in politics.

          • CliveM

            Tarts ponce or political journalist, which is lower?

          • Dreadnaught

            Journalist should be made to declare their political affiliations at the head of every article or television appearance.

          • Inspector General

            …and whether or not they are nice people or absolute rotters…

          • CliveM

            Perhaps but I’m not sure how that would have helped this situation?

          • Dreadnaught

            Yes, its a general observation but Mrs L should have have remembered not to believe all you read in the papers has stood the test of time and experience.

        • Dreadnaught

          Do you not realise that politics is a blood-sport?

          • Anna055

            Yes, but I’m not a fan of the “sportsmen”/journalists.

          • James60498 .

            It is. But it shouldn’t be.

          • Dreadnaught

            Tally-Ho!

        • David

          Quite right, and well put.
          But our friend PP above is clearly not one to try and read between the lines, to discern what is really happening.

  • Uncle Brian

    If you like your beer ice cold, as I do, 35 centilitres is a good size. It doesn’t have time to warm up.

    • carl jacobs

      Warm beer? What manner of decadent civilization would drink warm beer?

      Beer is supposed to be cold.

  • Inspector General

    It’s unfair to compare May with Cameron. Cameron would have happily split the Conservatives over Brexiting as he indeed did over same sex marriage. Women as a species don’t tend to go that far and court disruption. Unless we have another Margaret Thatcher in her, but we haven’t.

    • Uncle Brian

      Inspector, would you say it’s now a safe bet there will be no early general election? Not until 2020, as scheduled? And do you expect your friend Theresa to last out the full four years?

      • Inspector General

        Only our glorious monarch can dissolve parliament. She’ll want to know why if asked to. What answer would you give, Brian? “The Government is strong, we have the people’s mandate to leave the EU, but a few plebs have trouble understanding the British Constitution” perhaps…

  • What a bloody shambles our political system is in. All the Leave Campaign leaders have …. er …. left. They had no idea what to do, so they took to the hills.

    • Inspector General

      What!

      What an asinine comment, sir! How dare you!

      This is one of the greatest, if not the greatest, of countries on this earth. Not some damn Balkan state in the nineteenth century…

      • Dreadnaught

        What else can you expect from a fence sitting Englishman living in Scotland?

        • Inspector General

          Aye son! He’s no better than the Hun…

          • So where has dear Nige disappeared to? And sweet Boris? Now the country’s left with a PM who campaigned to remain and one who, to boot, is in favour of staying signed up to the ECHR. Utter shambles. It’s clear the Leave campaign had no real plan.

          • Inspector General

            Rather like the UK in Sep 1939. But what an outcome!

          • Yep, 20 years of austerity from 1945, the dismantling of the Empire – and then we joined the EU.

          • Inspector General

            …but no more NAZIs…

          • Inspector, sorry to disappoint but this is 2016.

          • Inspector General

            …having said that, there remain a few gay ones on Pink News…

          • Did May support homosexual ‘marriage’?

          • Inspector General

            She didn’t, but she does now. Just like any other MP who didn’t. After all, why continue to anger enraged benders who write heterphobic letters longer than you need to. But perhaps, on a vote to convert gay marriages to CP, she might be able to support that.

          • James60498 .

            Yes. Very much so.

            I am amazed that the Inspector doesn’t seem to know that.

          • Inspector General

            You are quite right, James. The Inspectorate got that wrong. However, she is still reviled by many on Pink News comments…
            ——————————-
            jmulc M-Ark • 4 days ago
            May voted against gay adoption, 2007 sexual orientation regulations, the repeal of section 28, gay adoption, equal age of consent. All of these candidates voted against gay rights, educate yourself.
            2 • Reply•Share ›
            ——————————
            You see, to be lauded by militant LGBT there is no alternative but to support EVERYTHING they want. And changing your mind later is only grudgingly appreciated. The CoE will inevitably feel the backlash from them when they proceed with changes that will accommodate just a small part of Big Gay’s agenda.

          • May is just another fair weather politician then who’ll do and say whatever to secure power.

          • Dreadnaught

            We had our freedom and paid a heavy price and the we joined the ‘Common Market’. We finished paying back the Yanks in 2000 or summat. We funded their prosperity.

          • The Americans financed the reconstruction of Western Europe.

          • Dreadnaught

            For a price.

          • Yes but along with NATO, this saved Western Europe from Communist Russia.

        • Dreadnaught, Jack is no fence sitter. He wants out of the EU but voted to remain so Britain could continue to oppose the political unification of Europe and lead its ordered disintegration from inside. The EU will surely collapse unless the shambles in this country serves as a warning to those other states contemplating leaving.

          • Anton

            What shambles? The sun still rises, the water and electricity still work, the supermarkets and petrol stations are still stocked, the law is still enforced. We need government only in the medium term and whoever thought that a popular triumph would not cause some major political turbulence? Be of stout heart!

      • carl jacobs

        But what he is saying is true. Since the vote, the Leave Campaign has made the French Army look competent and courageous by comparison. Does speaking the truth purchase Jack no credit at all?

        • This is worrying …. support from Carl.

          • carl jacobs

            Sure, that’s what you say in public. But inside you are relieved to know that wisdom and prudence are on your side.

          • Jack was being uncharitable, Carl. Probability theory suggests even you will get something correct at some point if one waits long enough.

        • Hi

          No one thought leave would win. For Boris it was supposed to be a launch pad to prime minister. Even Farage conceded half and hour after the polls closed and made a speech blaming the extra time people had to register to vote on the defeat…. that was before he retracted. They were supposed to be the heroic lot who’d live to fight another day raging against the machine they were a part of and actually benefit from . Meanwhile us grunts in the trenches did the hard work on the ground as we did in the election whilst we have had to put up with this political vanity show and watch the other side refuse to accept the vote. . But it is that last time I work on a political campaign. All of the politicians are oblivious to the realities of what voters were saying. When they do take notice it’s to smear and snear. The political class is in its own bubble ,on all sides.

          • Bastards … the lot of them.
            The Remainers have all left … except Jeremy.

          • Anton

            Who was pro-Brexit till he got to the top of the Labour Party.

    • David

      Cheer up !
      It has always been two steps forward and half a step back.
      What do you expect – harmony ?
      Remember that these are human beings, just like me and you, not the super -human creatures of historical legends.
      Soon we will be OUT again, in the rest of the world, with the wind catching our sails and oceans of opportunity to explore.
      Bet you a beer that our Irish cousins Leave too within a decade, now that their main market is heading for The Freedom Gate.

      • We risk sacrificing a generation because of reckless politicians who persuaded the nation dishonestly that they had a plan for leaving the EU.

        • Dreadnaught

          You’ve just said you wanted out of the EU! Now you’re saying you were prepared to risk ‘sacrificing’ a generation?
          We did that in two world wars with two generations. No comparison to worrying the poor little dears of today who think that they can no longer puke it up down in sunny old Majorks without a visa.

          • Jack does want out but in an orderly and planned manner. His preference was to stay until the EU project collapsed. As it is, Britain will probably serve as a warning to others not to leave and give an even greater incentive to press ahead with political and financial union.
            And it’s this generation who raised the younger generation.

          • Dreadnaught

            Jack does want out but in an orderly and planned manner.

            And that’s what the two year period is set down for.
            Cameron offered a referendum at totally the wrong time of his tenure saying nothing about resigning.
            Academisation is the attempt to take back or minimise the overt influence of the Left in the education system. Fifteen years of Labour propagation can’t be corrected overnight.

          • Inspector General

            Dream on. They are out to flog us bloody. Let’s bring the rotten thing down on top of them.

          • David

            Hear, hear Inspector. I’ll volunteer for the demolition party – I’ve been trained by Ukip !

          • Inspector General

            Best way to proceed, David. Tell them that unless they are reasonable, which they are not, we will do our utmost to destroy the EU, which we will…

          • David

            Quite Sir, quite !

          • They know that already which is why the exit deal will be painful.

          • Dreadnaught

            Rather we focus on keeping the UK intact and leave the EU to the Hungarians.

          • len

            That’s like saying I want to sit in the derelict building until it collapses around my ears?

          • Or accepting the building is coming down and working to do it safely.

          • dannybhoy

            You’ve got no sense of adventure Jack.

          • Jack is thinking of his children and his granddaughter. Really, it doesn’t effect him that much now he’s retired.

          • dannybhoy

            Fair point. Family and Grandparently duties come first.

          • len

            That would need co-operation doesn`t seem to be much of that about nowadays?

          • Anton

            They’d really listen to us like they have the last 20 years, wouldn’t they? And they’d want our money to try to shore it up.

        • David

          There should have been a plan, I agree, but then if they had thought that they’d lose, they’d never have given us a chance. It is their arrogance and unpreparedness that we used against them, to great effect !
          So we seized the only chance we’d ever have before meltdown in Europe.
          Yes it is not perfect down here, please wait for heaven for that, but most of your young people, at least the realistic ones, will soon realise that they have many more life chances with us outside the tyrannical EU.
          But perhaps nothing will cheer you up ? If so sorry, I couldn’t help.

        • Anton

          It’s not so difficult. You activate Article 50. You negotiate. We all know what the important issues are. You get the best deal you can. Then – O happy day – you leave. Talk of “sacrificing a generation” is a little melodramatic. That’s what EU monetary policy is doing in the Mediterranean countries.

    • Sybaseguru

      You may have missed the point – “Leave” was a peoples revolt against the smug “I’m all right Jack” liberal intellectuals who hang out almost exclusively in London. Its purpose was to shake them up – much like Jesus did with the Jewish leaders of his time.
      As for the SNP – their liking for Europe is extremely perverse (lets get out of one Union we can’t control and join another one we have even less control in).

      • William Lewis

        Or, let’s at least rock the boat for a bit more devolution and a bit more money.

    • len

      No one had any idea what’ leaving ‘meant that’s why there was no plan. No ones got any idea what ‘remain’ means either.
      So what we need is innovators and entrepreneurs.Lord Sugar for PM?.

  • Dreadnaught

    In this country we do not elect a Prime Minister at a general election. Our Head of State is the Monarch. The Prime Minister is the leader of the political party that has the most representatives elected. That tenure is for a fixed 5 year period. Whether this is the best system is debatable. When May takes on the role of leader of the Conservative Party due to Cameron’s resignation, she assumes the role of PM for the residue of the fixed period. She is the new leader and the temporary PM.

    The Labour Party if there is still such a concept, is calling for a General Election immediately, despite having an unelectable Leader and no Shadow Cabinet worth of the name. UKIP has one MP the same as the Greens. The Scots Natz are the only party who could possibly lay claim to being the only viable ‘Loyal’ Opposition in Westminster. Meanwhile the whole financial world is looking forward for stability and assurance that the UK is still the most stable and secure State in Europe.

    A vote of No Confidence in the Government is unlikely to appear, given the rag-tag assemblage of headless chickens masquerading as mature politicians, incapable of representing a viable Opposition required in a balanced democracy.

    We are not going to be told by Militant Tendency Trotskyists or residual centre Leftists whatever they are calling themselves today, to provide another referendum or the bleatings of the bloated ex-Mayor of a non-Country who heads the unaccountable and corrupt EU, to invoke Article 50.

    May’s real test will come in 2020 during which interim her effectiveness will be assessed. In the mean-time she is prepared to take hold of the hottest handle offered to a politician since Churchill. That alone takes some courage for which she deserves respect and the support of conservative minded people.

    • len

      No need to worry Mark Carney is still running the country..Doing a better job than the politicians..

    • Anna055

      I was impressed with what she said in Birmingham before she knew Andrea Leadsom was standing down. I agree that she is showing a lot of courage. She needs lots of prayer now.

  • Inspector General

    Breaking news. Cameron to hand over to May Wednesday evening (BBC Radio)

    God Save The Queen!

    • Dreadnaught

      Gasp! He’s faster than an English footballer hitting the beach after being knocked out of the European Cup!

      • Inspector General

        He’s a broken man – hopefully…

        • Dreadnaught

          He was best placed to go back to the EU with the referendum result in his pocket; court other alliances and form a united campaign of reform or bust.
          A missed opportunity on the scale of a Southgate penalty shot.
          Shame on Camoron.

          • Inspector General

            Nonsense, that man!

      • Sybaseguru

        I gather the English team had trouble with border control at Calais – they couldn’t meet the skills requirement for entry to the UK.

      • len

        I think the English team stayed on to watch how proper footballers did it?

        • Anton

          Good patriots, they quit Europe faster than No.10.

        • Dreadnaught

          It was beach-football Len; on the Riviera if I recall correctly.

    • God save and preserve us.

      • Inspector General

        God Preserve The Union!

        • What Union?

          • Dreadnaught

            The Union – Jack

          • Very good.

          • Dreadnaught

            How kind.

        • chiefofsinners

          It’s spelt onion. But yes, excellent for marmalade.

      • James60498 .

        Absolutely. But unlike The Queen, we don’t need to meet Theresa May every week.

        Anyone having to do that undoubtedly needs extra prayers.

    • dannybhoy

      God save our country rather. Theresa is a party apparatchik, and whilst she may have ambition. I doubt very much it extends beyond the Conservative party.
      I may be wrong. I’ll be pleased if I ‘m wrong: but I suspect the old pro EUnionists will be quietly manouvering to regain control.

  • Meet the new boss
    Same as the old boss

    We were fooled again

    Aaaaaaaaaaaaggggggghhhhh!

  • len

    A week is a short time in politics. Apart from in the Labour Party where nothing much seems to change……..

  • Anton

    Theresa May becomes PM. She reneges on enacting Brexit. Tory Brexiteer MPs join Labour in a vote of No Confidence. May is forced to call an election. UKIP stands under “3rd time lucky” Nigel Farage and wins. Farage becomes PM…

    A scenario not a prediction, but a delicious prospect and not impossible.

    • len

      Anything could happens nowadays.

    • dannybhoy

      I suspect that if Theresa tries to row back on Brexit, there will be civil unrest, and I would join in.

      • Dreadnaught

        Just watched her on the news and she sounded more Ballsy (apart from NF – oops unfortunate initials there Nige) than I have heard in a long time

        • She’s sounded like a pain in the proverbial.

          • Dreadnaught

            No Jack that’s the splinter in your fence you are feeling.

          • You’re showing a sharp wit today, Dreadnaught. On the cider early?

          • Dreadnaught

            Pissin down all day – not good for sailing. Haven’t touched the DD for over nine years now.

          • Well done, Sir.

          • Dreadnaught

            🙂

          • dannybhoy

            DD? Double Diamond?

          • Inspector General

            demon drink

          • Takes a drinker to know this. Jack hasn’t had a drop since October 2015, nor a cigarette.

          • Inspector General

            The Inspector has seen drink wreck people. As for himself, he is not an alcoholic, but nevertheless cannot envisage life without a pint. Bottom line that…

          • A pint ?! Of whiskey?

          • Royinsouthwest

            Or even whisky? I suspect that the Inspector is partial to Scotch.

          • Bet he prefers Irish – with the E.

          • Hi Happy Jack

            Saffron tea is something I’ve taken to drinking,very medicinal apparently.

          • Offsets blindness, allegedly. Jack enjoys the odd cup of ginger tea.

          • Hi

            Also allegedly good for cancer, heart diseases, depression and anxiety….

          • Dreadnaught

            Haven’t they abandoned that?

          • dannybhoy

            I think they have and it’s a beer not a cider, but I can’t think of a cider called DD.
            Unless cos has inside knowledge. Mo-o=oove over, Dredders!

          • Pubcrawler

            Double Diamond still exists.

          • chiefofsinners

            Doc’s Draft (brewed in New York). Incider knowledge.

          • Uncle Brian

            Incider knowledge.
            Oooohhh. That was painful.

          • dannybhoy

            That’s just so clever. Words fale me..

          • chiefofsinners

            Doris Day. Dredders hasn’t touched her since the court case.

          • dannybhoy

            (Chuckles)

      • Anton

        The little people who have been carefully marginalised and denied a voice for many years have spoken, and we shall not be silent until Brexit is enacted.

        • dannybhoy

          Stand up you little people!
          Oh, you are.

      • IanCad

        That is exactly why the Americans have their Second Amendment. If we had it our politicians would think twice before reneging on Brexit.
        Civil unrest – unless backed up by a real and credible threat of force will cut little ice.

  • chiefofsinners

    Establishment stitch up… democratic deficit…
    We could soon find that the leaders of neither main party has been elected by the party, merely chosen by the MPs.
    However, let us reflect on something more wholesome:
    Self-sacrifice is the heart of motherhood.

  • chiefofsinners

    Currently on the BBC website the top two most read stories are:
    1. May set to become Prime minister.
    2. What’s the best way to get rid of belly fat?

    Modern Britain in a nutshell.

    • Inspector General

      Modern life in a nut shell is more ‘how to get rid of belly fat in 24 hours without it affecting my gluttonous exercise poor lifestyle which I have no intention of changing. Where’s the pill to do this’

      • chiefofsinners

        A cri de coeur from the IG.

        • Inspector General

          If you want to piss yourself laughing at intelligent men’s wisdom, team up with Jack. He’s rather good at it. Better than you are…

          • chiefofsinners

            Some of us are able to laugh and remain continent.

          • Inspector General

            Such indignation. Good show!

            Young puppy that you are, you don’t mind if the Inspector rubs your nose in your own shit from time to time. It’s character building, so they say…

          • chiefofsinners

            No problem. I crap excellence.

          • Inspector General

            Sir, your crapping abilities are not in dispute…

          • chiefofsinners

            No, only your continence.

          • Inspector General

            The Inspector is somewhat fond of you. You are a smart arse with promise. And finesse will come to you, of that be assured. But not yet, unfortunately…

          • chiefofsinners

            And fines will come to you. Soon, if not already.

          • Inspector General

            Defiant to the end! Ah, the thumping energy of it all. We are both truly alive this evening, are we not? The Inspector would not have it any other way.

            Now, kindly piss off somewhere else while the Inspector concludes his business with this site tonight…

          • chiefofsinners

            Night, night dad.

          • Inspector General

            That’s my boy! Sweet dreams tiger…x

          • dannybhoy

            You’re getting very ratty of late IG.
            Piles playing up?

      • Uncle Brian

        Where’s the pill to do this’
        When you find out, you’ll let us know, won’t you!

        • Anton

          Sirtfood diet.

  • bluedog

    Well, Your Grace, so much for Michael Gove. If he hadn’t knifed Boris and if the pair of them had maintained a unity ticket, Brexit would be well on the way to becoming a fact. As it is, Andrea Leadsom was clearly too decent a person to tolerate the vituperation thrown at her, and potentially her family, and has capitulated to the powers that be.

    One can almost hear Cameron purring. We will get Remain but be told that it is Brexit.

    Is that a peal of bells one hears too?

    • chiefofsinners

      The thing about May is she is widely known to be Eurosceptic. It was only ambition that kept her in the remain camp. Thus she appeals to many MPs for many reasons, but most of all for being an oily, unprincipled chameleon. The consummate politician. Like Mrs T, she is the best man for the job.

      • bluedog

        But M/s T is unelectable. It’s a matter of judgement, but despite her appointment as PM, there is no prospect that Mrs May could ever be considered as likely to win her own mandate as PM. Lacks the empathy; no salesmanship skills. Time will tell.

        • chiefofsinners

          Was referring to Mrs Thatcher. Who are you thinking of?

          • bluedog

            Mrs Thatcher.

          • chiefofsinners

            Why unelectable? Apart from being dead, of course.

          • bluedog

            Have edited post to remove ambiguity.

        • CliveM

          Who’s the opposition? Corbyn and Farron, with beneficial boundary changes coming up. I think she’d stand a chance.

          Even if it’s Eagle.

  • Anna055

    Two interesting comments on the live feed from the BBC http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/live/uk-politics-36570120

    On Andrea Leadsom:
    A recording by Heather Wheeler posted at 14.52 on the live feed: She says that with Andrea Leadsom “what you see is what you get”

    On Theresa May:
    Another post on the live feed (at14:26) with quotes from Culture Minister Ed Vaizey: ‘As for Theresa May, Mr Vaizey – who backed Michael Gove for leader – predicts she will appeal to voters because “what you see is what you get”.
    He adds: “She doesn’t do back room deals, doesn’t plot. She’s not got into the sort of Machiavellian approach to politics.”

    Just interested that the same phrase is used to describe both women – and Ed Vaizey wasn’t even a Mrs May backer. I find this quite hopeful.

    • Uncle Brian

      Imagine a politician suddenly has a microphone thrust in his face and is asked for his reaction to the news about some other politician who he doesn’t want to offend, but he can’t think of anything specific, on the spur of the moment, to give her or him credit for. “I thought she handled the gold price crisis very effectively” or “Children are much better looked after nowadays, thanks to his single-handed effort” – anything along those lines would be very nice, but you’ve only got a split second to come out with your considered opinion, and there simply isn’t anything of that kind to say that wouldn’t be an obvious lie. So what you do? You pick a stock phrase off the shelf, the closest one to hand: “With So-and-so, what you see is what you get.”

      • Anna055

        I take your point, but I think that being put on the spot is more likely to mean that we hear someone’s genuine opinion……even if it does come out in stock phrases!

  • npbinni

    The media will never treat biblical Christians fairly. Many in the media are theophobic atheists or agnostics. I know, an oxymoron! But isn’t it the truth?

  • Shadrach Fire

    God bless Andrea Leadsom. Assassinated by the Times. May she be given a position she deserves and may the times be ostracised.

    • There’s a story going around that May’s camp deliberately set her up for the Times interview knowing she’d walk into the trap. Apparently, May talked about the pain her childlessness last week anticipating these questions to Leadsom.

    • magnolia

      I think that “The Times” clearly has too many men who fail to appreciate all that their mothers did for them and thus feel it is fine to denigrate that work as if it had not been done nor done using the full intelligence of a hard working person.

      I used to be an avid and faithful Times reader until ten years back when I discovered this the average- and sickening-attitude there. I barely touch the rag now. They are largely out of touch with anything but their own urban, largely London-based, coterie.

  • Time for a General Election.

    • Uncle Brian

      I think you’ll have to wait until May 2020.

      • We’ll see.

        • Uncle Brian

          You have inside information? A tip from the horse’s mouth?

          • Not at all – just getting used to the unexpected in British politics. Let’s face it, there are more MP’s in Parliament opposed to Brexit than in favour of it.

          • Anton

            Yes, if May wavers on Brexit and an election comes about then UKIP will overtake the Tories with ease!

  • bockerglory

    Come on everybody! We’ve all worked for a middle age woman who has had no kids and never will and my experience has been that they are self promoting & arrogant and often rigid thinking and heartless. Actually working for a childless male colleague is painful too. And no I do not feel sorry for the childless as many childless people do adopt or foster or like Anne Widdecombe devote themselves to helping families (or working with children like Mother Theresa – no pun intended).

    Having kids makes you realise that things do not run to plan, demanding your way all the time results in non-co-operation and you have to give if you wish to take. And St Paul did see that church leaders should be family men who have raised good children so that these leaders can empathise and counsel their flocks and the flock can see it is possible to overcome life’s problems with faith, hope & love.

    So actually, yes I do like my leaders to have had a family. Feminists ignore that women like myself are sick and tired of being told that being a woman is not about having children. Wrong! My whole physiology is designed to have and care for children. I do know childless women who work with children and in caring roles which is fine. All that modern feminists want to do is promote macho lesbianism, abortion and promote men who think they are women.

    Personally I would say that being pro #Brexit and having children makes Leadsom a better candidate. Male politicians are always banging on about being a family man. Don’t see why Leadsom should not do the same.

  • Manfarang

    Never mind. It will be diabetes now.

  • PessimisticPurple

    It’s all a media conspiracy, I tells ya, and nuffink too do with Leadsom being out of her depth.

  • Anton
    • IanCad

      Thanks for the link Anton. He has the heart of the matter – and in so few words. The Referendum will change nothing it seems. Independence Day will not be celebrated. There will be no statue of Lord Nigel. The nonentities have circled the wagons. Liberty has lost.

      • bluedog

        What else did you expect? Stunned by the revolt of the masses, the political elites assassinated their champion, Andrea. Note that May will not call an election but will govern until 2020 using Cameron’s mandate. There is nothing more to be done until May goes through the motions of negotiating Brexit.

        The Brexit negotiations will be a process that functions on two levels, the public, and the private. Bear in mind that the EU doesn’t want the UK to leave and the newly emerging leadership of all current British political parties (except UKIP) doesn’t want to leave either, but the British electorate does want to leave. What to do? The solution is to give the British electorate enough of what they want on a basis that can also be used to appease other increasingly fractious electorates, specifically those in France and Germany. Thus, a virtue is made out of necessity.

        Expect that all British negotiators will be Remainians despite assurances to the contrary. Security will be of paramount importance and leaks will not be tolerated. There will be much talking off the record behind closed doors.

        If the betrayal is of the degree that this communicant anticipates, the only solution will be a complete re-ordering of British politics, with new parties evolving to reflect Leave and Remain.

        • Anton

          UKIP already exists. The people denied a voice at last spoke in this Referendum – thanks to Nigel Farage – and Mrs May should take heed that we shall not be quiet again until its result is enacted.

    • Uncle Brian

      Incidentally, in the same speech, she specifically endorsed Anthony Blair’s Iraq War policy, perhaps the single stupidest act in modern politics.

      Well, Chilcot is all over and done with now, isn’t it. Nobody remembers that any more. It’s been swept away in the mud, along with Andrea Leadsom and Michael Gove. Btw, “Anthony” Blair is a name you don’t often see. Is that what Peter Hitchens always calls him? What happened to the Lynton?