Democracy

Speaker Bercow’s Trump ban is political, but his wig abolition is a greater contempt

You don’t have to be fan of Donald Trump not to feel a certain disquiet at the summary proclamation of Speaker Bercow that the President of the United States will not be invited to address the Houses of Parliament when he makes his state visit to the UK later this year. Such an invitation would not need to have been accommodated in the historic Westminster Hall, with which President Obama was honoured: it could easily have been held in the Royal Gallery, which was deemed sufficiently prestigious for President Reagan. But the fact that John Bercow has ruled both out (without, it appears, having the courtesy to consult the Speaker of the House of Lords), is not only discourteous, but acutely and inappropriately political, for the Office of the First Commoner is supposed to be faultlessly neutral and impeccably apolitical.

An invitation to make a state visit is made at the behest of the monarch. It is by no means mandatory or expected for a visiting head of state to address the joint Houses of Parliament, but precedent, protocol, diplomacy and realpolitik must combine in the national interest. It is why Speaker Bercow has been content in the past to welcome those renowned advocates of equality, liberty and human rights the Emir of Kuwait, Sheikh Sabah Al-Ahmad Al-Jaber Al-Sabah, President Xi Jinping of China, President Susilo Yudhoyono of Indonesia and President Tony Tan Keng Yam of Singapore. There are many others, but Speaker Bercow has personally extended the gift of hospitality and heaped praise upon these four renowned advocates of sex equality, racial plurality, equality under the law, an independent judiciary and the rights of refugees. These heads of state clearly earned their honour to address the UK Parliament.

But according to John Bercow, President Trump is racist and sexist. Further, he has instituted a “migrant ban”; eschews equality under the law, and has no respect for the judiciary:

So President Trump has manifestly not earned the honour to address the joint Houses of Parliament.

Presumably, Speaker Bercow can overlook the Emir of Kuwait’s sexism and homophobia; and President Yudhoyono persecution of religious minorities; and President Tan’s homophobia; and President Xi Jinping’s complicity in torture, arbitrary detention, repression of racial and religious minorities, abuse of workers, the persecution of supporters of democracy, and the total state control of all media.

He clearly made his gushing speeches and fawning genuflections out of a courteous combination of precedent, protocol, diplomacy and realpolitik. But Trump’s sexism and racism are far beyond the sexism, racism, homophobia (and let’s not mention anti-Semitism) of the Emir of Kuwait and presidents of China, Indonesia and Singapore. Does Speaker Bercow really bleed more for American women and Syrian refugees than Kuwaiti gays and Chinese Christians? Okay, Chinese Christians, yes, he does. But he has made a very great deal of his advocacy for fundamental LGBT equality, to the point of incorporating rainbow colours and pink triangles into his coat of arms. ‘All are Equal’, his motto declares to the world. Unless, presumably, they are brash and American rather than robed and Kuwaiti, and then LGBT equality can go down the toilet of spineless bootlicking.

Talking of flushing things down the toilet, Speaker Bercow has also decided that the Commons’ clerks will no longer have to wear wigs. They are “too itchy”, apparently, which, as Jacob Rees-Mogg astutely observes, must have been the case for the past three centuries. So, along with the Speaker’s wig, breeches and buckled shoes, they are to be consigned to the dustbin of antique formality. Curiously, the clerks must continue to wear gowns, despite them being too hot. And we must be thankful that the Queen will continue to wear her crown, despite it being too heavy.

Too itchy? Is it just coincidence that a crawly Speaker who hypocritically politicises the Office and basks in the (unparliamentary) applause of the combined ‘progressive’ forces of Labour and the SNP has so little time for custom, so little respect for tradition, and so little intuition for the fruits of democracy?

  • Maalaistollo

    It would be disrespectful to describe the speaker as a little jerk, so I shall refrain from so doing. However, along with many on the liberal-left, he appears to fear that his time is coming to an end, so is seeking to do as much damage as possible before he and his like are swept away.

    • Royinsouthwest

      You are right. “Little jerk” would be offensive to short people!

    • morbidfascination

      Has he earned your respect, then?

  • When the time comes, perhaps the US embassy should hire somewhere like the Albert Hall or O2 Arena and stage a “not to be missed event” whilst ensuring that Bercow and his supporters are excluded.

    • Maalaistollo

      And by then the Donald might have gained some useful experience in the draining of swamps. Petty he won’t have the opportunity to address ours directly, but he might still be able to offer some useful advice.

      • Merchantman

        Precisely. I for one would hugely enjoy a Trump masterclass in upsetting the PC nonentities at Westminster Hall. The professor of anti-political correctness.

  • Busy Mum

    Sorry to be so very unintellectual but I only have to look at that man and feel an intense hatred arising in my heart. His presence in the House is enough to bring a curse upon it.

  • Royinsouthwest

    Can anyone think of examples of political correctness that are not associated with hypocrisy? Finding the first without the second seems about as likely as finding a magnet with a north pole but no south pole.

    • Anton

      div B = 0.

  • Dreadnaught

    basques in the (unparliamentary) applause of… ?

    What Mr Speaker choses to wear under his day attire is his own affair.

    • Corrected. Bless you. Separatism on the brain.

  • Jill

    Ugh! Odious little man. He should be made to wear a hair shirt for a while to teach him some humility.

    • Anton

      Just give him a good wigging.

  • ecclesiaman

    If he does leave his position as speaker it will be a blot on his record to have been so prejudiced and bigoted. It says more about him than Mr Trump.

  • To understand Bercow’s hostility to President Trump, in contrast to his welcome for Obama and assorted Third World leaders, consider this statement written by the Jews who founded The Jewish Alternative:

    Jews in the West are overwhelmingly anti-white in their political attitudes, even if this is not their explicit intention. Generally, they support ‘diversity’, mass immigration, and liberal racial policies like affirmative action that work against the interests of the founding majorities in their host countries: namely, whites.

    In Trump, Bercow sees a leader who may not toe the line on immigration, diversity and multiculturalism, as all other Western leaders have done for half a century. In plain words, a leader who is pro-white and pro-Christian.

    Bercow is right to be nervous of Trump’s intentions. The president’s senior adviser is Stephen Bannon, of whom Mrs Bannon said during their divorce proceedings: ‘he doesn’t like Jews and…he doesn’t like the way they raise their kids to be “whiny brats.”’ Ten years ago, Bannon proposed a documentary on the theme of the threat to the US being broader than Muslim extremists. Among the ‘enablers’ of jihad, Bannon would have named the ‘American Jewish Community’; see also ‘Why Jews Welcome Muslims’ by the Jewish convert to Christianity, Lawrence Auster.

    • 1642+5thMonarchy

      Given that Mr Trump’s daughter is a Jewish convert and his son-in-law (reputed to be his closest adviser) is Jewish, and that Mr Bannon worked for Andrew Breitbart (himself Jewish) and employed many Jews at Breitbart (including Milo Yiannopolis), you will need to dig up more evidence to accuse him (or in your case I suspect, express hope) that he is a raging anti-Semite.

      He is rather a very conservative Christian (personally RC) who clearly has a broader vision of an epic struggle between Judaeo-Christian civilisation and the forces of darkness. It’s a vision I have shared for many years now and only the most purblind cannot or will not see what is happening. Equally I am sure he would perceive neo-nazism as yet another manifestation of the darkness, fortunately one that is for now a minute factor in the battles now ahead.

      • @ 1642+5thMonarchy—
        ● A relatively minor point but Ivanka Trump’s conversion has not found favour with rabbinical authorities.
        ● It is Jews who call Mr Bannon a ‘raging anti-Semite’; see the Tweets in the article I linked earlier.
        ● Mr Bannon’s close contact with Jews may well have influenced his opinion of them.
        ● Yori Yanover wrote in 2013: ‘To insist that we [Jews] have some kind of bond with religious Christians because of similar core values, is to propagate a terrible lie.’ When Jews and Christians cannot even agree on the pretty basic issue of whether Jesus is in Heaven or immersed in boiling excrement in Hell, who would give tuppence for ‘Judæo-Christian’?

        • 1642+5thMonarchy

          The answer is of course ‘some Jews’ but not all or even a majority of ‘Jews’, just as you can find declared ‘Christians’ supporting every idea from extreme left to extreme right.

          Making a general classification form a specific case or two is a classic sign of an ideology, usually extreme. It’s why I’m a conservative – people do not readily fit ideological categories.

          • Hi

            Ashkenazi Chief Rabbi David Lau actually said there was nothing wrong with Ivanka’s Rabbi or her conversion. There was a rejection of another convert (by another set of Rabbis: the Israeli Rabbincate is Byzantine personified ) and this caused a storm in Israel . The establishment had to back down.

            As for Jesus in the Talmud and those apparently nasty things said,they were often used as a pretext by the church to persecute Jews (often by Jewish converts to Christianity, as there’s nothing like the zeal of the converted ).

            Sometimes they’d rather ridiculously put the Talmud on trial or force Jews into one sided debates about the oral law, Jesus and the Talmud then declare themselves the winners, even if they lost, followed by a pogrom ( hence why Jews are reluctant to discuss these things with Christians).

            At one of the more famous ones, the Disputation of Barcelona , even the king of Spain admitted Rabbi Nahmanides, who like most Rabbis on this only had the Torah and his debating skills to defend himself , had won with the award of 300 gold coins. Predictably the Dominicans claimed they’d won.

            Rabbi Gil Student in a website dedicated to this theme has painstakingly gone through each line of the alleged passages in the Talmud and shows that it wasn’t referring to Jesus at .

          • 1642+5thMonarchy

            Not a problem for me Hannah. The truth is that some declared Christians hate Jews (wrongly) and that some declared Jews hate Christians (met some and again they are wrong). The history of Christian persecution is well known, but the reverse is less so, such as the Jewish Arabian kingdom of Himyar’s persecution and massacres of Christian Arabs in the 6th century and leading Jews in Moorish Spain urging the Islamic rulers to persecute and drive out the Christian natives. Time we all grew out of it and Jews accepted that a strong Christian West is their best guarantee of security, both in Israel and elsewhere. People like Soros and others simply stoke old hatreds.

          • Hi 1642

            No problem for me either. And unfortunately my missive was aimed at Johnny, sadly I didn’t post it properly…. But anyways…

          • IrishNeanderthal

            Hello again Hannah.

            I see some above has mentioned Steve Bannon, apropos of whom I feel it necessary to issue something of a warning. Someone from one of the “Trump’s Seven” countries drew my attention to an article in the Guardian about Steve Bannon, whom Trump has recently appointed as his chief strategist or whatever. I looked up his Wikipedia Biography, and his capacity for myth-making reminds me of the last two paragraphs of an essay About Loving Germans by G.K.Chesterton. (You probably won’t like his very Catholic viewpoint, but his logic was spot-on.)

            Regarding the Guardian article, quoting that newspaper feels like a Hindu might feel having to quote from the Qur’an, but here’s the link: First on the White House agenda – the collapse of the global order. Next, war? by Jonathan Freedland.

          • Hi

            I remember the guardian liking the Trump election to the fall of Rome…

        • I’d suggest reading or listening to what Ben Shapiro says about Bannon being anti-Semitic. Shapiro, a conservative Jew who worked under Bannon at Breitbart for a time, says that he strongly dislikes Bannon, one of the reasons he left Breitbart, but that he was convinced that Bannon is not an anti-Semite.

          • @ Phil Taylor—The trouble with ‘anti-Semite’ is that it doesn’t distinguish between unthinking hatred of Jews and the natural response to the anti-Christian and anti-white prejudices of Jews: limiting the amount of harm Jews can do to the West. That would inevitably mean some form of discrimination against Jews, which they would decry as anti-Semitism, but it would, of course, be perfectly justified anti-Semitism. If Stephen Bannon is not anti-Semitic, in the good sense of the term, I would be very surprised.

      • Little Black Censored

        Milo for Speaker?

    • dannybhoy

      Lawrence Auster points out..
      “The real object of Jewish fears-
      First of all, as crazy as it may sound, there is something that many American Jews fear in their heart of hearts even more than they fear Moslem anti-Semitism, and that is white Christian anti-Semitism. Steinlight himself pointed to this phenomenon at a recent panel discussion hosted by the Center for Immigration Studies:”
      Jewish people in Europe and America support immigration because (I think) because as they see it it deflects and dilutes attention to themselves as the original non Christian immigrants.

      • @ dannybhoy—Auster agrees with you but he then asks, four paragraphs further on, why Jews should want a ‘racially diversified, de-Christianized America’ when American Christians ‘are in fact the Jews’ best friends in the world’. His answer is that Jews are haunted by the fear ‘of what they think the goyim might one day do to them [his emphasis]’, a reference to the Jewish perception of white anti-Semitism.

        Gilad Atzmon, who describes himself as an ex-Jew, quotes some early Zionists in this article, among them Ben Frommer who wrote in 1935, ‘The fact is undeniable that the Jews collectively are unhealthy and neurotic.’ Atzmon himself talks of the Jews’ Pre-Traumatic Stress Disorder. It may be that living in the West has been damaging to Jews. In fact, as Atzmon writes, the early Zionists were convinced that the establishment of a Jewish state ‘would heal the Jews of their symptoms.’ Once they had moved to Israel, of course.

        • dannybhoy

          I read that already. From my own observations I would say that Jewish people still tend to see themselves as outsiders and fear persecution . Understandable, but you also miss out that the vast majority of nominal or cultural Jews are loyal and productive citizens.It seems to me that you always seek to prove that the Jews are a problem, a danger and that you look for material to back up your bias.

          • @ dannybhoy—President Truman begs to differ:

            ‘The Jews, I find, are very, very selfish. They care not how many Estonians, Latvians, Finns, Poles, Yugoslavs or Greeks get murdered or mistreated as DP’s [displaced persons] as long as the Jews get special treatment. Yet when they have power, physical, financial or political neither Hitler nor Stalin has anything on them for cruelty or mistreatment to the underdog.’—The Jewish Press

          • dannybhoy

            Absolute rubbish. I lived on kibbutz where there were Jews from Russia, Poland, Czechoslovakia, Germany, Ukraine. Most were extremely kind to me. I never experienced any of this evil stuff you dredge up; and you know why you seek it out?
            It’s because you’ve already made up your mind not to like them.
            You come up with some interesting stuff when you’re not on a rant. It’s a great shame because it stops people liking you.
            Makes you kind of an outsider, an outcast; someone that decent people point the finger at and shudder..

          • @ dannybhoy—I never experienced any of this evil stuff you dredge up
            Well, no. You haven’t been a war president, you didn’t witness the Great Terror or the Nakba. Dismissing events because you did not experience them is bound to limit your understanding of the world.

            someone that decent people point the finger at and shudder
            Decent people do not point their fingers. It’s bad manners.

          • dannybhoy

            “You haven’t been a war president, you didn’t witness the Great Terror or the Nakba. Dismissing events because you did not experience them is bound to limit your understanding of the world.”
            Partly true, but then presumably you have, and that is why you can speak with greater authority.
            Can’t wait to read the books. Are you doing a book signing?

          • @ dannybhoy—I do not claim to be an authority on any subject, which is why my comments often quote others who can lay claim to authority. My comments on Jews are full of quotes, the vast majority from Jews themselves, the ultimate authorities on Jewry.

            I lived in Saudi Arabia for five years and met many Muslims. Like your memories of Israel, my memories of those times are very happy but they do not influence my judgment that Islam is bad for the West, and I think Christians would do well to base their assessment of Jews on more than personal experiences, especially given Jewry’s longstanding hostility to Christianity.

          • dannybhoy

            I shall get back to you later on this. A severe cold over the last week has rather knocked the stuffing out of me. I would like to feel more energised before returning to the fray.
            I say ‘fray’ because your antipathy towards Jewish people and their leaders is both selective and irrational; especially if you are a practicing Christian.
            Anyway for the time being,
            Sniff!

          • @ dannybhoy—I’m sorry to hear you’re not in the rudest of rude. I’m no longer a believing Christian but I like to think that I’m still guided by the Christian principles drummed into me as a child. A swift recovery.

          • dannybhoy

            “I’m sorry to hear you’re not in the rudest of rude. I’m no longer a believing Christian but I like to think that I’m still guided by the Christian principles drummed into me as a child. A swift recovery.”
            That’s very kind of you. thank you. I’m a COPDer, and had pneumonia years ago. so anything like a cold or chest infection knocks me flat..
            We shall look at this bias together, and if you are willing to explain a little about how you lost your faith that would be very interesting.

  • David

    Cranmer’s excellent article hits all the nails squarely on their heads.
    This sickening virtue signalling writ large is grossly hypocritical.
    The man is a disgrace to his office. He is there to serve the UK public not his own twisted, hypocritical obsessions.
    Mrs May must send him packing.

    • Anton

      Can she? Anybody know how to dump a Speaker?

      • CliveM

        She can’t, Parliament can. If he was unwilling to stand down, it would need a vote to remove him.

        I think you can see the problem she will have.

        • David

          Thanks for clarifying. Parliament picked the wrong one there.

          • CliveM

            Deliberately. By custom it was time for a Conservative speaker, Labour selected the most odious little toad they coul Find on the Conservative benches to piss them off.

            You can see why he still looks to Labour for support.

            It’s an Honourable post. I’m note entirely certain he is an ornament to it.

          • Anton

            Francis Urquhart would know what to do. Let’s hope Theresa May can match him.

          • CliveM

            Let’s hope so, but she is quite busy!

          • David

            Just a tad ! !

          • David

            If that was their motive, it says much about them.

          • CliveM

            Yep. And politicians wonder why they arent respected.

            I seem to remember there was at the time some speculation that he might of been planning to cross the floor.

          • CliveM

            Hey, you’ve changed your post, my first word doesn’t make sense anymore!!!! ☹️ Will amend.

          • David

            ?? Nothing’s changed on my screen ?
            You provided a helpful clarification to my “Mrs May must send him packing”
            and an answer to Anton’s sensible “Can she ? Anybody know how to dump a Speaker ?”

          • CliveM

            Oh I thought you originally said “Thanks for clarifying. Parliament picked the wrong one there.”

            Never mind!!

        • Dominic Stockford

          The Tories and the DUP have had enough of him – as have several other individuals. A secret ballot would have him out in a jiffy.

  • CliveM

    So we now have the Speaker, abusing his office, to indulge in a little bit of virtue signalling, jeopardising HM Governments foreign policy.

    • Dreadnaught

      It’s a clear breach of the non-political position demanded from the role as Speaker.

      • CliveM

        Yep, but this Speaker has frequently not been neutral.

        He’s a disgrace.

  • Albert

    Trump is horrible. But Obama believed in so-called partial birth abortion. Why didn’t people call for him to be banned?

    • dannybhoy

      Really, Trump is terrible? In what way is he different from some of the presidents that went before him?
      Remember the Kennedy brothers and their womanizing and adultery? Or the Clintons with their Foundation of Dodgy Dealings and pay per visit policy?
      Want to influence American policy in your part of the world?
      Sure, but it’ll cost ya….
      The difference with Trump is not that he’s terrible but that we all know about him. He’s bombastic and quick off the lip, but he’s his own man and he didn’t need financial support to fund his campaign, so no favours to pay back.
      He hasn’t said anything that doesn’t make sense, he just needs to prepare his policies and explain them a little more before rolling them out..

      • 1642+5thMonarchy

        Yep, most of the criticism is sheer snobbery, just it is of Mr Farage, and of course of both leaders’ supporters (mere plebs who ought to know their place).

        • dannybhoy

          “Donald Trump shattered expectations on Tuesday with an election night victory that revealed deep anti-establishment anger among American voters and set the world on a journey into the political unknown.”
          https://www.theguardian.com/us-news/2016/nov/09/donald-trump-wins-us-election-news
          He secured 279 electoral college votes against Hilary Clinton’s 228..
          When berks like Bercow make these pronouncements they insult millions of American people who voted for him by and large admire us Brits.
          It might appeal to those self important saps in the Westminster bubble, but frankly America could sell our country at one end of the street and buy it back at the other.
          Do they need us?
          Not really..
          Do we need them?
          You betcha!

      • CliveM

        Your defence seems to say “yes he’s terrible, but so were others “. We could defend Bercow the same way, “yes he’s terrible, but look at his predecessor”.

        It doesn’t really wash does it?

        • dannybhoy

          No, not at all. Trump was democratically elected, even though a lot of the nasty stuff was already in the public arena, whereas the speaker is elected by the House of Commons.
          Remember this..?
          http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/newstopics/mps-expenses/10761548/MPs-expenses-A-scandal-that-will-not-die.html
          And this..?
          “Shaming of the 389 greedy MPs who went too far”
          http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-1248648/MP-expenses-Shaming-389-greedy-politicians-went-far.html

          What I’m pointing out is the sheer hypocrisy involved and it ill behooves people who haven’t exactly covered themselves in glory to ban an American president, especially when we’ve decided to come out of Europe and we are going to ned as many good trade deals as we can secure.

          • CliveM

            DB

            Behaviour is either right or it is wrong. Being democratically elected doesn’t change that.

            Even with the hope of good trade deals!!

          • dannybhoy

            Yes my innocent, I agree, but you don’t get far in politics by being a choir boy. You have to want power, and you have to be ruthless..

          • CliveM

            I have little problem with ruthless politicians. That’s not my issue.

          • dannybhoy

            Your issue is what you see as my ‘whataboutery’, but I’m somewhat of a pragmatist when it comes to politics, and ruthlessness is often accompanied by dishonesty and shady dealings.

          • CliveM

            So Trump is indeed a terrible man, but average for a politician?

      • Albert

        You cannot move from “Trump is terrible” to “other presidents were not terrible.” Hence my comment about Obama. He was terrible too – worse IMO.

        • dannybhoy

          ?
          Translation please.

          • Albert

            I mean I agree with you. Trump may be bad, but others were bad too.

          • dannybhoy

            I’d have been perfectly happy with ” I agree with you.” Albert.. ;0)

          • Albert

            Sorry on first reading I misread what you said and thought we disagreed.

          • dannybhoy

            You’n me disagree?!
            Not recently mon ami…

    • Dominic Stockford

      Clinton supports it, but you wouldn’t have known in the election campaign as the MSM covered it.

      • Albert

        It’s amazing really. Very few people would think so-called partial birth abortion is morally acceptable. Most would regard it as callous murder. But because Obama and Clinton are willing to say nice things about a few choice liberal topics, their Herodian tenancies are ignored. How gullible people are. I wonder if Obama and Clinton actually laugh at their supporters.

    • carl jacobs

      Because partial birth abortion isn’t terrible to the cultural Left. It is a necessary protection of human autonomy.

      • Albert

        Quite. It’s extraordinary how the dogma of freedom is really just the dogma of selfishness turned into some kind of virtue.

  • carl jacobs

    This is an insult to the Office of the President and not to Trump. It’s exactly the kind of thing that can get an ordinary American’s back up. Not wise. I suspect the Prime Minister will fix it.

    Why China and not the US? Because of the fear of insulting China. And because this man is playing to the applause of the crowd.

    • Dreadnaught

      Totally agree. This is completey out of Order; Order.

    • IanCad

      Couldn’t agree with you any more Carl. You Americans are a patient lot and your toleration is taken for weakness by the pansies over here. This had better be sorted right now! I’ve said it before – it is foolish and dangerous to underestimate Americans. Uncle Sam is equal to two John Bulls, and you all celebrate the 4th July and remember the fact that you had to come to our rescue twice in the last century.

      • Dreadnaught

        I think the American public and media are themselves, not doing the global position of President any favours by the rabid protestations against their man in the Whitehouse.

        • 1642+5thMonarchy

          Yes the same tendency is raging through the streets of the larger US conurbations, virtue signalling at awards events and yammering across the established US print and broadcast media. Our little cuckolded pipsqueak of Speaker, who is heartily loathed by most MPs of his own party and loved by such titans of integrity such as Keith Vaz, is hardly going to up the ante much further for the new President (I love writing and saying that).

          • Anton

            On a different subject, if you’d like my essay on science and scripture then drop an email to the contact person on that flyer, who is a friend and a reader of this blog; then I can email it to you. (FYI the only other person who knows is Pubcrawler, whom I know personally and who actually identified you; I only got as far as the brewery.)

          • 1642+5thMonarchy

            Thanks Anton. I can’t make the meeting given it’s the other side of the country and timings etc but would love a copy of the essay. Could you post a hard copy to the brewery for me please as I no longer have the flyer as it got lost by accident?

          • Anton

            Yes!

        • dannybhoy

          But that’s their business surely?

    • Merchantman

      If he was called to speak President Trump could end by saying. ‘Thank you Mr Speaker, you’re Fired!’

    • Mrs Proudie of Barchester

      Bercow does not speak for the British people, dear Carl….he is married to a Lefty harpy and does what she tells him…not that you would catch me doing that to the bishop….ahem!

  • Inspector General

    The lack of statesmanship missing in Bercow is enough to make a fellow weep. But then, we need Bercows to push populism and Brexit through. The people are angry, and Mr Speaker is doing his bit to keep them like that…

    • Good point, Inspector. The spectacular melt-downs on both sides of the Atlantic Puddle are a joy to watch and chortle over as well.

      • Inspector General

        Rather!

  • Mrs Proudie of Barchester

    Ghastly man and a disgrace to the office he holds. The last Speaker was bad enough, but this one takes the biscuit (not one of my hobnobs I can assure you!). He seems to forget that Parliament is the nation assembled, and that in matters like this, recognising opinion is at the very least divided on the matter, he should have adopted traditional neutrality. But then, as the wig (and earlier robe) incident testifes, Mr. Speaker is to tradition what Mr. Balls is to ballroom dancing.

  • Dreadnaught

    Will someone with public standing please start an on-line petition to have the matter of Mr Speaker to withdraw his remarks debated in Parliament?

    • dannybhoy

      The man is a disgrace and an embarrassment to our nation. He has no right to make a unilateral declaration like this. In fact I shall be telling my American contacts that Mr Trump should put off the intended state visit to the UK indefinitely.
      Plus the goodwill trade deal..
      That way the Queen won’t be embarrassed by his presence..
      Our parliamentary democracy won’t have to listen to any gauche or bombastic speeches by a democratically elected American president…
      And we can all wallow in our pomposity and self righteousness.
      Seriously.
      It’s what I would do if I were him.
      Bercow and all those braying donkeys in Parliament have deliberately insulted the President of the most powerful nation and guarantor of freedom in the Western world.
      So, trip’s off guys. Forget the trade deal..and suck that up UK..
      (How long do you suppose before we’re crawling back on our hands and knees?)
      I’m seriously ashamed.

    • David

      They have !
      The link is above with William Lewis, two hours earlier than you.

      • Dreadnaught

        I signed it as soon as I saw it.

    • dannybhoy

      Yeah, sign it Dreadders. You’ve been kicking up the most fuss …

      • Dreadnaught

        I have.

        • dannybhoy

          Took a bit of prodding though di’n’t it…

          • Dreadnaught

            I signed it as soon as I saw it – don’t understand what you are on about. I also sent the link to the Daily Mail. No one prodded me at any time as far as I know.

          • dannybhoy

            (Sigh)
            It was a leg pull. a gentle josh..

          • Dreadnaught

            Doh! – bit slow this morning 🙂

          • dannybhoy

            And you a former military man…
            Have you been watching that Special Forces Ultimate Hell week prog on BBC2?

          • Dreadnaught

            Have seen it but I have to wonder why it is deemed worthy ‘entertainment’. If those taking part really wanted to put themselves to the test, the should simply sign up and get on with it. I think it rather says more about their egos and be on TV than a desire to serve in the ranks – the real hard way.

          • dannybhoy

            True, and think it is to a degree ego, but then one of the most successful participants is a deaf guy. He just doesn’t give up and said he would have loved to be the real thing but his impairment wouldn’t allow it…

          • Dreadnaught

            Good point. the lad has bottle.

  • TropicalAnglican

    May I point out that President Tony Tan Keng Yam is a devout, practising Anglican Christian. And the presidency is largely ceremonial in nature.

  • Inspector General

    Listening to the BBC Radio news, the Beast of Bolsover is with Bercow. What a pairing…

    Here’s two who can’t quite believe it…

    https://uploads.disquscdn.com/images/7c56e4454d71f570fe1005b21783c7434ebec1669a72bd0358565d7fbc2114c0.gif

  • Ivan M

    It wasn’t the Indonesian President that persecuted minorities. It just happened under his watch. Nothing unusual or unexpected in Indonesia given its size.

  • Let’s hope this episode brings about the demise of this tiresome, loathsome, self-aggrandising little prig. In that way President Trump will be draining our swamp too.

    • Merchantman

      Those are my thoughts exactly particularly the ‘draining the swamp’ phrase.
      While some of us may have serious reservations about parts of President Donald Trump’s character those should not stand in the way of appreciating an office holder, who with a dramatic burst of energy, sets about with plain speaking and determination carrying forward his manifesto promises.
      In this sense at least, Trump is the very model of a Democratic leader and has in two weeks achieved more than many UK Prime Ministers can only dream about in a Parliament or two.
      But it seems your very average Westminster politician just doesn’t get it, and is probably terrified they have been shown up for what they are.

      • David

        Yes they are terrified of achievers and promise keepers.

    • ChaucerChronicle

      Well, well, well if it ain’t Rebel Saint!

      Looks like the old crew hands are coming back. In time for a ‘revival’?

  • Inspector General

    Good grief! It’s Hernandez. The illegal Mexican bandit that stokes the boilers of Inspector Towers…

    “Haven’t seen you since Christmas. What brings you above ground level”

    “Bercow”

    “Even you’ve heard. What should we do about him then”

    “Keel Heem!”

    “Drink, old chap?”

  • John

    The wigs are ridiculous and it is sensible to discard them. Should we expect our foreign ambassadors to walk about wearing ruffs just because Sir Walter Raleigh did?

    • Dominic Stockford

      Uniform worn by those holding office is very important.

      • Anton

        What you say and what you are replying to are not incompatible!

      • John

        Agreed; a suit and tie are perfectly adequate for the role in the twenty-first century.

    • Martin

      John

      Judges wear wigs.

      • Anton

        Quite; how can anybody look at a picture like this and not laugh heartily?

        http://www.economist.com/node/18774658

        • Martin

          Anton

          I was looking at the picture at the top of this blog and thinking how much better Mr Speaker would look in a wig.

          I was recently a Juror in a crown court case and will comment the judge was a lot better dressed than that bunch. Their robes look singularly uninspired, like something a child would draw.

          • Anton

            The pic I posted was actually of Scottish judges not English, but I think English ones are capable of looking every bit as absurd.

            Can’t see you disagreeing if I spoke about episcopal vestments…

      • John

        So did the court of Louis XVI. It was, for some impenetrable reason, à la mode in 18th Century France. Judges just look silly perpetuating a fashion that inexplicably sprang up, and understandably disappeared, hundreds of years ago.

        • Martin

          John

          Curiously I think those in front of Mr Speaker look better than he does. He rather reminds me of a rather inadequate maths teacher.

  • Pubcrawler
  • IanCad

    Completely OT, but who are the two likely lads in their skivvies shown on HG’s twitter log (on the right) and reallio trullio are they associated in any way with Westcott house? Say it isn’t so.

  • William Lewis

    An antidote to the virtue signalling:

    https://petition.parliament.uk/petitions/179113

    • dannybhoy

      Signed it.

    • IanCad

      Done!

    • David

      Signed it !

    • ChaucerChronicle

      Done.

  • Dominic Stockford

    Bercow has to go. Now.

    • dannybhoy

      Just need a quartet of clerks for the backing group and rehearse for Wednesday’s PMQ…

  • Bercow and his wife represent all that is wrong with the British political elite. Their time is surely coming to an end.

    • dannybhoy

      Happy Jack is back!

  • chiaramonti

    He knows no history. Does he not remember the words of Speaker Lenthall to Charles Stuart? “I have neither eyes to see nor tongue to speak in this place but as the House is pleased to direct me, whose servant I am here.” The servant seems to think he is now the master!

    • dannybhoy

      Little men often feel a need to make up for their lack of inches.
      Perhaps that was Sally’s complaint..

      • Q: Why are short people oppressed?
        A: They’re always getting overlooked.

        Sally is very understanding. As a regular treat she brings home a good bottle of wine and a DVD of John’s favourite film – Gulliver’s Travels. When he gets in from work she orders his favourite takeaway which they eat while drinking the wine and watching the firm. Then afterwards Sally goes upstairs and runs him a nice hot sink.

        Poor John was pickpocket recently. How could anyone stoop so low?

        • Anton

          Last to know when it rains?

          • The one lying on the floor, legs akimbo.

          • IanCad

            I’m sorry, but I find taking the mick about anyone’s perceived physical shortcomings is hitting below the belt and is thoroughly undignified.

          • Well, shortcomings, above or below the belt, are regrettable.

          • IanCad

            You don’t miss a trick Jack. I did and used exactly the wrong relative word.
            Think, type, review, copy to word pad, re-read, edit, post, check once posted and edit accordingly.

          • Jack has no idea to what you refer, kind Sir.

          • chefofsinners

            Legs Akimbo was president of Equatorial Guinea, I believe.

        • dannybhoy

          Shoulder shaker that one!

        • chefofsinners

          I bet John he couldn’t reach the two pieces of meat on the table. He refused to bet because the steaks were too high.

          • dannybhoy

            Lol! Keep ’em coming MirthMan..

          • …. and he struggled raising his family because he couldn’t put food on the table.

  • Hi

    1) The decision is hypocritical given the leaders of Kuwait and China have addressed parliament.

    2).This isn’t candidate Trump, but the President of the USA. He’s the head of our most important ally and we need American because of Brexit. We shouldn’t upset

    3). I’m fed up with the left treating this as if American internal politics is an extension of ours, it isn’t. We’re two separate sovereign states. That’s how Trump should be approached i.e. as head of state and government of an allied state.

    4). America’s internal politics and who they elected is up to them. Our politicians aren’t there to be an unofficial opposition. Leave that to Michael Moore.

    5). Bercow is the Speaker and should be , as per convention politically neutral. He’s got the job because Labour gave it to time during the Brown years. But he was always a CINO. Hopefully they’ll get rid of him.

    6). Elect Jacob Rees Mogg Speaker instead.

    • Elect Boris …. that would be a hoot.

    • Martin

      Hannah

      To elect Jacob would be to silence him, please don’t.

      • Martin

        I see someone has suggested the the next one, in turn, should be Labour. May I suggest Diane Abbot, the silence would be palpable.

        • Martin

          I see David Beckham has given up immediate hope of a knighthood. Why do I consider this connected?

      • Hi Martin

        True . Who else do you think?

        • Martin

          Hannah

          I’ve made a suggestion elsewhere, tho’ migraines may be a problem.

    • Jacob would do well in a position of defending and protecting our religion and culture.

  • David

    Dump the Bercow.
    His Office requires impartiality !
    Just send him away with a mirror to gaze into lovingly.

  • Redrose82

    John Bercow is beneath contempt. He attained his high office by getting into bed with the enemies of his own party and has shown scant regard for the even handedness that this office calls for.

    • Mrs Proudie of Barchester

      Surely he gets into bed with the Left, personified by the lovely Mrs. Bercow, a woman who, if she had one more brain cell, would be a potted plant…

      • Redrose82

        A vile, common as muck, horrible woman and, if you’ll pardon the expression dear lady, one not to hob knob with.

      • chefofsinners

        If she had one more brain cell she would have a brain cell.

  • carl jacobs

    This is an attempt by the Left to assert its right to define the acceptable limits of politics.

    • David

      Spot on !

    • Royinsouthwest

      Do the left ever do anything else these days? I can remember a time when they talked about things like unemployment and the nuclear deterrent. Whether or not you agreed with the Left’s views you had to admit that those were very important topics.

  • Cameron, it seems, wasn’t all bad. Back in 2010, he recounted an anecdote in which junior health minister Simon Burns’s driver reversed into the Speaker’s car in a Parliament courtyard. The diminutive Mr Bercow appeared and told Mr Burns: “I’m not happy!” To which Mr Burns replied: “Well, which one [of the seven dwarves] are you?”

    • Politically__Incorrect

      Must be “Sneezy” since things easily get up his nose.

      • Anton

        Do you feel Lucky?

    • chefofsinners

      All of ’em:
      Dopey, Toshful, Sleazy, Snipey, Grumpy, Hippy and Dick.

  • dannybhoy

    Off Topic and important..
    It suddenly occurred to me that it’s probably that time again.
    What time? you may ask.
    Well I’ll tell you.
    Time to dig into those fluff filled pockets and gay sporrans with bits of er, dried porridge in various nooks and crannies, and make a generous offering to keep the blog solvent.. It’s a bind I know but please do give http://archbishopcranmer.com/donate/

    • David

      What am I missing ?
      Is there an appeal for funds ?

      • dannybhoy

        Not an official one David but you’ll see right at the very top on the purple strap it says :Donations. Very easy to overlook. Took ne a while to notice,, The blog needs funds to keep it going so an occasional reminder doesn’t go amiss..

        • David

          Yes. Well done.

  • William Lewis

    It’s people like Bercow the give Trump a good name.

  • Mrs Proudie of Barchester

    Naughty step for you…

  • len

    Bercow is a little man trying to fill a big chair. He failed.

  • Politically__Incorrect

    Bercow, like the BBC, has abandoned any pretence of impartiality. He is not fit for the job. They should show him the door.

    • Pubcrawler

      Door? Cat flap would do.

      • Martin

        PC

        Window?

        • Pubcrawler

          One high up the Victoria Tower, yes. Though his inflated ego might break his fall.

      • Mrs Proudie of Barchester

        Twat flap perchance?

        • chefofsinners

          Preserve your modesty madam! Show no more than an ankle.

          • Mrs Proudie of Barchester

            Oh……………goodness…………….I have just twigged your reference…..naughty man!

          • chefofsinners

            Well, I suppose the gentlemanly thing is to thank you for the offer.

          • carl jacobs

            Might you display a twinge of guilt for encouraging the lesser angels of Jack’s nature? He needs a positive role model.

          • Grouchy Jack

            He’s an inspiration.

          • carl jacobs

            That’s the problem.

          • chefofsinners

            I don’t think we need any more twinges displayed. I’m trying to talk Mrs Proudie out of that sort of behaviour.

          • carl jacobs

            But of course Mrs Proudie – being an upright and virtuous woman – would never have even imagined the inuendo attributed to her.

          • chefofsinners

            Uptight and tortuous? How dare you…?

          • carl jacobs

            You are NEVER going to be allowed off the naughty step.

          • carl jacobs

            tortuous

            So this means “long, difficult, and circuitous” and perhaps even “crooked” which in the context of a weblog means you just said Mrs Proudie uses a lot of extraneous words to make a very indirect point. And maybe for nefarious motives. Not true of her at all of course.

            You are in so much trouble.

          • A pussy-flap. Comparing him to such is an insult to all descent pussies.

          • carl jacobs

            [Shakes head in despair]

          • Pubcrawler

            Are you a connoisseur of flap, Jack? Perhaps Mrs Proudie could satisfy your need for oaty goodness.

          • Carl will on soon ….

          • carl jacobs

            What? Am I finally having a positive influence?

          • …. with crispy bacon, fried eggs and hash browns.

          • carl jacobs

            I can understand your dreams of an American breakfast. It must be terrible to be constantly surrounded with British food.

          • …. almost forgot the side order of black-pudding.
            Have you ever experienced fried Irish soda bread with a slice of bacon and a poached egg? It’s bliss.
            Btw, have now watched the Super Bowl through again and then the 45 minute version that just shows the plays. Must say Jack’s respect for the game has shot up. It was a special match.

          • carl jacobs

            Pudding is a dessert. Why would I eat it for breakfast? There used to be an Irish Restaurant in the Dallas Airport Terminal. I ate breakfast there once. It was OK.

          • A fine delicacy is Black pudding; a type of blood sausage made from pork fat or beef suet, pork blood and a relatively high proportion of oatmeal. Sliced and fried.

            Find a good Irish bar or café and order fried soda bread, with bacon, mushrooms and egg.

          • carl jacobs

            Hard boiled eggs wrapped in a pork sausage breading and fried golden brown.

            This is as close as I could find.

          • That’s a Scotch egg and, frankly, horrible.

          • CliveM

            You can get good quality ones.

          • carl jacobs

            Ah. So it’s British food and not Irish.

          • Carl, there’s English food, Scottish food, Welsh food and Northern Irish food. Then there’s Éire, or, in the English language, Ireland, with it’s own food too.

          • carl jacobs

            So … It’s only the English part of British food that’s terrible?

          • Even within England there are regional variations. You’ll need to define British food” and “terrible”. In Essex, for example, Vindaloo is now considered a local dish.

          • Pubcrawler

            *splutter*

          • William Lewis

            Goodness!!!

        • *blush*

        • Grouchy Jack

          Madam. You’ll awaken Randy Jack.

      • dannybhoy

        Very droll, Not quite as funny as Jack’s though..

        • Pubcrawler

          You can go off people you know… 😛

          (Mine was original, gimme some credit at least. *sob*)

          • dannybhoy

            Sorry, it was a bit ungracious of me. I envy you people whose it is so much sharper than my own…

      • chefofsinners

        Could share it with Jacob Rees-Moggy.

        • Pubcrawler

          Which would Mrs May-owww be most likely to shunt through with her kitten heels*, do you think?

          * Whatever they are.

          • chefofsinners

            Liam Fox being pursued by Jeremy Hunt.

        • wisestreligion

          I hope the front door of No 10 opens for Jacob R-M in the future. We might then have a proper Conservative Government instead of second hand Marxists dutifully implementing policy prescribed by the BBC and the Labour Party.

          • Anton

            Quite; men like David Chameleon.

    • Royinsouthwest

      He would probably walk straight into a job with the BBC! Some ex-politicians make quite good broadcasters, e.g. Michael Portillo but he has the sense to talk about railways – much more interesting than politics. I doubt if Bercow would be so interesting.

  • Martin

    Haven’t we known that Bercow is an ass for a long time? That he remains in office tells us something about the nature of our politicians.

    That Bercow doesn’t like Trump is a step up for Trump.

    • IrishNeanderthal

      A real ass would be better:

      • Martin

        IN

        Now that was a political broadcast worth watching! Perhaps our politicians could take note.

      • Pubcrawler

        You keep coming up with the weirdest stuff. Did you once work for Eurotrash?

    • One ass trying to ride two donkeys.

      • Martin

        HJ

        A horse might be too big.

        • Can’t see him getting his leg over a donkey either. Sally probably has to lift him on.

  • Anna

    It’s shocking to find so many British leaders willing to shoot themselves in the foot – they seem to want post-Brexit Britain to fail, just to prove their point. Thankfully, Theresa May seems sharper than the average MP, and it is a good thing that she, not Boris Johnson, is the PM. Hopefully, she will find a way maintain good relations with the US despite this episode.

    • Anton

      I am informed by American friends that Nigel Farage is maintaining a high media profile there and becoming the Republicans’ favourite Brit. Let’s hope Boris can hit it off with Trump. If not, then, as someone suggested below with glorious mischief, he could always be made the next Speaker.

      • bluedog

        Farage is well past his best before date. While not denying his influence as a catalyst for Brexit, his failure to win an election in the UK parliament and his decision to resign as UKIP leader are surely major turning points in Farage’s career.

        • Pubcrawler

          For one who declared that he wanted his life back he’s doing a pretty poor impression of Cincinnatus, certainly.

  • chefofsinners

    So Mr Barcode (elected unopposed) has decided, unilaterally, that in the name of democracy the democratically elected president of the USA may not come in. This is entirely consistent with Mr Bumcrack’s neutrality, because he is paying no attention to everyone equally.

    • He’s a Hoomonist, dear chap. Respect his sensibilities, do.

  • Murti Bing

    Apologies, but this man is nothing more than a sanctimonious twat. And a hypocrite at that.

    • Lol …. although, to be fair, twats can be useful but alas not weeny-meeny Bercow.

      • Politically__Incorrect

        Bercow useful? Maybe as a door-stop

  • wisestreligion

    “I feel very strongly that our opposition to racism and to sexism and our support for equality…”

    Bercow thus used the Speaker’s Chair as a pulpit to preach his religion of Equality and Identity Politics. I imagine most of those in the pews share his beliefs. He even has gay symbols on his newly granted coat of arms.

    I understand that Ronald Reagan was similarly denied the chance to speak in Westminster Hall in 1982. Perhaps Trump should therefore take Bercow’s exclusion as a peculiar British honour reserved for the best Presidents.

    • dannybhoy

      ” I imagine most of those in the pews share his beliefs”
      Or, more likely, are afraid not to support them..
      Tis my personal belief that there is an awful lot of intimidation and conformity going on these days.. Prisoners of political correctness.

    • Anton

      Why didn’t Reagan, please? That was during Thatcher’s premiership, and George Thomas was Speaker.

    • Royinsouthwest

      Ronald Reagan did make a speech in Parliament in 1982. I think members of both houses were present but I am not sure whether the speech was in the Commons or the Lords. You can see his speech on Youtube.

  • ZZMike

    Wigless? Oh, the horror!

  • not a machine

    Your graces article poses a number of bad thoughts to choose from , however the matt cartoon seems to suffice for me ,whilst it may be in the remit of the chair , given the USA is our closest of allies I would have thought such speaking requires the most considerate spirit ,to our closest allies .he is either undiplomatic or has shown his condem hand , and he must be considering his position which at only a year early isn’t that much of a problem .If he cannot see what his outburst has done to impartial democratic relations between houses and parliament , he is as I have said above .for such a mind to make such a diplomatic error in the high office he holds ,is most odd , had him down as smart…..oh well .
    I was a little concerned with housing ,proposal ,some councils are terrible at building houses ,some are very good in design,living space and material considerations , given some of these could be large projects ,I am not against some more ,” this is what is needed approach” rather than ,um ahhh ,spatial strategy , commitiee has a few problems , If your telling me that we don’t have a designer that can make ,some decent homes ,that yield rents ,that work towards the time when renewal is needed ,then I pity my countries poverty .
    the other problem the bill left out , was sympathetic understanding of the village or town centre , not an easy project I admit , but in some places it mus be becoming painfully obvious , that town centre retail is dying along with town centre retail jobs ,in my view irreparable damage has already occurred, but I doubt that will stop the ordering and drone delivery , uber corp making a few people richer and a lot more poorer , strange isn’t it no labour mp ever critcises these companies do they ….

    • Scottish Calvinist

      “I have neither eyes to see nor tongue to speak in this place but as the House is pleased to direct me, whose servant I am here”. Mr Speaker Lenthall, 1642.

      • Anton

        To which Charles lamely replied “I see my birds have flown.” Let Bercow flee too.

        • Mrs Proudie of Barchester

          Interestingly, Louis XVI’s response, when the Third Estate declared itself the National Assembly and refused to move out of the hall, was something similar. At that point rulers lose it…

          • Pubcrawler

            If it has reached that point, they already have.

  • The itsy-bitsy Bercow
    Climbed on the gravy train
    Down came the pennies
    And amassed the Bercow’s gain

    Out came the scandals
    And dried up all the dosh
    And the itsy-bitsy Barcow
    Was no longer so awash
    The itsy-bitsy Bercow
    Now all frustrated
    Lays down the law
    To give Bercow’s members a boost.

    • chefofsinners

      Hey diddle diddle
      The prat’s on the fiddle
      Bercow’s a jumped up loon
      The little man laughed to stop the Don
      How childish is this tiny buffoon?

      • dannybhoy

        Mehhhhhh…

      • Politically__Incorrect

        There was a man called Bercow
        Whose last name didn’t rhyme with anything
        Still the brave poets laboured with their pen
        From such daunting task did they shirk? No!

        It’ll get my coat…

        • William Lewis

          Oh Bercow, oh berk.
          You signal your virtue.
          And sully the chair.

  • dannybhoy

    You’re about a day late Sarky. Somebody already did that one. I remember Suffolk folk being slow, but not that slow….

    • David

      Suffolk rules !

      • dannybhoy

        Yeah, but not our Sarky..

  • Manfarang

    Who the hell would want to sit and listen to a speech by Donald Trump anyway?

    • carl jacobs

      Well … You have a good point.

      But it’s the principle of the thing.

    • Royinsouthwest

      It would be more entertaining that listening to some politicians!

      • Manfarang

        So bigly.

    • None of the above

      Oh, he’s no orator, for sure.
      But then Obama was an orator (at least so long as the autocue was working).
      From which some of us may conclude that rhetorical facility isn’t necessarily all it’s cranked up to be.

      • Manfarang

        Addressing both Houses of Parliament is an honour usually given to great statesmen (and women). Donald is new to the job and he has yet to prove himself.

      • 1642+5thMonarchy

        Obama was a rubbish Speaker: stilted, non genuine, usually sounded bored in what he was saying.

    • IanCad

      Maybe those automobile workers whose jobs were shipped to Mexico. Perhaps a few of the legions displaced IT employees, victims of the fraudulent H1-B visa scam. Not only did they lose their livelihoods, they were made to train their replacements.
      Let’s not forget those black folk residing in the slums of most US cities. They would surely listen to Trump offering some means of exit from their degradation.
      How about those who are concerned over the question of religious liberty? Trump offered absolute assurance that in the land of the free the greatest liberty of all will be honoured and continued.
      Many, many people want to listen to Trump’s speeches.

      • 1642+5thMonarchy

        Well said. As the Don keeps saying, he’s governing for the forgotten. The coastal snobbish rich didn’t give a damn for anyone else.

      • Manfarang

        None of whom live in London. I know another businessman who became a leader saying he would make everyone rich. Things didn’t quite work out that way.

  • IrishNeanderthal

    In the comments to the previous article, it looked like a Civil War was about to break out among Cranmer webfollowers, especially concerning events of the mid-17th Century..

    Perhaps if science would allow Cranmer to temporarily undergo an Incredible Hulk-like transformation when things were getting out of hand, and he wolde waxen wroth and

    Fain wold he brakë frith and crackë heads

    then order might be restored, without the necessity of resorting to measures as in earlier times when

    Swingéd Cnut Cyng with swung sword

    If peace were restored, then maybe some coherent discussion on these matters might follow, and that would certainly be a damgudthyng.

    • dannybhoy

      The Cavaliers were dashing, and up for a thrashing
      Which they took at the hands of Old Noll,

      • dannybhoy

        My wife just sent me this joke from her girfriend..

        A young man named Donald bought a horse from a farmer for $250.

        The farmer agreed to deliver the horse the next day. The next day,
        the farmer drove up to Donald’s house and said, “Sorry son, but I
        have some bad news, the horse died.”

        Donald replied, “Well, then just give me my money back.”
        The farmer said, “Can’t do that. I went and spent it already.”
        Donald said, “Ok, then, just bring me the dead horse.”
        The farmer asked, “What ya gonna do with him?”
        Donald said, “I’m going to raffle him off.”
        The farmer said, “You can’t raffle off a dead horse!”
        Donald said, “Sure I can, watch me. I just won’t tell anybody he’s dead.”
        A month Later, the farmer met up with Donald and asked,
        “What happened with that dead horse?”
        Donald said, “I raffled him off. I sold 500 tickets at five dollars
        a piece and made a profit of $2495.”
        The farmer said, “Didn’t anyone complain?”
        Donald said, “Just the guy who won. So I gave him his five
        dollars back.”

        Donald just moved into the White House.

        • Politically__Incorrect

          I wonder if the horse’s name was Hilary?

          • Pubcrawler

            Prefer a horse with no name, myself.

          • Royinsouthwest

            In Britain, or only in a desert?

          • Pubcrawler

            The only time I want to know the name of a horse is if it’s going to win at decent odds.

      • IrishNeanderthal

        Here’s good old song:

        It’s one of the ruins that Cromwell knocked about a bit
        One that Oliver Cromwell knocked about a bit
        In the gay old days there used to be some doings
        No wonder that the poor old Abbey went to ruins
        Those who’ve studied history sing and shout of it
        And you can bet your life that isn’t a doubt of it
        Outside the Oliver Cromwell last Saturday night
        I was one of the ruins Cromwell knocked about a bit.



        Lyrics: http://monologues.co.uk/musichall/Songs-O/One-Of-The-Ruins.htm

        • dannybhoy

          Delightful, quite delightful..
          No wonder they invented television…

        • The Roundhead

          What creature’s that, with his short hairs,
          His little band, and huge long ears,
          That this new faith hath founded?
          The saints themselves were never such,
          The prelates ne’er ruled half so much;
          Oh! such a rogue’s a Roundhead.

          What’s he that doth the bishops hate,
          And counts their calling reprobate,
          ‘Cause by the Pope propounded;
          And thinks a zealous cobbler better
          Than learned Usher in ev’ry letter?
          Oh! such a rogue’s a Roundhead.

          What’s he that doth HIGH TREASON say,
          As often as his YEA and NAY,
          And wish the King confounded;
          And dares maintain that Mr Pim
          Is fitter for a crown than him?
          Oh! such a rogue’s a Roundhead.

          What’s he that if he chance to hear
          A little piece of COMMON PRAYER,
          Doth think his conscience wounded;
          Will go five miles to preach and pray,
          And meet a sister by the way?
          Oh! such a rogue’s a Roundhead.

          What’s he that met a holy sister
          And in a haycock gently kiss’d her?
          Oh! then his zeal abounded:
          ‘Twas underneath a shady willow,
          Her Bible served her for a pillow,
          And there he got a Roundhead.

          • Anton

            The Vicar of Bray…

          • Good summary of the infighting within the Church of England following the Reformation. Jack was introduced to this at his Catholic school to illustrate the folly of Reformation, the absence of a solid doctrinal basis for Protestantism.

            In Charles’ day, the “High Church” resisted the Calvinistic attempts at removing church hierarchy. It supported the Divine Right of Kings, Episcopal church government, rich liturgy and establishment of the Church of England. The “Low Church” was Puritan/Presbyterian; and then there was the “Latitudinarian Church”. Puritans, Presbyterians and Baptists favoured plain, non-sacramental, bible based, preaching services. The High Church was the King’s church: meaning that the King of England was not only the Head of the church, but was also seen as imbuing its holiness.

          • Anton

            And I had thought that the church belonged to Christ. How foolish I was!

            The “solid doctrinal base” for protestantism is the Bible. The word of God, you know. Rather than the word of man, the Magisterium.

          • Hah, no answer.
            The Church is Christ, the people of God, it’s visible leadership and doctrinal development entrusted to His chosen stewards until His return.
            As for scripture, Jack agrees the bible is the doctrinal and dogmatic basis of Christianity – and it is interpreted faithfully for us by the Church. Protestantism may claim “sola scriptura” but it cannot agree what scripture actually means and has no teaching authority to resolve disunity. Hence the Vicar of Bray.

          • Anton

            I don’t mind being called a heretic by people who pray to Mary.

          • Not forgetting the “idolatry” of the Mass.

          • Anton

            Apart from transubstantiation I’ve no strong views on the Mass. It is a form of Communion. I regard the argument between protestants and Catholics about whether or not it is a sacrifice as a confusion between chronos and kairos.

          • dannybhoy

            Thanks Jack.

  • Dominic Stockford

    It seems, as I write, that a parliamentary plot is unfolding, which may remove him yet! Hurrah, cried the plebeians – the good men of parliament have done a deed for us!

    • Manfarang

      Donald’s deeds are concerned with his own and his family business interests.

      • Dominic Stockford

        Speaker Bercow is not called Donald, as far as I am aware. So your comment is utterly redundant.

        • Manfarang

          The deeds of the one who hoped to make the speech in Westminster Hall of course.

  • Politically__Incorrect

    I’ve wondered why Sally chose to have an affair with his seriously unattractive cousin. The stress of living with a poison dwarf must be worse than I thought

    • bluedog

      Sometimes these things happen as acts of revenge for other injuries, in Sally’s case, never being able to wear high heels.

    • Inspector General

      Did she really! Is that fellow acquainted with Snow White too?

  • Shadrach Fire

    Just when will one of our more traditionalist MP’s get up and say, Mr Speaker, you have offended this house with your hypocritical outburst that lacked any sense of integrity and call for his resignation.

    Along with the London Mayor who went to a reception with diplomats from about fifteen countries who have travel bans from any one from Israel but protested against Trump who was only doing what Obama had done not long before.

  • Inspector General

    Saints be praised! Diane Abbott backed the Brexit bill. Relief all round, what!

    Having himself been on the receiving end of ‘female black attitude’ in the past, the Inspector did not envy Corbyn one bit if the need came for him to discipline her…

    • 1642+5thMonarchy

      Brexit’s a done deal now. The Lords won’t dare sabotage it. The government has to deliver a Hard Brexit now or be destrpyed. Providence at work: all the obstacles erected by the Remoaners have collapsed and engineered a Harder Brexit than perhaps Mrs May originally intended. With a government set on Hard Brexit the EU has little negotiating leverage. The Lord at work?

      • Inspector General

        Actually, it would not be an understatement to say that the existence of parliament as we know it is at stake unless Brexit is delivered. The Lords wouldn’t dare stand in the way of this…

        • 1642+5thMonarchy

          Can I be your hideous acolyte as well Inspector?

          • Inspector General

            1642, who could deny you!

          • 1642+5thMonarchy

            Chuffed!

          • Inspector General

            A fellow was just reflecting on Corbyn and Abbott no longer forming a beautiful coupling. One suspects there must have been times when mama’s then little baby was refused his shortenin’ over policy disagreements. Perhaps for days on end…

          • Pubcrawler

            Please, I’ve just eaten.

          • Mrs Proudie of Barchester

            Indeed! Gentlemen, please, lady present….

          • Shortenin’ Bread
            (Traditional – 1930’s)

          • Mrs Proudie of Barchester

            The Thought Police will soon be round to see you…

          • dannybhoy

            We could arrange a ‘visiting’ rota.

          • A Traditional Folk Tune from the 1930’s, my good woman. Updated by the Beech Boys in the 1970’s, if Jack recalls correctly.

          • David

            Ahhr the “Beach Boys”, now you’re talking. Used to fancy myself as a bit of a surfer – hilarious !

          • Here you go:

          • David

            You’re a star ! Thanks Jack.

          • David

            Jack, if you don’t zip it, you’ll be shipped off to the penal colonies soon….
            Woops can’t say that either can I….
            See you in Oz !

          • Inspector General

            “Junior, when you go off to private school to learn how dem no good white folk do, don’t you be forgetting no shortenin’ bread, ya hear!”

          • David

            You have the better of me there. Is there a translation ?

          • Inspector General

            No. Thought you might have an idea of what’s going on.

          • David

            That made me laugh !

          • 1642+5thMonarchy

            The blood runs ice-cold…

          • David

            Spare us such matters !

            Please ! I was enjoying a small whiskey !

          • 1642+5thMonarchy

            Have a treble to wash away the picture in your mind David.

          • Inspector General

            The Inspector wouldn’t know personally, David, but it is understood to be ‘strong meat’ down underneath…

            {Gulp}

          • dannybhoy

            Fortified Australian wine, Albanian whiskey…
            Where will it all end??

    • Royinsouthwest

      Are you relieved that Diane Abbott backed the Brexit bill or by the fact that her migrane has gone, or both?

    • dannybhoy

      Only ‘black attitude’ Inspector?
      Come come, you are being too modest..

  • Seven dwarfs Hannah, Happy being one.

  • David

    The Saints be Praised !
    Article 50 approved, and with no wrecking amendments !
    The path ahead is clearing – soon we’ll have fought our way through !
    My next passport can be a genuine British one, again !
    The hand of Providence !
    Praise be to God !

  • not a machine

    Unlike remoaners who have had my cake and delayed its serving ,I am happy that at last the people have had there say and we shall be enacting article 50 .The perhaps key thing for remoaners is considering how much debt can make your economy look good or perhaps left economics in general as one former chancellor retorted “so what” ,well so what , so what do debts do to economies …..mmm the only tory to vote against ….could it be taxation deferred ….. still at 2 trn£ and historically high taxation don’t want to seem pleased at UK , just how much more taxation do you think euro countries can take …. ahh but all that debt is keeping euro worthless and helping exports ,mmmm but its building inflation .the future success of the EU relies on it defeating inflation ,so what do you say I wanted out because I don’t believe they can esacpe all the deficit and debt …. so what so what so what ,I mean to be a remoaner you must believe the euro is slow moving success rather a currency trying to traverse the m25 at rush hour .Still we did ask for some time for an answer to our concerns and worries and were told we need more Europe .Perhaps the vote isn’t about less Europe ,but it is still to be seen how things work out for EU economics ,I don’t particulary wish decent European citizens an unnecessarily bad time , but my referendum vote was because having seen the late 70s ,if you don’t get a broad functioning ecnomony you get bought by a country that does .A debt crisis ,is not what one may want when creating a large currency , you just start removing liquidity from the thin economy , where money velocities are less.
    Anyhow that’s more than enough excitement for jan/feb for me so will sign off for a while , have number of things I need to think through around this beautiful and wonderful creation that we live in ,hopefully be back in month or two

    • 1642+5thMonarchy

      Well said. People need to see that much of the economic progress since 1997 is a debt induced mirage. In 2008 the authorities had a chance to tackle it but opted for inflating it all again with oodles more cheap debt. Most asset classes are wildly over valued (not many UK shares surprisingly). No one can see a way out other than debt right offs, which will trigger asset valuation/capitalisation mayhem, or hyper-inflation.

    • dannybhoy

      Not wishing to be rude but could you try introducing more paragraphs into your comments? It would make it easier to get your points across. You obviously put a lot of work into it and therefore it deserves to be read. Paragraphs and full stops would help! ;0)

    • Jonty Cecil

      Acording to Simon Heffer, we’d of joined the Euro if it wasn’t for Enoch Powell who bent the ears of both Heath and Thatcher.

      • Alien & Stranger

        Point of grammar: “We’d have joined…”

  • Manfarang

    After his military coup in the US maybe.

    • Dominic Stockford

      He hasn’t had one yet, nor is there any need, the people voted him in. Well done them.

      • Manfarang

        A Very American Coup (Enabling Act giving full powers to fight Islam…)

        • Dominic Stockford

          Firstly, that isn’t a coup, its simply defence of the realm. Secondly, he needs to defend the US against Islam, it is a real and present danger.

          • Manfarang

            Defense of America. Get the spelling right! The American courts seem to be upholding the constitution.

          • Dominic Stockford

            The Americans cannot spell, neither it seems, can you. They take our language and wreck it to no purpose. ‘Defence’ is the word.

            You might note what the original judge actually said and ruled – it ‘might’ be unconstitutional. They did not say it ‘is’ unconstitutional. To say ‘is’ would have been tricky, given that Obama had bans against all those countries at one time or another without a word being mentioned by anyone – had the judge said ‘is’ he could well have found himself impeached and out of a job for failing to defend it in Obama’s time.

          • Manfarang

            The Americans have spelling bees, if you think you know all about English spelling just tell me the rules for spelling words from languages such as Arabic or Chinese. Is it Koran or Quran, Peking or Beijing?
            The original judge knows that it is the Supreme Court that makes the final deliberation as to whether something is constitutional or not. If President Trump is smart he might redraft the executive order after all he is smart enough to accept the one China policy.

          • Dominic Stockford

            It is the English language, not the American language. We are in charge of spelling in the English language. It is one of the most tiresome things about the colonials, their desire to wreck their own language.

            And the US local courts (with their political appointees in the chair) have in fact gone with the ‘status quo’, and made no definitive ruling – despite the claims of the MSM. It is amazing that the local courts (with their political appointees) seem so determined to stop legislation written by Obama and his people.

          • Manfarang

            No one is in charge of spelling. There is no body which determines what spelling should be unlike in France-the Académie française . Anyone can in fact spell English how they want. Is it hummus, humus, hommus, or hommos?

          • Dominic Stockford

            THE OED defines spellings in the UK – if what you say is true then your previously mentioned USA spelling bees are utterly pointless – as everyone who gives a spelling can simply proclaim at as being ‘correct’, regardless of what the arbiter decides.

            As for ‘that word’ – the correct spelling is ‘disgusting’.

          • Manfarang

            The OED has yogurt , yoghurt, yoghourt
            None of these spellings are more correct than the others. It is usage .
            I have no doubt that the spelling bees would follow Merriam-Webster.
            I will follow my Hobson-Jobson.
            In advertising you will see such words proclaimed as Krispy Kreme.
            Anyway Israeli food is not disgusting. You can stick with your tripe.

          • Dominic Stockford

            Tripe is also spelt ‘disgusting’. And, there is plenty of Middle Eastern food that is pleasant. The Israeli fried chicken is something special.

  • Pubcrawler
  • MajorFrustration

    But still feels inclined to enjoy the perks