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“It seems there is an anti-populist cabal who believe they know what is best for the British public”

Goodness! It may come as no surprise that The Jupiter has named Mr. Trump as ‘Man of the Year’. This has not gone down well with Archdeacon Grantly, who up until the last minute was in the running. The Archdeacon has no quarrel Mr. Trump politically – far from it – but feels the president-elect has done little for the good folk of Barsetshire, whereas the Archdeacon has treated us all to his opinions ad nauseam. One notes The Jupiter does not run a ‘Woman of the Year’ feature, despite constant lobbying from Signora Neroni. No matter. One would not allow one’s name to be put forward for such a thing unless it was entitled ‘Lady of the Year’. One has standards.

The Advent Ball at Gatherum Castle was a splendid affair and a hotbed of political gossip. The skill is to move discreetly from group to huddle keeping one’s ears open. One group of cheroot-puffing gentlemen were much animated by talk of a Tory rebellion against Mrs. Dismay. It seems there is an anti-populist cabal who believe they know what is best for the British public and are working their socks off to derail Brexit. Sir Abraham Haphazzard and Sir Omicron Pie expressed grave concern over Mrs. Dismay’s Snoopers’ Charter, which was passed in the House quite recently, and wondered if they would have to disclose everything about their respective clients. Everything, from letters, diaries, telegrams and those electronic thingummies that got Mrs. Hildabeast into so much trouble will be scrutinised and recorded. Nothing will be secret any more. Except, of course, for the things kept secret by the government, for this is a one-way street to perdition.

Archdeacon Grantly and Dean Trefoil expressed outrage at the Home Office decision to prevent the visit of three Syrian prelates and wondered, if our Lord had been born in the Royal Mews, whether the three kings would have been allowed to disembark at Dover (one feels Balthazar might have been strip-searched). Signora Neroni wept crocodile tears at the thought of the handsome Signor Renzi falling on his sword, only to perk up immediately when Mr. Slope pointed out that, with resignation postponed, there is time enough for her to carry on up the Tiber. News from the Ukrainian Front, where 150 gallant Tommy Atkins are manning the line against the Bolshevik Horde, was shared by Colonel Flashman of the 23rd Royal Mounted Gynaecologists, who reported the troops are tackling whatever is put in front of them with vim and vigour, mainly kapusniak, borsch and dumplings – the resultant flatulence being calculated to bring tears to the eyes of the bravest Cossack should they attempt a cross-border sortie. Mr. Slope was much taken with the Colonel’s hand-crafted sabretache, which admittedly hangs at a jaunty angle and swings majestically when he walks. At this point the orchestra struck up and I was swept onto the floor by my Lord the Bishop for a quick mazurka. Memories of this dazzling evening will stay with me for ever, like the never-quite-disappearing image of Mr. Blair’s cheesy grin.

We hear the dear Queen’s private lunch at The Goring was interrupted by a drunken intruder waving his arms about. How shocking, and how rude! As Mr. Slope says, ‘Every queen has the right to some privacy’, which is why he locks his door at night, but I’m sure once the Duke of Edinburgh has sobered up all will be well again.

One feels a political leader in this day and age needs a good surname to inspire their followers, something that sends a clear message, like Mrs. Ironheart, Mr.Valiant or Miss Winner. Congratulations, Mr. Nuttall, you have a tricky task ahead.

As for our Cathedral news, all I can say is we are very busy. Advent will soon give way to Christmas itself, which means the decorations must be replenished and thought given to our traditional carol service, though I am sure Mr. Harding has it well in-hand. We had trouble last year with the ‘Little Donkey’ but a bucket, spade and brush should guard against a repeat. The brasses are polished and the altar is dressed in the appropriate liturgical colour – a fine piece of needlework by dear Mrs. Quiverfull, done in her free time and helped by her husband, who was able to tie a knot in it.

Well, my dears, as the Advent Calendar of Time opens its window on the Chocolate Bar of Inevitability and the Sugar Mouse of Fabianism crawls up the Trouser Leg of Attenborough, ‘tis time to mount the wooden stairs to Bedfordshire. I shall sleep well tonight, knowing that you are all safe and well, and shall remember you all in my prayers.

  • Mike Stallard

    I do not often laugh at blogs.
    But I made a big exception of this one!
    Bravura piece! Excellent! Trouser leg indeed…

    • Mrs Proudie of Barchester

      Then I am honoured, dear Mike.

  • Politically__Incorrect

    “..as the Advent Calendar of Time opens its window on the Chocolate Bar of Inevitability and the Sugar Mouse of Fabianism crawls up the Trouser Leg of Attenborough…” Wonderful metaphor Mrs P, though I rather hoped the “mouse” was in fact a larger form of rodent.
    So, with the regularity of a Remainers legal action, I hear that our former PM is cashing it in on the lecture circuit, blaming his political demise on the rise of “populism”, a movement he wants to help oppose. He does not realise that the opposite of “populism” is “elitism”, something he is particularly adept at. So let’s hope the rat of realism finds it’s way up his trouser leg to where he would have kept his manhood if Sam hadn’t removed them, and remind him that he lost because of his detached elitism, not because of the porcupine of populism.

    • IanCad

      At his age it would be more like down the trouser leg.

  • chefofsinners

    One notes that Mr Cameldung has made a speech this day, bemoaning the rise of populism, which he believes cost him his job. It would seem that populism is the new word for democracy.

    • Dreadnaught

      Quite so Chef.
      In recent years, the media and disgruntled ex-Prime Ministers and have been to at pains to identify populism in Western Europe as a phenomenon exclusively of the ‘Far Right’.
      Any commonly held opinion that reflects the kind of issues, such as immigration or jobs, to them is the equivalence of evil populism and knuckle-dragging ‘far-rightism’ is a deliberate ploy to stifle the ordinary people. In fact, the claim that the people (howeverdefined) are the only legitimate sovereign power and have been deprived of power, is the usual bleat of the left wing intellectuals and politicans of the Trotskyist Left such as the Momentum Gang.
      Unlike ‘Fascism’ which is the next insult waiting to be thrown around, Populism insists on the values of direct representation of the views of the ordinary people rather than those preferred by hierarchy, where it is the community rather than the State which is said to be paramount. This is called Democracy; the exact opposite of Fascism.
      Voters who support populist parties do not always position themselves on the extreme Right quite the opposite in fact but not exclusively, such as in the cases of the Front National in France; the Freedom Party in Austria Golden Dawn in Greece or closer to home the BUF.
      Making ammunition of the words ‘populist’ and ‘extreme right’ synonymous, or lumping all populist opinions under the ‘radical Right populist’ banner for ease of left-wing propaganda or to maintain the status quo, is dangerously detrimental to our understanding of what we expect of our democracy. Not only that; it contributes to the unjustified maligning of people indigenous of the European Race and culture and the parties that echo their opinions and aspirations.

      • Anton

        Worth repeating: Nazi was short for National Socialist…

        • Dreadnaught

          A cloak of convenience.

    • bluedog

      Noted too, Chef. It was only a matter of time before Dave broke cover, although doing so in the company of a backwoodsman like Dubya was probably not his preferred option. There is little doubt that Dave will be looking for a platform, and the impending extinction of Obama’s political career provides a natural opportunity. One wonders how long it will be before Dave is appointed as a visiting fellow of the Obama Chair of Progressive Studies in the Mandela School of …, well you know the rest.

      • chefofsinners

        This is breathtaking hypocrisy from the mainstream parties. Having spent the last 20 years straining every sinew to get more people to vote for them, shamelessly adopting policies they believed were vote winners and dropping those that the focus groups said were unpopular; Electing and ditching leaders on the basis of their approval ratings; Spinning everything until it was twisted out of recognition; Wasting millions of public money on propaganda; Doing anything to be popular. Now they find themselves outflanked by the electorate, who are sick of them and have started to vote for what they actually want, rather than what they are told they should want. So they call their opponents ‘populist’ as if they themselves occupy some moral high ground from where they look down contemptuously at the taxpayers, who exist only to foot the bill for their lifestyle.
        Mene, mene, tekel, pharsin.

        • Mrs Proudie of Barchester

          Spot on dear Chef….

  • magnolia

    “Balthazar might have been strip-searched!” Fantastic Also doubt gold, frankincense, and myrrh would have made it through customs….

    • bluedog

      Indeed. Gold would have fallen foul of anti-money laundering provisions, while frankincense and myrrh are clearly banned substances even when held in small quantities for private use.

    • Inspector General

      One was listening to the News Quiz many years ago (can’t stand the thing now) when it was raised that you could import, export as much bull semen as you needed in the EU.

      (Chef, something else for you to arouse your wife with this evening…)

      • chefofsinners

        I was in your native Gloucestershire this evening, and drove past a place named ‘Bullocks Horn’.
        My mind turned to all the bullocks you are responsible for.

        • Inspector General

          Bullocks don’t have horns…

          • chefofsinners

            Some do, some don’t.
            It is the removal of other parts which makes a bullock.
            Bullock’s Horn is a real place, although upon investigation I find that I had crossed the border into Wiltshire.

            http://www.whataddress.co.uk/postcode/sn16-9dz

  • Dreadnaught
    • Anton

      He’ll be PM soon, yippee!

      • Dreadnaught

        Then Mrs May will have to let him come in here.

        • Mrs Proudie of Barchester

          Don’t be silly, Dreaders…Mrs May only lets in those with impeccable Jihadist credentials. It’s objecting to Jihadists that gets you banned.

    • Politically__Incorrect

      I think this is actually going to help him and his party in the long run by bringing into sharp relief the fact that the judiciary is political and biased. I wonder if this case would have happened if it had been the Moroccans chanting about fewer white people? Almost certainly not I think.

  • Inspector General

    Populism is the now, Mrs Proudie. One of the biggest crimes our political masters are responsible for is the lie foisted on the British about the size of their family. 2 children is the sensible number. Anymore would be anti-social in a way, they implied. That’s what we were told and that’s how it was – and it allowed said masters to bring in as many immigrants as they could fit in here. To whom, surprise surprise, the restricted family size did not apply! No wonder the people are furious! Time to shake things up a bit, and that goes for the evil judges imposed upon us too!

    • chefofsinners

      However much you shake things up, I suspect you are past child bearing age, Inspector.

      • Inspector General

        You’ll just have to tell your wife you’re feeling broody, chef…

        • chefofsinners

          I think we have found the cause of the low birth rate. How widely have you shared this advice Inspector?

    • Dreadnaught

      An average of 2.4 children was deemed to be desireable for achievable growth and security.
      The womb is a potent weapon.

    • Mrs Proudie of Barchester

      Indeed, dear Inspector, populism is fast becoming an irresistible force, too late I fear for Sweden, Germany and France. I understand the German people are now referred to (by Merkel and Co) as ‘the people who have lived here for a long time.’ What astounds me is that people stand for this drivel, and even applaud the old hag.

      • Inspector General

        Frau Mackerel’s an oddity, dear thing. For a woman who looks so much like Hitler’s sister when you pencil in a small moustache, she’s nothing like him…

        • Mrs Proudie of Barchester

          She has no dress sense. To my mind she looks as like a bag of frogs covered by a tarpaulin…

          • bluedog

            The Germans do uniforms rather than couture, Mrs P.

            There’s a wonderful photograph you would have seen of Mrs May and Mrs Merkel standing at adjoining lecterns, looking across at each other. The body language speaks volumes, and would that be a look of fear on Merkel’s face? One suspects that Merkel feels her role as head hen in Europe is under threat.

          • Anton

            The way things are going, with Italian banks, Deutsche Bank, Geert Wilders, Beppe Grillo et al, there soon won’t be an EU to Brexit from… such a shame!

          • bluedog

            Things seem to be unravelling at an ever-increasing speed; it’s perma-crisis on a widening front. One wonders how the Remainer elite are coping with this downfall of their dreams. It’s scarcely six months since they forecast doom for the UK, when in fact it’s doom for the EU. And Doom means Doom. Blair is incorrigible of course and more than capable of reversing his position in mid-sentence.

          • chefofsinners

            I love it when vicar’s daughters fight.

          • bluedog

            Yes, reminiscent of Cluedo, this clash of the Vicars’ Daughters. How will it end and where? Most importantly, what will be the means for establishing supremacy? Best of three hands of Bezique; ditto Backgammon? Ping-pong? Croquet? Strictly? The possibilities for ritual combat along these lines is end-less. But to draw the public and to sell tables of eight, replete with WAGs for truly outrageous prices at a gala dinner, one suggests mud-wrestling. The TV rights alone would pay off the national debt.

          • chefofsinners

            You are a true visionary.

          • Sarky

            A bulldog chewing a wasp!!

        • Merchantman

          Except she does the race bit with a new twist.

      • Anton

        She might yet prove as disastrous a Chancellor for the German people as Adolf Hitler.

    • David

      I agree. Only two racial groups have limited family sizes, the west and China, whilst elsewhere, usually, numbers climb. Yet it is to the west that they all look both for aid, and now they try to crowd in here, which if unchecked, will destroy us all.

  • David

    A rather late “well done, and hurrah for Mrs Proudie and Barsetshire !” from me.

    I am particularly pleased with “’tis time too mount the wooden stairs to Bedfordshire”. It reminded me of one of my great-grandmother’s sayings, related in a full bodied Devonshire accent of, “’tis late, so up the wooden hill to where the donkeys don’t kick ye”, which was presumably an echo back to a much earlier age when all good yeoman farming folk, like my ancestors, stabled the animals on the ground floor and slept above them for warmth !

    And with that thought I’ll bid one and all….. good night !

    • CliveM

      Bit early!

      • David

        It was a hard day !

    • Mrs Proudie of Barchester

      Blessings, dear David.

  • Inspector General

    Mrs Proudie. Listening to tonight’s radio news reminds an Inspector that the last time he passed Barchester’s King George VI playing fields, football practice was in full gusto. Can you assure the Inspector that not one of the cathedrals dodgy chapter are directly involved in the coaching…

    • Mrs Proudie of Barchester

      Goodness! Football is a game for urchins, dear Inspector. As a rule, the cathedral clergy refrain from physical jerks, though what goes on in the Cloister after Evensong is another matter. But my tally of Georges only stretches as far as George IV…have I missed something?

      • Inspector General

        You seem to be two Georges short, dear thing. Never mind.

        We can no longer, as a nation, trust our young to football coaches. Not when several score are looking at Nonce Wing accommodation in various HMPs. To that end, the Inspectorate issues the following guidance to the parents of England…

        All concerned parents whose boys are undergoing football coaching, the following is advisable. On arrival back home, the child should be immediately inspected in three areas. Mouth, anus and genitals. This to take place up to and including fifteen years of age. It is suggested that mothers undertake this work. They can spot ‘irregularities’ that much better. On finding any, a constable should be summonsed, and an adequate supply of carbolic be on hand to clean up after with. The press then to be notified, and payment from them to be negotiated. .

        • Sarky

          Have you sought help?
          I know this time of year is particularly hard.

          • Inspector General

            Think of the victims, Sarky. They are the ones needing help. And give thanks that the next generation of young footballers are hopefully spared what the lads endured.

          • Sarky

            Let’s hope so.

      • bluedog

        George Best?

      • chefofsinners

        C’est la VI.

  • chefofsinners

    Good to see The Jupiter bang on trend with Mr Chump as their man of the year.
    I see that Eternity magazine has also named him Mammon of the Year, while Pravda has awarded the Russian state’s highest honour, Dope of the Year.

    • Anton

      No, he’s Mammal of the Year.

      • chefofsinners

        Or has it perched on his head.

      • chefofsinners

        Mrs Proudie’s buns are in the running for mammary of the year.

        • Politically__Incorrect

          We’ll have to keep abreast of that one to see which way it swings. I’m more of a dumplings man myself.

          • Inspector General

            Mama’s little baby loves shortnin’…

    • dannybhoy

      There’s no disputin’ he came up trumps…

  • len

    “No one believes more firmly than Comrade Napoleon that all animals are equal. He would be only too happy to let you make your decisions for yourselves. But sometimes you might make the wrong decisions, comrades, and then where should we be?”
    ― George Orwell, Animal Farm.

    • HedgehogFive

      After the uprising of the 17th of June
      The Secretary of the Writers Union
      Had leaflets distributed in the Stalinallee
      Stating that the people
      Had forfeited the confidence of the government
      And could win it back only
      By redoubled efforts.

      Would it not be easier
      In that case for the government
      To dissolve the people
      And elect another?

      Bertolt Brecht, 1953 https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Die_L%C3%B6sung

  • Royinsouthwest

    Catholic Church: New Priests Will be Expected to Preach Global Warming
    https://wattsupwiththat.com/2016/12/10/catholic-church-new-priests-will-be-expected-to-preach-global-warming/

    Thank God for the Church of England! Or will it also embrace this heresy?

    • David

      That is an incredible politicisation of the priesthood. It is true to say that the C of E concurs with the warmists beliefs, but does not make it mandatory to preach it.

      • Anton

        I’m not sure it’s actually mandatory for Catholics (although it’s not a good thing whatever); can someone read the small print?

        • It’s not unreasonable for Catholics to look to the Church for guidance on the social and economic issues of our time. Whilst the Church is not interested in promoting a political agenda i.e. how to solve whatever problems might exist, it seems appropriate to educate priests on how to talk to their parishioners about this subject and encourage a balanced, moral solution to any problems we face.

          • Anton

            It’s not unreasonable for Catholics to look to the Church for guidance on the social and economic issues of our time.

            I agree. But the extent of warming due to manmade carbon dioxide is a scientific issue, and then only a political issue if the warming turns out to be dangerous. This scientist believes it has been greatly exaggerated by the IPCC for political purposes. Pope Francis needs to choose his advisers better.

          • The nature and causes of global warming and its consequences, really remains to be seen. Scientists are divided at present and if the proponents of human causes of global warming are correct, then concerted action is needed now. It reminds Jack of the early warnings by economists and demographers back in the 1970’s about our aging population and the pressures to come on pensions, health, welfare and social care. No planning then because the “science” was contested, this became political and people didn’t want to take tough decisions.
            Pope Francis has good, solid scientific advisers available to him. He hasn’t ruled “infallibly” on the subject but he has drawn attention to some valid moral principals that should inform our actions. Jack may or may not agree with him, but the subject is worthy of proper discussion. As a Catholic, one is not bound by Church opinion on scientific matters. However, one is bound by the moral principle underpinning them: – the earth’s resources should be preserved and cared for in the interests of all living people and the generations to come; and they should be used for the wellbeing and betterment of all mankind.
            Good solid subjects for any Christian priest to teach and engage with his flock on. And, of course, if the principles are accepted, they lead inevitably to political debates and divisions.

          • Anton

            It is true that the “nature and causes of global warming and its consequences, really remains to be seen”. But we have been able to say for a century what the warming effect of a given amount of carbon dioxide is in a DRY atmosphere. The question is how much that effect is amplified by the effect of water vapour, which transfers latent heat energy from the surface to higher in the atmosphere by rising off hot land and then condensing into cloud – which in turn reflects more sunlight direct to space. THAT calculation is so complex that it is, frankly, guesswork; so, until or unless computer modelling improves, we have to put the values of the relative strengths of the various effects into the equations using values observed in the field. When that is done, the effect of water vapour turns out to be weak; but the IPCC insists that water vapour amplifies the warming effect of carbon dioxide threefold and regularly cites its computer models as authoritative. An agenda from beyond science is discernible here.

            The best data are satellite data; it is these that indicate only weak amplification. The IPCC prefers terrestrial data, and there are also alarming indications that historic terrestrial data are being tampered with, to the effect that the extent of recent warming is exaggerated. In some cases it is legitimate to apply corrections to data, but if so then the results must NEVER be presented as if they are raw data; you must always present the raw data as well and explain who the correction has been calculated. Anything else is deeply shocking and a sure flag of an agenda other than the accruing of scientific knowledge.

            As for Pope Francis having “good, solid scientific advisers available to him”… very possibly, but he isn’t listening to those. The man who has been most influential in determining Vatican policy on climate change is the secular scientist Hans Joachim (“John”) Schnellnhuber. He has called for an “Earth Constitution that would transcend the UN Charter” along with the creation of a “Global Council…elected by all the people on Earth” and a “Planetary Court..a transnational legal body open to appeals from everybody, especially with respect to violations of the Earth Constitution.” (The two main issues of “protecting the earth” are climate change and global depopulation.) See:

            http://www.nowtheendbegins.com/pope-francis-ready-to-talk-about-climate-change-global-depopulation-and-world-government/

            Pope Francis’ advisers on this subject are semi-New Age types whose agenda in some cases includes abortion, the restriction of development in impoverished countries, and disguised eugenics. Strange bedfellows for any Catholic.

            http://www.climatedepot.com/2015/09/24/special-report-unholy-alliance-exposing-the-radicals-advising-pope-francis-on-climate/

            Pope Francis knows that he is not a scientist but, like all of us, he bears responsibility for his words – and a frightful responsibility, in view of his position and James 3:1. He needs, as I said, to choose his advisers more wisely.

          • Those ’70s demographics warnings must have been lost in the noise of the deluge of then-current panic prophesies, Jack. What I recall most is the hullabaloo over running out oil and food, global cooling…yes, cooling…and the looming “population bomb.” Yes, a few researchers hit on a correct projection, but without a solid empirical backing, it was unable to stand out from the popular alarmism. Rhen, as now, the political positions and the media determined which science is going to get the centre stage and limelight.

            The main problem with warming alarmism, which in face of the nearly 2-decade long “pause” is now sold as “climate change,” is that its predictions and projections have failed, in spite of attempted “adjustments” of data and outright fraud and political pressure. So, no matter how many amazing scientific advisers Pope Francis may have, none of them are of much use on that subject. This is simply because we do not yet have the science to analyse, understand and much less predict world-wide climate patterns. It’s like expecting Classical Greek philosophers to describe the nature and behaviour of their atoms.

          • Jack is currently agnostic on the matter. That said, his son is an oceanographer and meteorologist in the British Royal Navy, and informs Jack the polar caps are melting, sea levels are rising and weather systems globally are changing.
            Jack’s main point is that the way we care for the earth, use and share its resources is a moral matter and the Church has an obligation to contribute to the debate and teach principles.

          • Such a fine thing to have a son in Her Majesty’s service, Jack! May the Almighty bless and protect him and his mates as they guard our alliance while we sleep in comfort.

            I will only say that there are not a few oceanographers who tell us that such changes are well within the historical norms, have occurred frequently even in the not too distant past, and that they are unlikely to be caused by human activity. It is such things that the debate is over; not about whether to care or not about Creation. Pope Francis has not taken a agnostic stand as you have, but openly favours governmental and social activist’s positions.

          • He’s a burden, Avi.

          • Not clear on whom you mean, Jack. Probably not the young man, your son, for surely the RN has been adequately supplying him with his salted beef, daily grog, all the sea biscuits the weevils have rejected and officer’s wages. As for Francis, I’ll assure you now that had your papal conclave remembered to seek my able advice on their selection, I would have recommended against a socialist Argentine. Still, better that he advocate for carbon taxes than fix his attention on his beloved Malvinas, as he calls them.

          • IrishNeanderthal

            I am pretty much convinced that anthropogenic global warming is real.

            I am, though, antagonized when I hear media types going on about it.

          • CliveM

            I agree. Global warming is happening. The only question is what is driving it. Is it cyclical or man made?

            Personally I started as a sceptic, but I am increasingly convinced that it is being driven by human behaviour.

            I’m not sure however if anything effective can be done about it. We will simply need to adapt.

          • Anton

            Nobody disputes that carbon dioxide is a greenhouse gas and that human activity since the Industrial Revolution has raised its concentration in the atmosphere from 280 to 400 parts per million on a molecular basis. The hard question is how much warming this induces in an atmosphere which also contains water vapour. (The calculation without water vapour was first done about 100 years ago, by Arrhenius, and is undisputed; but water vapour complicates things so much that we have no real idea what the answer is, and the IPCC claims that water vapour magnifies the effect of carbon dioxide nearly threefold. Satellite data suggest the effect is much smaller.)

          • Anton

            Global weather is not longterm stable; in human history yet before the Industrial Revolution there was the little Ice Age, the Roman warming, and so on.

      • Heaven forbid that the Church should preach on pressing social and moral issues of our time!

        • Royinsouthwest

          The extent to which mankind’s activities are affecting our climate (assuming that we do have some effect on it) is a scientific matter. Such effects might be damaging, as the Greens and political hangers on keep saying, or they might be beneficial – increasing CO2 levels in the atmosphere stimulates plant growth thus reducing global hunger. Climate change probably has a mixture of effects, some beneficial and some adverse. These may be distributed unequally so that some parts of the world the effects are on balance beneficial while in others the balance is adverse.

          Judging whether effects are beneficial is a matter for scientists, agronomists, economists geographers and, even, politicians and voters. The scope for moral judgments is probably more limited than the Catholic Church thinks but moral questions are involved, e.g. trying to persuade developing countries to adopt “green” policies might perpetuate poverty. Is that morally justifiable?

          • So it’s not “heresy”. You just happen to disagree with what you believe to be the Church’s position.

            Are you denying the issues are worthy of debate and discussion? And. of course, they have a moral dimension. Rising sea levels, from whatever cause, will impact most severely on poor nations. If the activities of man are contributing to this, then it is a matter for Christians about how we look after the planet and make use of its resources justly and responsibly.

            “Judging whether effects are beneficial is a matter for scientists, agronomists, economists geographers and, even, politicians and voters.”

            Of course. The science is necessary to provide the information about options and so is the moral debate about what is the right thing to do.

    • “Protecting the environment and caring for our common home — the Earth, belong fully to the Christian outlook on man and reality. Priests should be “promoters of an appropriate care for everything connected to the protection of creation.”

      Hardly a “heresy”. The guidelines for the formation of priests ask that they be prepared to have a good grasp of the global climate change problem and share this with their congregations.

      Now, talking about “heresy”, the same document states:

      “The Church, while profoundly respecting the persons in question, cannot admit to the seminary or to holy orders those who practice homosexuality, present deep-seated homosexual tendencies or support the so-called ‘gay culture.’ “

      Perhaps the Church of England should consider embracing this “heresy”? Or maybe the one that restricts ordination to men.

    • Merchantman

      Is Preaching Global Warming not in fact spouting hot air?

  • dannybhoy

    “One would not allow one’s name to be put forward for such a thing unless it was entitled ‘Lady of the Year’. One has standards.”
    ” Mr. Slope was much taken with the Colonel’s hand-crafted sabretache, which admittedly hangs at a jaunty angle and swings majestically when he walks. At this point the orchestra struck up and I was swept onto the floor by my Lord the Bishop for a quick mazurka.”
    ” The brasses are polished and the altar is dressed in the appropriate liturgical colour – a fine piece of needlework by dear Mrs. Quiverfull, done in her free time and helped by her husband, who was able to tie a knot in it.

    Well, my dears, as the Advent Calendar of Time opens its window on the Chocolate Bar of Inevitability and the Sugar Mouse of Fabianism crawls up the Trouser Leg of Attenborough, ‘tis time to mount the wooden stairs to Bedfordshire. I shall sleep well tonight, knowing that you are all safe and well, and shall remember you all in my prayers.”
    What would we do without brave Barsetshire!”
    Surely in the running as a replacement for The Archers?

  • David

    “an anti-populist cabal who believes they know what is best for the British public”

    Yes indeed Mrs Proudie, for this is the essence of the so called “liberal” or progressive politics. They the self-styled elite seek, through use of the mainstream media, to achieve a managed democracy, in which the sheep-people, the sheeple, are carefully herded into the directions and outcomes that they will select for us, whilst carefully maintaining the facade of a democracy. The whole of the liberal neo-conservative, globalist project is but a sham that has for some time now fooled most of the people for much of the time – but no longer !

    People are not so easy to manipulate as they, the superior ones, assumed. For thankfully a populist rejection of this oppressive scheme has surfaced in the form of Brexit, Trump’s election and the inexorable rise of the anti-globalist parties in many parts of Europe including France, Holland and Italy. Freedom is our most precious possession, so long may this, the peoples’ awakening continue !

  • Dreadnaught

    Merkel kept this new German law passed in August rather quiet, while the UK Brexiteers are labelled racist xenophobes.
    The German state of Bavaria has passed a controversial new integration law requiring all immigrants to respect the ‘dominant’ local culture.
    Bavaria was the first state to dictate where asylum seekers will live, in an attempt to stop them gathering in segregated communities within Germany
    .

    http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-4018606/Bavaria-passes-new-law-make-migrants-respect-dominant-local-culture.html

  • The Story of Jesus set to “Bohemian Rhapsody” from Queen. Really lovely.

    https://www.facebook.com/simonne.dale/videos/1642927119066735/

  • Many, many zingers to choose from again, Mrs P, but this one stood out as the most prophetic and chilling:

    Everything, from letters, diaries, telegrams and those electronic thingummies that got Mrs. Hildabeast into so much trouble will be scrutinised and recorded. Nothing will be secret any more. Except, of course, for the things kept secret by the government, for this is a one-way street to perdition.

    Prepare for Carl’s spellings scrutiny and stand firm in defense of #realenglish, as he prefers to scrutinize!

    • IrishNeanderthal

      No need to wait for Carl, nor is it fundamentally anything to do with which side of the Atalantic.

      With “z” versus “s”, there is a difficulty that there are some words which must always be spelt with an “s”. The two classes of word are quite easily told apart. The “ize” ending is an original classical Greek suffix added to a noun to give a verbal meaning:

      “Energize” means to put energy into people, or into a system.

      It is a living suffix, that you can still use to make new words, such as:

      “Bureaucratize” which means to make a system more bureaucratic;
      “Roboticize” means to make people robotic (for now, in their behaviour, but in future?)

      However, in words like;

      surprise, revise, despise

      the “ise” is simply part of the originally Latin word, and not a suffix.