Politicians

Right to Life: where do the Party Leaders currently stand?

Lord Alton has done a useful (and very interesting) bit of digging on how the current party leaders have voted over recent years on a series of Right to Life issues. It is reproduced here with permission and no further comment: their voting records rather speak for themselves.

Where They Stand – the political leaders, their parties, the candidates, and the right to life

2017 is the fiftieth anniversary of the passage of the 1967 Abortion Act. It went through its Second Reading in the House of Commons with only 29 MPs voting against. Since then more than 8 million British babies have been aborted and millions of human embryos experimented upon – with laws even allowing the creation of animal-human hybrid embryos. The next Parliament will almost certainly vote again on whether to permit euthanasia and today many more MPs now support the right to life.

When voters come to use their votes on June 8th they will not only be voting for a new Government, they will be voting for individual Members of Parliament who will hold in their hands the gift of life or death.

A voter who wants to affirm the right to life of an unborn child, stop destructive experiments on human embryos, and safeguard disabled people from the dangers of euthanasia, needs to establish where their individual candidates stand and weigh up the positions of the political parties.

Beyond all other questions, this one is about the right to life itself.

2017 Johnson Bill to further liberalise the Abortion laws
Theresa May – Abstained
Jeremy Corbyn – For
Tim Farron – Abstained

2015 Bill to Ban Sex Selective Gender Abortions
Theresa May – For
Jeremy Corbyn – Against
Tim Farron – Abstained

2015 Creation of 3-Parent Babies
Theresa May – Abstained
Jeremy Corbyn – For
Tim Farron – For

2008 Information for Disability Diagnosis
Theresa May – For
Jeremy Corbyn – Against
Tim Farron – Abstained

2008 Ban on Creating Animal Human Hybrid Embryos
Theresa May – For
Jeremy Corbyn – Abstained
Tim Farron – For

2008 Vote to Reduce Abortion to 20 weeks
Theresa May – For
Jeremy Corbyn – Against
Tim Farron – Abstained

2015 Vote on the Bill to legalise assisted suicide
Theresa May – Against
Jeremy Corbyn – Abstained
Tim Farron – Abstained

In Scotland Nicola Sturgeon, for the SNP, has called for women from Northern Ireland to be given free abortions on the NHS but she has consistently opposed the legalising of assisted suicide. The leader of the SNP at Westminster, Angus Robertson, abstained on the 2015 Assisted Suicide Bill, abstained on the 2017 Johnson Bill to further liberalise abortion, voted against the banning of sex selection abortions, and voted in favour of three parent babies and animal human hybrid embryos and voted against any reduction in the upper limit for abortions.

Caroline Lucas MP, of the Greens, was not in Parliament when some of the votes were taken but in 2015 voted for assisted suicide and voted for the 2017 Johnson Bill to further liberalise abortion, voted against the banning of sex selection abortions, and against independent abortion counselling.

A Question of Conscience

In both Houses Conservative Government Ministers have repeatedly insisted that beginning and end of life issues are a matter of conscience for individual Members and that there is not Party Policy.

The Labour Opposition says that MPs may follow their conscience but the Party has policy in favour of abortion.

The Liberal Democrats have made being pro-abortion a commitment of their party, favour an extension of the Abortion Act to Northern Ireland, and their spokesperson in the Lords recently said that it is their policy to permit assisted suicide.

For the SNP, Carol Monaghan (MP, Glasgow North West) says “The party Constitution enshrines freedom of conscience and meant I could join the SNP without compromising my faith.”

The Green Party has party policy supporting abortion and “non animal experiments” which includes support for experiments on human embryos.

Men and women gave their lives that we should have the freedom to live in a democracy rather than a dictatorship. When casting our votes we owe it to them to carefully consider where individual candidates and parties stand and to vote to protect the most vulnerable and defenceless among us.