Coptic Pope Tawadros II
Christian Persecution

The Palm Sunday massacre targeted Pope Tawadros II – why the media silence?

If a suicide bomber had detonated himself in a pew at St Peter’s Basilica while the Pope of Rome was presiding over the liturgy, the world’s media would be talking about an assassination attempt on the life of Francis, which it surely would have been. When a bomb or a bullet gets within a whisker (that is to say, within a church compound) of a pope at prayer, it may reasonably be surmised that the target is that praying pope. Why else would a rather devout Muslim seek to outfox security to gain entry to an iconic church on that particular day? It’s not likely to be for inter-religious dialogue and ecumenical fellowship, is it?

But when a suicide bomber tried to gain access to St Mark’s Coptic Orthodox Cathedral in Alexandria on Palm Sunday while the Pope of Alexandria was presiding over the liturgy, the world’s media seemed to ignore the presence of Tawadros II, for some reason, as though he were a bit player in a fringe play. To around 18 million Coptic Christians worldwide, he isn’t ‘a pope’; he is His Holiness the Pope, Patriarch of the See of St Mark in the Province of Alexandria, Egypt, Pentapolis, Libya, Nubia, Sudan and all Africa, with an apostolic lineage going all the way back to 42 AD. A bomb going off in his historical seat is an attack on him.

Alexandria’s pontiff doesn’t get as many column inches as Rome’s; perhaps he isn’t supreme enough. But you’d think an assassination attempt on his life – however amateurish and botched – would merit a few headlines, wouldn’t you? The mainstream media have condemned the Palm Sunday outrage with an outpouring of sorrow and sadness, compassion and prayers, and column inches dedicated to political assurances that more will (or must) be done. But no mention at all that Pope Tawadros II was the likely target.

Make no mistake, this was an attempt on the life of the Pope – not that Pope, but this one. And he is very vulnerable: if a photographer can snap a priest dashing down the street among his bloodied and dazed congregants, it really wouldn’t take much for a Daesh sniper to take a potshot at the Pope – they are rather conspicuous targets. Islamists might be politically fractured and theologically fragmented, but they are united in their belief that the Pope must die – this one and that one, along with both the others.

Daesh might have failed this time, but they will surely try again: “Crusaders and their apostate allies should know the bill between us and them is very big and they will pay it with rivers of blood from their children, God willing,” they announced shortly after the massacre. “Wait for us, for we will wait for you,” they added, as they lie in wait for the Pope of Alexandria to preside over another liturgy somewhere in his province. There’s no easy hiding.

Pope Tawadros II is the ecclesiastical equal to all the other popes and patriarchs, and the mainstream media ought to recognise and respect this. His jurisdiction was established at the Ecumenical Council of Nicaea in 325, and his forebears were present at the Council of Ephesus in 431, and at Chalcedon in 451. The Copts are not some quirky fringe Middle-Eastern cult, but true defenders of the Apostolic tradition and of Catholic and Orthodox doctrine. They are part of the Body of Christ; in us and with us, and we with them. When they bleed, we hurt. If they are decapitated, we lose a mind of mercy and a soul of grace.

The massacre of dozens of worshipping Coptic Christians is a barbarous sacrilege. An attempt on the life of His Holiness Pope Tawadros II is a sacrilegious blasphemy. Quite why the Anglican Communion News Service and the Times of Israel seem to be alone in recognising the real target is something of a mystery.

  • Maalaistollo

    How about the mystery of iniquity? That particular mystery also seems to be at work in the attempts of the West to remove President Assad and thereby end any hope for the continuation of Christianity in Syria and, as a bonus, give us another world war.

    • ecclesiaman

      Agreed. The MSM seem unable/unwilling to think there is something untoward here. Looks like 34 of the 59 missiles did not hit the target and those that did appear not to have been as successful as intended. The gas attack also looks fabricated as in 2013. Regime change for dubious reasons is the object. Trump has been duped IMO. Putin/Russia is the scapegoat however malign he may be.

      • Maalaistollo

        Putin may be malign, but at least he has his eyes open and is not afraid to express support for Christianity in the face of Islamic attacks.

        • Manfarang

          And kill off any journalists that disagree with him.

          • 1649again

            Well, he’s not all bad then.

          • Manfarang

            He is not Dimon to you.

        • ecclesiaman

          I am not too sure about his actual support for Christianity but he is certainly being misrepresented in the MSM, and thinks the west is planning more gas attacks to blame him for. The west is playing with fire and risks WW3 as you say. It leads one to think that somebody wants war and suffering. Why else keep poking the bear?

  • Anton

    It is not a mystery, Your Grace; the point is that our media are mainly interested in what happens in and to Western culture, and this happened outside it.

  • This report has a photograph of the Alexandria cathedral gatekeeper, ‘Am Nseem, without whom the tragedy would have been even greater. ‘We mourn the loss of lives, and we thank ‘Am Nseem for doing his job and taking care of his church and its people. May he rest in peace.’

    • Lucius

      Watched the video linked in the article. My heart mourned. All I could think was “Well done, thou good and faithful servant” (Matthew 25:21).

  • The mystery isn’t why the secular press ignore it, but why the rest of the Church does. The secular press only report on those things where they themselves can empathise … the death of other journalists, homosexuals, liberal causes. Christians – especially exotic foreign ones – illicit no empathy whatsoever. Thank you for remembering their plight and bringing it our attention too.

    • Manfarang

      The secular press only report on things they think will sell their newspapers hence little mention of things that happen abroad.

      • Royinsouthwest

        On the contrary, the secular press often ignores events which would be of widespread concern if it thinks those events do not fit its agenda. The problem of sexual abuse of mainly white British girls by “Asian” men, for example, receives much less coverage than would have been the case if girls from ethnic minorities had been targeted by white men in men different towns for several years.

        It all depends on the identity of the victims and the perpetrators. The more biased the newspaper, the more it will champion “equality.”

        • Manfarang

          The Daily Hail has full coverage I believe.

          • David

            It does.

  • Merchantman

    We definitely need a ‘united we stand in Jesus’ with orthodox belief and believers. We are under attack from without and within but especially from extreme Islam. This definitely doesn’t fit the compromised ideology of the MSM or sorry to say elements within, so they pass by.

  • Lain

    The media would view an attack on Pope Francis as an attack on a public figure. They wouldn’t be interested in it as an attack on a Christian. The Coptic Pope isn’t a celebrity here in the West, so the media aren’t overly interested. The death of Christians goes unreported every day.

  • John

    Perhaps the media silence can be best explained by the obvious fact that this cleric is not homosexual or transgender.

  • Andrew Holt

    No mystery, your Grace, but a theologically ignorant media pandering to a theologically thick general public. Simple!

    • john in cheshire

      The media is willfully ignorant; they don’t want to know otherwise they’d have take sides and possibly write something truthful about islam and Christianity.

  • Dolphinfish

    Well, if we’re doing the whole “Christians United” thing, we might start by refraining from using the massacre of Copts as a segue into venal little spitball salvos against the Catholic Church’s claims of universal authority. I’m sure the Pope of Rome’s grief is no less than the owner of this blog’s.

    • bluedog

      Looking hard for insult where there is none, surely.

    • CliveM

      A slightly paranoid response don’t you think?

  • Inspector General

    One wonders how many Western journalists are on the ground in muslim majority places like Egypt. One can imagine some hapless hack begging his editor on his knees to spare him such a descent into these man made hells. It could be construed at an Employment Tribunal as a gross breach of health and safety. Or at least, it damn well should be.

    • Manfarang

      Western journalists are refused entry at the airport whether they want to go there or not.

      • bluedog

        If they get through immigration they are escorted to a correctional facility, there to remain until released on payment of a substantial donation to the authorities.

        • Manfarang

          The three-month state of emergency imposed after the April 9th church bombing grants the government power to review and censor all local media reports before publication, and to confiscate newspapers deemed to be in violation of the law, the independent outlet Mada Masr reported. Already, al-Bawaba has reported that authorities twice this week seized physical copies of its newspaper. The paper, which has traditionally been pro-government, did not say why the copies were confiscated.

  • Dreadnaught

    Why report this while you can report at length, the brave woman muslima (standing next to a Rozzer)and smiling benignly at a bated EDL marcher her sister had been prviously screaming at. She even had a dedicated interview replete with the usual snide remarks about knckle dragging neanderthal white men. Thanks BBC

    • Inspector General

      That was no rozzer, that was Chris Tarrant.

      • Dreadnaught

        Did you see all the muslim boy racers in their gaudy autos pretending to be paying their respects to the dead policeman on Westminster bridge. Bastards.

        • Mike Stallard

          Muslims are getting so vulnerable now. I am reading 2084 by Boualem Sansal. It takes the lid off Islam. And let us make no mistake, we are light years away from the tolerance and pain suffered by the Prophet while he was in Mecca before the hejira.

          • Dreadnaught

            He was no prophet. Just a thuggish lunatic who got lucky.

          • Inspector General

            The most unpleasant thing about him was how well he fitted in with people of his race, whose descendants we fear today.

          • Dreadnaught

            Religion is not a race, the Christians, Jews and the rest were of his ‘people ‘ too dont forget.

          • Inspector General

            You’ll have to forgive an old Inspector, Dredders. Every now and then, he starts to believe there are differences in the way the races conduct themselves whereas of course there are none. None at all. Nothing. In fact, as the song goes, the sooner we all jump into a f_____g melting pot and turn coffee coloured, the better…

          • Anton

            Of course there are differences in the way different races conduct themselves. But you have to ask themselves if it is due to differences in what they believe or differences in their genes. God tells us it is not the latter; that’s good enough for me to believe the former is the explanation.

          • Inspector General

            You tell yourself it’s not the latter. God is moot on the subject.

          • “God is moot on the subject.”
            More of your “higher understanding”, Inspector? Never mind what scripture says.

          • Inspector General

            Think he’s rather keeping quiet about it all to save disappointment in him. There are plenty who would condemn the Almighty and do. Dare one suggest many in the CoE…

          • God’s hardly silent on the matter.

            God’s word is very clear in telling us that all men are can be a children of God, receiving the full inheritance of heaven no matter what their age, colour, ethnicity, gender or nationality.

            “So God created mankind in his own image, in the image of God he created them; male and female he created them.”
            (Genesis 1:27)

            “May the nations be glad and sing for joy, for you rule the peoples with equity and guide the nations of the earth.”
            (Psalm 67:4)

            “When a foreigner resides among you in your land, do not mistreat them. The foreigner residing among you must be treated as your native-born. Love them as yourself, for you were foreigners in Egypt. I am the LORD your God.”
            (Leviticus 19:33-34)

            “Then Peter began to speak: “I now realize how true it is that God does not show favouritism but accepts from every nation the one who fears him and does what is right. ” “
            (Acts 10:34-35)

          • Inspector General

            “God allowed the races to select their favoured genes, literally, by selection. He allowed thousands of generations of sub Saharan Africans to only allow warriors to mount the maidens. And as a result of it all, their males were among the fiercest, cruellest and most violent of all men that walk the earth. Such is the way of the Lord as he indulges in his creation” (Inspector 2017)

          • Inspector General

            “Hapless Jack sought out the Inspector. He knelt before him and said ‘permission to speak, sir’. The Inspector beckoned him on and Jack said ‘surely it cannot be as you say it is Inspector. For it isn’t fair. It just isn’t’. And the Inspector placed his hand on Jack’s shoulder and said ‘Jack, who is hapless, though art a stubborn arse. And thick with it too. Free yourself of your precious preconceptions and take it all as it is. For lo, it is as the Inspector said it is.”. And Jack fell onto his face, and his mouth kissed the dust, and he wept. He was always weeping, was Jack. For he was hapless and thick with it too.” (Inspector 2017)

          • bluedog

            Shaping up nicely, IG. Will you be offering further insights in a similar vein? The Inspector’s Ten Commandments, for example?

          • Inspector General

            And the Inspector said unto the throng “seize the blue dog and circumcise it”. And it was done.

          • bluedog

            The Inspector is merciful. Castration seemed more likely.

          • Inspector General

            Ah, there you are, old friend. The Inspector was just trying out his new found biblical authority. You can blame Jack for that. Works rather well, don’t you think! Anyway, one hopes your ‘little fella’ heals up after the so many months it will take for a chap of your age, and that it may even fully function again.

            By the way, you shall be spared our game of ‘”fetch” for the duration…

          • Merchantman

            If the garden of equality is a rose scented paradise with the arrival of so many new entrants why does Pope Francis still have his Switzers?
            Personally I think it is because he realises it’s a darned sight more dangerous now so many of the RoP fellas have barged their way in.
            At least Peter took his sword to Gethsemane as a precaution and although Jesus deemed it inappropriate he did say a sword might come in handy in future.
            My belief is the future is here and now.
            To see the Coptic Pope escaping down the street unguarded does worry me.
            Martyrdom is all very well but isn’t it time to get real and have some awareness and hence coptic papal guards. I am not sure whether it’s an umbrella or a ‘Browning 1911 .45’ in the old man’s left hand?

          • carl jacobs

            Think he’s rather keeping quiet about it all to save disappointment in him.

            Do you have any idea how fundamentally pagan that statement is?

          • Inspector General

            I say, Cranmer! Jacobs is back. What shall we do?

          • carl jacobs

            Sending me money is always a good plan. Preferably with kind with more than one trailing zero printed on the paper.

          • Inspector General

            Your accusations are highly ironic as the Inspector will die as he lived, a God fearing taig. As far as he knows, he is the only regular contributor here who scorns such man made attributes of God as infinite love and mercy and the like.

            At the end, we will be judged. It’s either thumbs up or thumbs down as Jesus said. And don’t think your Calvinist rot of pre-destination will put you in a special class. You’ll be in the same line as the rest of us.

          • As far as he knows, he is the only regular contributor here who scorns such man made attributes of God as infinite love and mercy and the like.

            Didn’t I read somewhere in the Bible that God is love? Obviously not. Forget I mentioned it.

          • Inspector General

            Let’s sing Kumbaya together, MM. It might help you.

          • Try that on when you stand before Christ – as we all surely will.
            What’s made you so bitter with life, Inspector?

          • Inspector General

            Bitter? Not at all. Possession of the Higher Knowledge is inspiring, dear fellow. It is reassuring, no less. From it, we know exactly where we stand in our Creator’s plan. It’s the sharp end, in case you haven’t twigged…in fact, for all the praying for peace on this earth, we never had a chance. The Almighty saw to that.

          • carl jacobs

            So I’ll take that as a “No”. You don’t understand the pagan nature of your ideas about God. All pagans reduce God to a creature and thus collapse the distance between creator & creation. You see, it’s only a man who would ever worry about disappointing another. The idea is inconceivable when applied to God – who knows the end from the beginning because He determined the end from the beginning. The god you present is a sort of Christianized version of Zeus. It has nothing to do with the God who made the Earth beneath your feet.

          • carl jacobs

            Ill take that as a “No” then. You do not understand that your conception of God is fundamentally pagan. All pagans reduce God to a creature in his own creation. They thus collapse the distance between Creator and creature – and especially the distance between God & man. That’s what you do when you say that God would stay silent to avoid disappointing another. Only a man would worry about such a thing. The idea is incomprehensible when applied to God – who knows the end from the beginning because he determines the end from the beginning. How can He worry when He is not contingent?

            The god you present is a sort of Christianized version of Zeus. It bears no relationship to the God who made the Earth beneath your feet.

          • Inspector General

            My dear fellow, the God this man recognises is the God who has created a mankind of various traits of good and evil. If that bothers you, take it up with God.

          • God endowers men with different attributes, certainly, and distributes different gifts and graces to each, according to His purpose and according to His foreknowledge of how we will use them or not. He didn’t “create” anyone with evil traits; we do that ourselves.

            God knows (and thus determines) the end from the beginning and does so in a way that we can scarcely comprehend. Take, for example, 1 Kings 22. Here we learn that God has ordained that Ahab be killed in battle as punishment for his wickedness. The whole thing turns on God’s knowledge that Ahab is so full of himself he will march straight into defeat with both eyes open. The irony is that the archer who slays Ahab draws his bow “at random”. So was the death of Ahab due to divine design, human choice or random chance? The answer to all three questions is “Yes”.

            One would have thought your “higher understanding” would have grasped all this.

          • Sarky

            Im sure there is something in bible about false idols i.e. creating a god in your own image??

          • Anton

            We all have the same ancestors.

            I will add that races which go in for first cousin marriage do have various impairments due to genetics, but if they cease the practice then they revert to genetic health as good as everybody else in one generation.

          • Anton

            I don’t fear Muslims.

            I dislike Islam and I wish to offer Christ to Muslims (with the option for them to say No).

          • Inspector General

            You are then sir, the bravest of the brave. The most fearless of the fearless. You are also typing this evening behind a locked door…

          • Manfarang

            Clearly you never set foot in the Middle East.

          • Manfarang

            You can offer it as much as you like but few Muslims will be interested.
            In the Middle East I was often asked why I wasn’t a Muslim since I didn’t drink or eat meat of any kind.

          • Anton

            Who accepts it is up to God and in him I trust.

          • Manfarang

            Not so many atheists in Muslim countries.

          • Rhoda

            But there are many people seeking God hence the unprecedented numbers now turning to Christ in many Muslim nations
            See;
            http://windinthehouse.org/

          • Watchman

            The die was cast long before
            “Genesis 16:11-12 HCSB
            Then the Angel of the Lord said to her (Hagar): You have conceived and will have a son. You will name him Ishmael, for the Lord has heard your cry of affliction. This man will be like a wild donkey. His hand will be against everyone, and everyone’s hand will be against him; he will live at odds with all his brothers. …

            Seems to describe them perfectly.

          • betteroffoutofit

            … that wasn’t luck, though! It was help from the Enemy.

  • Mike Stallard

    Victimisation (the crusades) leads to dehumanisation (Christians = subhumans destined for Hell) leads to extermination (bombs and murder in church of all places). I got this from Rabbi Jonathan Sacks in “Not in God’s Name.” Jews know all about this kind of thing. Now the Middle Eastern historic branch of the Catholic Church knows it too.

    • Manfarang

      The Copts have known about it since Byzantine times.

      • Mike Stallard

        Dammit! You are right!

    • novellus

      The Quran leads to dehumanisation of Non Muslims. No victimisation needed, the words in that book are enough to feed on. Read Surah 98,6, where it says “Indeed, they who disbelieved (did not accept Islam when told about it) among the People of the Scripture (Jews and Christians) and the polytheists (e.g. Hindus, Animists, others) will be in the fire of Hell, abiding eternally therein. Those are the worst of creatures”. Contrast this with the Nazi like elevation of Muslims to “Ubermensch” status in Surah 3,110: “You are the best nation produced [as an example] for mankind”.

      • Mike Stallard

        I am horrified to read “2084” by Boualem Sansal. At first I thought that he was a lousy writer. Then I realised that his hero – Ati – is deliberately kept from any kind of history, any kind of thought, any kind of common sense by Abilang – the language he is forced to speak. No word has more than three letters. Everything – everything – he does is a criminal offence which, if he is not careful, ends up in the stadium. Everything he does is a sin against Yolah whose messenger, Abi, produced the Gkabul – the infallible book. He is pretty sure that Abi is still alive, but ailing. He visits the Abigov where the people who run the show live. Their lives contrast starkly with the poverty and drought of the rest of his world. Even the river is diverted to their luxurious compound. If Boualem is right, then Islam is a very serious problem and, actually, I think it is not far off the mark. A religion of sheer fear with the occasional flash of divine sunshine.

        • bluedog

          Did you say the Bishop of Norwich stood you down when you were an Anglican priest?

          • Mike Stallard

            I didn’t actually – but that is what happened in 1989 when I was interviewed by the EDP (newspaper) about my views on the ordination of women. All water under the bridge now.

          • betteroffoutofit

            That’s very interesting . . . as long ago as 1989!!!

            As to the Mozzie Threat, I guess Barnsley and Harrogate (for example) haven’t suffered quite as badly as Dewsbury and Bradford (and I notice Dr. N. seldom acknowledges the problem).

            Islam ain’t lookin’ pretty anywhere, though – especially when those lurid silken garbs stride over the moors. The very countryside seems to reject them. So I pray:-
            Breath of God, and Light of the Son, guide the Soul of Thine Own Country to thrive with Thee … not with the Adversary.

        • Anton

          Try Michel Houellebecq’s novel “Submission” for something a lot more plausible and nearer in time.

          • Mike Stallard

            I have heard of this book and, thanks to your recommendation, will buy it. Thanks for the tip.

  • Holger

    The media hasn’t mentioned this Tawadross character because it neither knows nor cares who he is, and neither does its audience.

    Christians may be obsessed with clerical rank and pre-eminence. The rest of us have better things to think of.

    This attack was widely covered in the French press, but I don’t remember seeing anything about a Coptic pope. Why would I? What makes popes of any description important to the population of a secular republic? A priest is a priest whatever jumped-up name he gives himself. Priests are of interest only to Christians. And Christians don’t buy enough newpapers or click on enough links to be of interest to anyone as a potentially profitable market.

    • Anton

      Priests might be of interest only to Christians, but Islamic terror attacks are of interest to residents of Paris, are they not?

    • Royinsouthwest

      I thought the idea of a “secular republic” was that it would be neutral in religious matters, not anti-religious. Of course, that is just the theory. Even the most cursory study of the French Revolution would show otherwise.

      • Holger

        A secular republic tolerates the practice of all religions as long as those who practice them do not interfere with the freedoms of other citizens.

        Practice your faith in private and the republic will leave you alone. Try to foist it on others and the authorities will step in and stop it.

        • Lucius

          “A secular republic tolerates the practice of all religions as long as those who practice them do not interfere with the freedoms of other citizens.”
          ******************************************************************************************
          In America, we call this the “right to be left alone.” It’s a negative right, meaning that it commands the government what it cannot do. But this is not what the non-religious left wants at all. What they really want is nothing less than moral superiority and a complete abolish of the millenniums old moral order. Case in point is the LGBT movement in America. Although enjoying equal rights under law, the LGBT movement is now using the law to foist (as you say) its brand of morality on others with the express purpose of forcing Christian individuals and institutions to both accommodate and validate their particular moral worldview or risk banishment from the public square. For example, a cake bakery, owned and operated by devout Christians, I believe in the city of Denver, was sued out of existence because the cake bakers politely declined to participate in a gay wedding ceremony. Denver is a large city, so there were numerous other cake bakeries. This bakery was deliberately targeted for banishment. A similar case exists against a wedding photographer. I suspect in the next 15 years we will see similar cases employed against private Churches and private Church-run schools. In other words, insofar as the LGBT-movement, it seeks not merely the negative right to be left alone, but also the positive right of employing state action to enforce others to accommodate their new morality.

          So this theory you have that the secular left merely wants to live and let live, or, as you say, to not have people of faith “interfere with the freedoms of other citizens” is not true and you know it. The reality is that the only movement trying to “foist it[self] on others,” at least over the last 15 years or so, is the totalitarians of “tolerance” on the left. Who seek nothing less than the absolute triumph of their moral worldview and the complete banishment of all others, and in particular, the Christian moral worldview.

          • Holger

            The case you refer to was an attempt by a commercial enterprise to deny service on the basis of sexual orientation. This had nothing to do with the private practice of religious beliefs. Commercial enterprises are not private individuals. They are publicly registered companies with a duty to abide by commercial law, which prohibits denial of service based on sexual orientation.

            The owner of that company was quite rightly prosecuted and punished for failure to respect the rules that all companies must comply with.

            Cries of persecution are complete hogwash. This was a cut and dried case of a business owner breaching the law in order to foist his religious views on a couple by denying them service. He is completely free to keep on believing what he believes, but he is not free to ride roughshod over the law of the land in order to impose those beliefs on other people.

            What Christians want is the right not only to hate others – which they already have, of course, – but also to express that hate through legal acts of discrimination. The law does not allow this and Christians are not above the law.

            I don’t know whether this baker had to close down because of this case. It would be a salutary example to other small business owners if he did. Believe what you believe, by all means, but if you try to use your business as a weapon against those you hate, you’ll be stopped and may lose your livelihood as a result.

        • Anton

          Just like the French authorities are doing *such* a rigorous job of stepping in against the religion whose adherents are responsible for multiple terrorist atrocities there recently.

    • Lucius

      Obviously, you felt burned at some point by a Christian individual, the Church, or Christianity itself. Otherwise, you would not have this constant chip on your shoulder. So come on, out with it. You enjoy the relative anonymity of the internet.

      • Holger

        I have no particular grievance against any individual Christian. I wasn’t abused or maltreated at school. No priest or nun ever laid a hand on me. Boredom is the worst punishment I ever endured at the hands of the Church. So I don’t know what this “chip” is supposed to be.

        On second thoughts, I do. It’s part of the standard Christian modus operandi to attack its enemies by impugning their impartiality or assigning neurotic motives to them. Anyone who disputes the authority of Christ must be characterised as damaged or mad in some way. The alternative, which is to admit they’re equal human beings with the full use of all their faculties, would be to admit that perfectly sane, balanced, happy and reasonable people can reject your religion, which undermines your ability to proclaim it as undisputed truth.

        It’s all part of your omnipotence delusion. If I question you, I must be unbalanced in some way. A Christian must have caused me so much pain that I’m consumed by the desire to punish all Christians.

        Sorry to disappoint you, but my problem with Christianity is due to the malignant nature of the philosophy. It has nothing to do with individual Christians, although I note how it twists you and makes you behave in the cruel and profoundly disdainful way you do. By all means try to play the same trick on me as men have been playing on women for generations. Try to dismiss me as damaged and neurotic. It won’t work. Only those who share your delusions will fall for it. Others will see it as one more example of why Christians should be approached with great caution as the inveterate liars and manipulators their religion turns them into.

        • Lucius

          What Christian is “attacking” you? Is it the fact that you choose to come on a Christian comment board, toss out hyper-critical and often unsubstantiated positions, and meet resistance to your ideas? Is that the “attacking,” which concerns you? Is it the fact that Christians collectively reject some or all or your particular moral worldview? The undercurrent of sheer spitefulness in your comment history on this board leads me to believe that at some level you harbor deep doubts and uncertainty about your own moral positions and lifestyle. This deep self-doubt explains the type of lashing out I see in your comment history. People who are confident in their own faith and morality do not engage in this type of behavior. And finally, the irony of your crowing about Christianity “attack[ing] its enemies” and your regular posts that are replete with nothing but ridicule, scorn, and debasement of the Faith is not lost on me.

  • David

    Your Grace, there is no mystery in this ‘radio’ silence whatsoever.
    With very few honourable exceptions, the western press are only interested in drawing attention to the multicultural, liberal (new definition) causes that they choose to project onto the public, and thereby propagate. They are totally ignorant of all matters theological, especially outside the west.
    The Daily Mail has written a good, straight and truthful article that gets to the heart of the matter. But I doubt if any other newspaper has written anything that even vaguely hits the mark. From time to time the Daily Telegraph occasionally publishes well researched and thought through articles with a faith component, usually written by Tim Stanley(?), who is a convert to Catholicism I believe. The BBC never fails of course to spit out its anti-western, anti-Christian propaganda.
    But despite this media obfuscation, or worse, the public can ascertain with their own eyes the source of the violence.
    For adhering to their faith, the Copts deserve a very special place of honour in heaven.

    • Manfarang

      If its the kind of “truth” the Daily Mail came out with in the early 1930s then everyone can do without it.

  • Islamists might be politically fractured and theologically fragmented, but they are united in their belief that the Pope must die – that one and this one, along with both the others.

    Pope Francis visits Egypt later this month and will surely be a key target for Islamists.

    • David

      Hhmm. Then I fear that this violence directed against the Coptic Pope could be taken as a signal of their intentions regarding the Catholic one perhaps ? I anticipate possible changes in plans around that proposed visit.

      • Jack’s guess is that Pope Francis will still visit. If he and his security advisers are wise, they will take precautions and review his itinerary. Islamists see him as an enemy and have recently condemned his remarks about Islam and violence.

        • Royinsouthwest

          I would imagine that the Egyptian president will be very anxious to make sure Pope Francis is well protected, as Egyptian presidents have been protected since the assassination of Sadat.

          • bluedog

            That’s where the risk lies, within the Egyptian security detail, as was the case with Sadat.

    • Merchantman

      Indeed and I hope he brings his Switzers with him. See my comments above.

  • To my shame (I suppose) I never heard of Pope Tawadros II in my life before.
    I am glad he is safe and well, but I am more concerned about the 40-odd other Egyptian Christians who died that day. I recognize no popes, since I find none in the word of God. I look forward to the day when the churches are free of such hierarchy.
    ISIS is like some great sea-monster threshing about in its death-agonies. So long as it exists it will keep committing atrocities, not because they help its cause, but because they express its rage. All that can be done is to put the beast out of its misery as quickly as possible by taking Mosul and Raqqa. A caliphate can only exist while it occupies land. Take away the land and, God willing, the violence will slowly come to an end.

    • David

      I’d very much like to agree with you that without territory the violence will stop, but surely the ideology will continue ?

      • Only time will tell, but I have read that ISIS have a quite detailed eschatology that involves all the infidels coming against the True Believers in a great battle in Iraq and being defeated, and then the end comes. If ISIS is destroyed , its teaching is proved false and many of its supporters may melt away (DV).

        • David

          Yes time will tell. But meanwhile only God knows.

          • Indeed so. But read Psalm 37 for your encouragement.

          • David

            Good choice !
            God bless you.

  • CliveM

    In fairness it has to be said that his post highlights the vacuous self interest of the sort of secularism Linus represents. Selfish, shallow, not interested in cause and effect, simply interested in “does it effect me”.

    • Jon of GSG

      Well yes, I suppose that’s the thing. Why report facts without the reasons behind them? I remember a work-experience girl I had a couple of years ago from Aix-en-Provence who remarked that the French love their “faits divers” as part of their news diet, which is pretty much what you describe, and makes as little sense as you say!

  • bluedog

    The name Dina Habib Powell may be relevant to the continuing attacks on the Copts. Born in Cairo to a Coptic family that emigrated to the US, M/s Powell is now a member of the Trump cabinet in the capacity of deputy national security adviser. One can imagine that M/s Powell would have an opinion on the recent outrage which she has made known.

    • David

      An interesting, pertinent fact.

    • chefofsinners

      Is she a Beverley Hills Copt?

  • dannybhoy

    Here’s part of the problem. Muslim extremism/Jihadism has spread throughout the West. This Muslim lady lives in the United States. She sees no incongruity in calling for destruction of Coptic Christians whilst enjoying the freedoms and benefits of living in um, the greatest Christian country in the world.
    Watch the vid here…

    • Lucius

      Her shadowy conspiracy theory-ridden blame of the tiny Coptic Christian minority as nefariously manipulating Muslim Egypt has familiar echoes of another tiny minority religious community that was the subject of various shadowy conspiracies in Germany circa the 1930s. Very troubling.

      • Manfarang

        Estimations range between 15 to 18 million in Egypt which isn’t tiny.

        • David

          Copts comprise about 10% of the total population I believe.

          • Manfarang

            So I believe. I knew some who were migrant workers when I worked in the Gulf.

        • Lucius

          About 10% of Egypt is Christian, and about half those Christians are Coptic. Not what I would call a sizeable minority.

          • Dominic Stockford

            Operating from your figures:
            Egypt Population – 82 million
            10% – 8.2 million
            Half that, 4.1 million.

            Seems pretty sizeable to me.

          • Lucius

            I’m speaking in relative terms, not absolute terms. But, yes, in absolute terms, of course, 4.1 million is a lot.

    • Report her for hate speech on YouTube. What she is saying about the Coptic Christians is a load of hate fuelling rubbish.

      • Lucius

        I’m fairly sure modern “hate” laws can only benefit and cannot be employed against certain privileged groups.

        • You mean they cannot be employed against muslims? That’s not fair then, where is the equality the liberals are always promoting? It’s non existent really. They’re too cowardly to apply it to muslims. Whimps the lot of them.

  • Lucius

    Perhaps, the Islamic State telegraphed its assassination attempt in the recent issue of Dabiq (titled “Breaking the Cross”) where it listed the Copts as waging war on Islam and no longer enjoying protection under jizyah status (i.e., a special tribute/tax passive non-believers must pay to live unmolested under Islamic law) . Front and center was a picture of Pope Tawadros II of Alexandria. I note that the other Christian leader pictured in the same article and accused of misleading people was the Orthodox Patriarch of Jerusalem, His Most Godly Beatitude, Patriarch Theophilos III. I greatly fear that he may also be targeted. And pray that he and other Christian leaders and places of worship have appropriate security details.

  • novellus

    Western media wants to paint the current Egyptian government as a failure. The same way they denounced it in 2013. Western elites wanted Morsi to stay in power and Obama and Clinton invested a lot in it. Mentioning, maybe even highlighting an attack on the Patriarch of Alexandria would detract from this. Even more, It would direct the focus on religion, and that maybe, just maybe, the attack had something to do with Islam. No way!!!

  • len

    As Islam advances the spirit of death that inhabits radical Islam goes forward now into Europe.This is no longer’ a Middle east problem.’
    The secularist Media does not know how to respond to this death cult as their’ normal rules’ will not apply.

    • David

      The secularist media deny the existence of evil, instead attempting to explain violence in terms of disadvantage or some perceived hardship, yet crimes are often committed by highly educated people.

      • len

        Evil comes from the spiritual into the physical and the secular world stands helpless before it.

        ‘For we wrestle not against flesh and blood, but against principalities, against powers, against the rulers of the darkness of this world, against spiritual wickedness in high places’
        (Ephesians 6:12)

        (‘High places’ are the spiritual voids above countries, cities and communities. Rejecting the God of the Bible has left these high places under the sole authority of wicked spiritual beings)

        • David

          Indeed.

  • Rhoda

    Here is a link to a short worship song(with subtitles) sung by Coptic Christians at the night of prayer for Egypt in 2011. They met at the Cairo’s Cave Church.

    • David

      Thank you Rhoda – beautiful !
      May God bless these brothers and sisters in Christ.

    • ChaucerChronicle

      I thought Barnabus Fund were discredited by their convicted sex assailant, CEO, Dr Patrick Sookhdeo?

      • Anton

        Barnabus is a Christian charity centred around a mission bus in one of England’s major cities. The Barnabas Fund is a Christian charity that aids the persecuted church, especially in Islamic lands. It was led for a long time by Patrick Sookhdeo, a man who has written several fine books about Islam. In the last few years he was convicted of groping a female employee in a her-word-against-mine case. He continues to deny he did it. I have no views on the subject, but you should not let your mind be decided for you by judges or juries. If you are interested, inform yourself as best you can and decide for yourself.

        • DP111

          Rev Patrick Sookhdeo was a marked man the moment he went off the message – “Islam is a Religion of Peace”.

          One way any man can be got at, is for a woman to accuse him of sexual harrassment. The judgement will mostly against the man. It is so predictable that the man’s lawyer will advise the man to either settle out of court, or plead guilty, and avoid a lesser sentence.

        • ChaucerChronicle

          1. If he continues to deny that he committed the crime; he should appeal the verdict.
          2. I was associated with In-Contact Ministries back in the late 70s – mid -1980s; there were allegations in St Andrews church that he had committed a sexual assault on a young woman.
          3. His next trial for sexual assault is at Snaresbrook Crown Court in May. I do hope I shall be a able to meet with people. Will you be there?

          • Anton

            You take a lot on yourself by saying that Sookhdeo “should” appeal against that verdict. Do you know if he has the money (which would be his own, not from Barnabas)? Do you know whether he has decided that he best serves God by getting on with his personal ministry and letting the world think what it likes? Do you know the extent to which one person’s word against another is a lottery in court?

            I don’t know the answer to any of those, for which reason I hold no opinion on what happened, and wouldn’t presume to advise Dr Sookhdeo.

          • ChaucerChronicle

            1. I am sure he has a lot of money from the sale of the vicarage, church hall and grounds (substantial) from the property that was sold in St Andrews Road, London E13 ( you can view it on the Internet).
            2. Was he getting on with his personal ministry by sexually assaulting a woman; tried by a jury; convicted by a judge on the beyond reasonable standard of belief?
            3. At his new criminal trial set for May I am sure he and the world will have a lot to reflect upon; don’t you?

          • Anton

            I don’t know anything about a property sold but was it owned by him personally? If so, he might have made a lot of money but he would appear to have lost his home.

            Certainly I shall follow reports of further trials with interest. Your point 2 implies that you regard him as guilty. That is your privilege, but I shall follow events from the standpoint that I don’t know what happened.

          • ChaucerChronicle

            ‘Your point 2 implies that you regard him as guilty.’

            Of course I do; and thousands of others do too.

            1. The police investigated Sookhdeo.
            2. They concluded he had a case to answer.
            3. The Crown concluded he had a case to answer.
            4. He was tried by a judge and jury.
            5. The jury concluded on the beyond reasonable doubt standard of belief that he was guilty of the allegations put to him.
            6. The judge convicted him.
            7. The judge sentenced him.
            8. He is a convicted sex criminal.

          • Anton

            All of which is true (except I’m unsure whether his trial was before a jury or a judge only). None of which is the point, though. This was a case of one person’s unsupported word against another, with no other evidence. Such trials can easily lead to miscarriages of justice. I have seen it happen (although I was not personally involved). You are free to regard him as guilty. I am free to keep an open mind.

          • ChaucerChronicle

            He was also convicted of witness intimidation – what do you say to that?

            You suggest he may lose his home? Which one?

            Patrick Sookhdeo had worked as a director from the 5th of June 2015 up til the resignation date on the 22nd of November 2015. This managing director had worked in Barnabas Aid International situated at The Old Rectory, River Street, SN9 5DB, in Pewsey. Barnabas Aid International was incorporated on the 24th of December 2013. Dr Patrick Sookhdeo worked with many professionals for example: Colin Johnston (from the 5th of June 2015 to the 22nd of November 2015), Caroline Julia Chenevix Kerslake (from the 5th of June 2015 to the 22nd of November 2015), Rev. Ian Smith Mcnaughton (from the 5th of June 2015 to the 22nd of November 2015), Paul Mursalin (from the 5th of June 2015 to the 22nd of November 2015), Pak Woh Poon (from the 5th of June 2015 to the 22nd of November 2015). Dr Patrick Sookhdeo was appointed to 13 companies. Other director jobs: Servants Fellowship International (5 Robin Hood Lane in Sutton, incorporated on the 16th of July 1979), Barnabas Aid International (The Old Rectory in Pewsey, incorporated on the 24th of December 2013), River Centre Limited (5 Robin Hood Lane in Sutton, incorporated on the 15th of December 2005). We found 213 filings mentioning Patrick, for example the documents filed on: 2nd of April 2015 (termination category), 7th of August 2015 (appointments category), 24th of November 2015 (termination category), 17th of October 2015, 7th of April 2014. Patrick is 70 years old.

          • Anton

            Do you know what properties he owns *personally*? I don’t.

            While on bail he addressed a crowded room that included two employees he had been ordered by a court to have no contact with. That clearly broke the terms of his bail, and goes in the book as intimidation, but it is far from the common usage of the phrase.

            I read, a while ago, the series of articles by Mark Woods critical of Sookhdeo on the Christian Today website. I read also the pro-Sookhdeo Barnabas document, which refers to Woods’ articles and to the matter generally, titled “Hard Pressed on Every Side”. Most of what I know comes from those two sources, although some well-thought-of Christians clearly retain confidence in him, namely Canon Andrew White, Lord Reading, and the fine Baroness Cox:

            https://www.premierchristianradio.com/News/UK/Canon-Andrew-White-joins-Barnabas-Fund-as-Patron

            Beyond that I am not competent to comment and am not going to. I am neither attacking nor defending Dr Sookhdeo. You seem to want to attack him. That’s your business.

          • ChaucerChronicle

            It appears Sookhdeo has made an application to the Court of Appeal so his impending trial at Snaresbrook Crown Court is delayed.

            Presumambly, then, he does have the money.

            Now the Court of Appeal is not going to overturn a finding of fact by a jury. Then all that’s left is finding fault on a technicality. My understanding is that the Court of Appeal could increase the original sentence handed down by the judge.

            The next trial for the allegations relating to 1977 is merely delayed. From the alleged victim’s point of view: justice delayed is justice denied.

            Isn’t that so?

      • Rhoda

        Egyptian President Abdel-Fattah El-Sisi orders the opening of military hospitals to treat those ‎injured in the Tanta attack, according to Sky News Arabia
        and
        The Egyptian presidency has announced three days of national mourning in light of the attacks.

        from Ahram online

  • Jon Sorensen

    Typical media. Just like media is pretty much silent that San Bernardino school shooter was a Christian pastor…

    • DP111

      Ah yes, that Christian pastor. I remember it well. He was screaming something about “Jesus is Lord.. “., as he blasted away.

      • Jon Sorensen

        He was doing God’s work I guess

    • len

      Anderson was able to put’ a veneer of normality’ over a very troubled individual inside.Tragic case.

    • novellus

      never heard before that the profession or religion of a person who perpetrated a “family tragedy”, for that is what it was, was of any interest to the media. The only speciality was that because it took place in a school the perpetrator and his estranged wife (the only one he wanted to kill) were not the only ones killed.

      • Jon Sorensen

        Media is interested if perpetrator is non-Christian or LGBT. Christianity gets a free pass.

        • novellus

          You live in a dreamworld. Media is interested if perpetrator is non-Christian? Maybe only to reiterate that the evil deed had nothing to do with his religion, despite the fact that perpetrator explicitly states that very thing.

          • Jon Sorensen

            You live in a Christian bubble wearing Christian lenses and you immediately have to jump and defend “nothing to do with his religion”. Just like religion of peace member always tell us terrorism has “nothing to do with his religion”. Break your bubble….

          • Anton

            Have you read any ISIS propaganda recently?

          • Jon Sorensen

            Yep. Just like Christians isn’t it 🙂

          • novellus

            Hahaha…. You did even confuse my posting. Read again the sentence with “nothing to do with his religion”, notice something? I did not mean the shooter in Calif. but criticised what the media say when Muslims go on a killing spree, despite those Muslims telling loudly that they do it for Allah and Islam. But of course the statement was a defensive one for the perpetrator of the San Bernardino shooting. And by the way, what must go on in a person commenting on an article about Muslims bombing Christian churches that you must immediately jump on saying how bad Christians are and how much the media protects them (despite the fact that in reality they are always throwing verbal stones at them)? Did you grow up in a pious environment and deserted? That would explain a lot…

          • Jon Sorensen

            “go on in a person commenting on an article about Muslims bombing Christian churches that you must immediately jump on saying”
            Yeah… providing a counterpoint is so terrible for you. In your bubble everyone must and will agree with your view point. Break the bubble already.

    • Anton

      If he was a pastor, can you name the congregation he supposedly pastored? That is the only legitimate use of the word in the Christian context.

    • carl jacobs

      He was also a former Veteran. What’s your point? That Christians do evil things? There is a shock. But if we do something evil, then all you have to is condemn us by our own Book. Does Christianity countenance a man shooting his wife, along with two children who just happen to be there, and then killing himself? No.

      So exactly what logical fallacy are you pushing here?

      • Jon Sorensen

        “Does Christianity countenance a man shooting his wife, along with two children who just happen to be there, and then killing himself? No.”
        You are wrong. It’s the right thing to do if God asks you to do it. Remember Abraham. Maybe God wanted to make a covenant with His pastor?

        “So exactly what logical fallacy are you pushing here?”
        LOL. You bias is so beautiful!

        • carl jacobs

          So then we’ll just call it “guilt by association”, shall we? And now you’ve thrown in a non sequitur just for fun I suppose. It’s ever so much easier than making a coherent argument.

          You can laugh at my bias again if it makes you feel better.

          • Jon Sorensen

            Its not “guilt by association”, just information about the person, just like media and Christians tells when a criminal was muslim, buddhist or atheist…

          • carl jacobs

            I’m not sure what alternative media universe you inhabit but I haven’t found any trouble finding that piece of information. The first mention I saw was in the LA Times. In the US that’s what we call the MSM. Far more interesting to me is the complete lack of any detail surrounding the claim. A minister ordained where? When? In what church did he serve?

            And please, Jon. Don’t give me this soft shuffle about how your post was only about information. That wasn’t the point of your post. Anyone who has read this weblog longer than a week knows that. Don’t you have the courage to say what you really meant?

  • DP111

    Its an Islamic doctrine to attack non-Muslim places of worship, particularly on their important festival events.

    Thus attacks on Hindu temples take place on Diwali. On Christians, at Christmas, Easter and Palm Sunday. It is to show contempt of non-Muslims.

    And of there is any attempt to question this in the West, it will be deemed Islamophobic and racist.

    The New Stockholm Syndrome

    Plenty more, as well as the Religion of Peace website, and on Ali Sena’s website.

    • Dreary Steeple

      So better lie low this Easter Sunday then.

      • DP111

        It will come to that in England as well. No reason why England will be an exception.

  • chefofsinners

    Oh shut up whingeing Cranmer. Don’t you care that here has been an Islamist attack in our friendly EU partner state Germany! The target was A FOOTBALL TEAM! Deaths, er…none BUT A PLAYER BROKE HIS WRIST! Many, many column inches are required to analyse the sheer horror… did you know that the match had to be delayed by 24 hours??? Good, now we’ve sorted out our priorities everything feels comfortable again.

  • DP111

    Last week was a fairly typical one in 21st century headlines:

    ~On Monday, 14 victims were killed in an Islamic terrorist attack on the St Petersburg Metro;

    ~On Friday, four victims were killed in an Islamic terrorist attack by a homicidal truck driver on Queen Street in Stockholm;

    ~On Palm Sunday, at least 45 victims were killed in an Islamic terrorist attack on two Coptic churches in Egypt.

    https://www.steynonline.com/7751/the-incoming-roar

    • Lucius

      To quote the American comedian Bill Maher: “When there are this many bad apples, it starts raising questions about the orchard.”

      • DP111

        True. Its not just the orchard but the DNA of the seed. Kill the Kuffar is in the DNA of Islam.

  • Eihab Saeed

    That is a very interesting article, thank you Archbishop Cranmer

  • DP111

    Churches in Southern Egypt Will Not Celebrate Easter.

    That was precisely the purpose of the attack. To stop non-Muslim festivals, and to show that Islam will not tolerate any other religion. Non-Muslims must stop all their Kuffar nonsense. .

    In India, Muslim attacks come in at Diwali. Muslim attacks on churches come in at Christmas, Palm Sunday and Easter.

  • Typhoon Tina

    The question you should be asking yourselves is why did the neocons decide to oust the three secularist leaders in the ME, Saddam, Gadaffi and Assad, who protected Christians and other minority groups from the Islamic crazies?

    • carl jacobs

      Because one of those crazy secular leaders was trying to make himself the nuclear hegemon over the Middle East. Now if you are a European you will likely say “So what? That’s a problem for the Americans. Why do you think we keep them around?” But if you are an American, then you know that what’s presently going on in the Middle East is a girl scout camp-out compared to the alternative.

      • novellus

        They were also the list of the seven countries to be taken out in 5 years Wesley Clarke talked about. Coincidence? Obama followed GWB’s path of regime change and interventions. Remember also how passionately he and Clinton wanted to keep the MuslimBrotherhood in power in Egypt.
        And I wonder who you think wanted t make himself nuclear hegemon. After the Israelis destroyed Osirak reactor Saddam was out of that play. Maybe you mean Iran, but then Obama even helped them instead of hindering them, and Iran is not secular regime.

        • carl jacobs

          Don’t be willfully obtuse. Osirak was 20 years removed.

          The lesson Hussein drew from the First Gulf War was that he should have waited until he had nuclear weapons. He was right in that. If Hussein had nukes he would still be in power and he would still be in Kuwait.

          The Second Gulf War was above all else a preventive war of nuclear risk mitigation. That was the strategic imperative behind the American action. If the war hadn’t been fought in 2003 then when should it have been fought? Because it absolutely had to be fought.

          • novellus

            Sorry, but the WMDs of Saddam were a fabricated story, almost no one in the world believes that anymore. Have you listened to Wesley Clarke’s video? He said that the Pentagon spoke about going to war against Iraq just after 9/11 and no one could give a reason for that, so that Clarke concludes that “we have a hammer so we must find something that looks like a nail”. So. it was premeditated regime change as part of the 7 countries in 5 years plan and had nothing to do with any threat that Saddam made.

    • Jon of GSG

      It wasn’t just those three though, was it? The only place where the Arab Spring really came to fruition was in Tunisia, where a secularist leader was got rid of and now the new government also pledges (and acts) to protect religious minorities from extremists.

      • Royinsouthwest

        Tunisia is the exception that proves the rule (using “prove” in the saying’s old fashioned sense of “testing”) but, alas. did not become the rule. Western politicians, like Cameron, and most of the media, showed great naivety in their backing for the Arab Spring which has turned into an Islamic Winter.

    • David

      Christians are of no importance to the politicians who control the west. They defend multiculturalism and relativism, which pretends that all religions are of equal value. Laws have been created to enforce this situation. Even immigration into the US, at least under Obama, massively favoured Muslims over Christians. The election of Trump is the first sign that the west’s cultural self-destruction may be changing.

      • 1649again

        It’s all about money David.

        • David

          Yes, money is a large part of it I agree. But also the ideologically driven left-liberals have worked to replace Christianity, as the source of our laws and culture, with secularism.

    • 1649again

      Saudi and Gulf State money have corrupted the Western Elite which has sold its soul to Mammon and atheism.

    • len

      It was perceived by western leaders that if these three tyrants( Saddam, Gadaffi and Assad,)were removed then the move by a section of Arabs towards democracy could be encouraged and possibly come about.Also there was a very real fear of any of these tyrants going nuclear or getting/using chemical weapons. The Arab spring was perceived as a very real possibility of democracy coming to the middle east..It was an enormous gamble which didn’t take into account the real situation on the ground which was the huge groundswell of Islamic fundamentalists wishing to take over and create a Caliphate.Egypt narrowly a complete take over by the Muslim Brotherhood only stopped by a strong army with good leadership.

      • Anton

        I’d add that party democracy works only where all parties agree in advance to abide by the results of elections, and that where you don’t have this you can’t have democracy. It seemed obvious to me that Arab countries didn’t have such internal consensus, but then I don’t have the great resources of intelligence of the State Department.

        I agree that it is cock-up over conspiracy as the cause in this case.

    • David

      I’d further add that the Conservative manifesto even stated that they would bring more of the very threatened Christians here as refugees. That promise has not been honoured. A mere 1% of those accepted from Syria and Iraq are Christian. The UK is part of a secularist Europe determined to undermine the historic faith that created it.

    • Ivan M

      One word – Israel. I’m savvy with all the convoluted theories concerning democracies, secularism, humanism, etc. But if one is looking for final causes in the spirit of Aristotle, then my answer is the only one left standing. Good thing Christians in the West are fine with sacrificing the Middle-Eastern Christians for the sake of Zion. Where will we be without such Christians?

      • Anton

        Do explain the reasoning. One word does not make it clear.