Mrs Proudie
Meditation and Reflection

Mrs Proudie: War in Europe and First Minister Krankie's 'Named Person' scheme

 

Goodness! In light of the Prime Minister’s warnings of world-wide conflagration should we dare to sever links with the Zollverein, the Archdeacon has taken it upon himself to recruit and organise Barchester’s very own home guard. So far he has.. ahem.. persuaded the gentlemen of Hiram’s Hospital to fall in line, and Bertie Stanhope said he would if the uniform was dazzling enough and displayed his manly physique to best effect. Mr. Slope immediately produced a tape measure and offered to check Bertie’s inside leg – he’s so helpful (and quick off the mark). I’m not sure the Archdeacon is of a military mien, but one qualification stands out – he can bellow for Britain. The troop mustered on Cloister Green yesterday and I went to watch. The Archdeacon waved his grandfather’s sword about quite professionally, but alas the gentlemen were somewhat ill-equipped. Mr. Bunce strapped a colander to his head with string; Job Skulpit presented arms with a hoe; Spriggs and Moody had no weapons to speak of but managed to look fierce, and Jonathan Crumple showed what he could do with a pair of shears. Brave lads each and every one of them… but their efforts were as preposterous as the Prime Minister’s claim. I do hope the man is seeing his physician. Regularly.

I sat with Mr. Harding on Monday afternoon discussing the Jupiter article on the London Mayoral election. One is baffled, certainly, why London has a Lord Mayor and a Mayor, which seems an embarrassment of riches, but I digress.

“What will happen to music when the Mohammedans seize power Mrs. Proudie,” asked Mr. Harding, his voice trembling with emotion.

I took a deep breath: “I fear it will be abolished, along with art, philosophy and huge swathes of literature and Ant and Dec. People forget that in 1789, the majority of Frenchmen wanted to reform, not destroy the monarchy, setting out laws that recognised people’s rights. The Jacobins and fervent revolutionaries were in a minority, yet this radical minority seized power and unleashed the Terror. Moderate citizens were cowed. It is a pattern the world has, and will. see again and again.’

“Then we are doomed, Mrs. P,” said Mr. H.

“We always were. Do help yourself to hobnobs.”

A domestic snippet: my Lord the Bishop is never one to make objection (I don’t let him as a rule) but he took me by surprise at supper on Tuesday. I had instructed cook to find something delectable from Monsieur Escoffier’s book of recipes, and waited expectantly for the compliments.

“GARLIC! Are you mad? For goodness sake my dear, we are not savages!” he spluttered.

My word… my Lord the Bishop has a spine. Oh well, back to Mrs. Beaton and suet.

The Jupiter reports disturbing developments north of the border, where Scottish police are busy turning themselves into legions of little prodnoses, poking into everybody’s business. Why, a photograph of a dog raising its paw was deemed ‘offensive’ and resulted in the owners arrest… what would have been the response had it cocked its leg up I wonder? I also understand children are now placed under the watchful eye of a state-appointed Inquisitor who can override the wishes of parents at the drop of a hat. First Minister Krankie is a sinister besom and no mistake. This does not seem British to me – more like the secret police of Tsarist Russia.

My scribblings are somewhat light this week as I have had a funeral to arrange. I hope my friends understand. I shall look forward to next week and brighter days. Adieu xx

  • Rhoda
    • IanCad

      To Arms!!

      • Politically__Incorrect

        … sharpening my garden shears as we speak…

        • IanCad

          Careful there PI. H&SE better not hear about that. The Anti-Terrorism Taskforce may have you in their sights as well.
          Wet noodles, handbags, maybe a little shouting. That’s about it. Lord help us if we ever have a conflict that requires all hands on deck.

  • Eustace

    Alan Rickman had designs on Peter Blythe’s inside leg?

    Well there you go! I had no idea he swung both ways. It’s getting quite tedious all this constant emendation of our official list of LGBT heroes. We keep having to add name after name. We’ll run off the end of the parchment soon.

    What about you, Miss McEwan? Now that you’re speaking to us from beyond the grave, can you confirm the rumours that have circulated for years about the BBC’s feminazi lesbian casting couch? What exactly were you trying to hide under that crinoline?

    • CliveM

      LOL, you just couldn’t resist!

      • It’s our ‘friend’. All doubt removed.

    • “It’s getting quite tedious all this constant emendation of our official list of LGBT heroes.”

      Eustace, you a member of the LGBT fraternity. Which particular one? Gay, Bi or Trans? Do tell.

      • William Lewis

        One shudders to think what one has to do to get on the official list of LGBTXYZ heroes.

        • Note, it is now “our” official list.

        • Pubcrawler

          Do you actually have to do anything, or can you just self-identify?

          • William Lewis

            Actually, I’m an LGBTXYX hero! Get over it!

          • Pubcrawler

            Oi! Find your own ‘safe space’!

      • Eustace

        I’m gay. I’m not a lesbian. Nor am I bisexual or transgender. But I know lots of people who are…

        • A homosexual, eh? How interesting. Are you ‘married’ or single?

      • Anton

        Washington to tell the States of the Union to let children into whichever toilet or changing room they wish or lose federal funding:

        https://www.washingtonpost.com/politics/obama-administration-to-instruct-schools-to-accommodate-transgender-students/2016/05/12/0ed1c50e-18ab-11e6-aa55-670cabef46e0_story.html

        How many unscrupulous boys will now get changed (clothes, that is) in the girls changing room?

        • Uncle Brian

          All of them, I expect.

    • The Explorer

      A risky nomenclature to adopt. Look what happened to Eustace in ‘The Voyage of the Dawn Treader’.

      • Eustace

        I don’t read C.S. Lewis. Mawkish crypto-Christian silliness for brainwashing children into believing in religion.

        • The Explorer

          You’re really getting into the role: that’s exactly the sort of thing the unregenerate Eustace would have said. But when you were Linus, you informed us that you’d read the Narnia sequence. “I don’t read C.S. Lewis,” could be absolutely true of now, but need not have been true of an earlier period in your life.

          Apart from which, you could know about Eustace without having read the book. You could have seen the film, or read a summary of the plot.

          • Linus had a traditional Catholic upbringing. He’ll have read C.S. Lewis. Bet he’s still got an edition of The Chronicles of Narnia series – unless it was his sister’s.

          • Pubcrawler

            Isn’t Lewis a bit ‘proddy’ for cat’lick taste?

          • Not at all. A fine Christian and an honorary Catholic. Jack was raised on a childhood diet of Lewis and, then later, Tolkien.

          • Pubcrawler

            OK. I’m not sure ‘honorary Catholic’ is something he would relish — his NI proddy background was too strong an influence, even in his atheist days. Tolkien, of course, had the zeal of the convert (via his mother).

          • The Church of Ireland retained much of its Catholic theology, many being being somewhat reluctant protestants. Tolkien, of course, helped Lewis “see the light”.

  • IanCad

    War In Europe!!
    We need war in the UK. This wretched Scottish Parliament must be overthrown by force of arms PDQ. It will be easy now – much harder later.

    • Merchantman

      Probably better to refer to the so called Scottish Parliament as being of ‘that country’. If ever ‘they’ (SNP) lose power it wont be a pretty sight.

      • IanCad

        They won’t go quietly.

      • Anton

        If they actually gained Independence for Scotland they’d be out at the next election.

  • Politically__Incorrect

    I feel much safer now that Barchester’s Home Guard are fully prepared for the war Mr Cameron expects. Frankly, I think the EU is heading towards civil war anyway. This empire is much more divided and disparate than civil war-torn America ever was. The more Brussels tries to coerce EU members into the mould the more they will resist. It may not end in war in the usual sense, but civil strife and disruption that can be just as damaging. The EU will probably have to set up it’s own Scottish-style police force to monitor everybody’s thoughts, words, and deeds, and crack down on any dissenters. Happy times ahead for the EU.

    • preacher

      1984 ? That has a familiar ring !.

      • Politically__Incorrect

        It’s the EU handbook

  • The Explorer

    Have we got Linus back already? Of all the Narnia characters Eustace, in his unregenerate state, is the obvious one.

    • CliveM

      Pfft he never really went away! I think the ‘absence ‘ lasted 1 hour.

      • The Explorer

        You’re right. Eustace appeared on the very same thread from which Findarato disappeared.

        • CliveM

          We hold an attraction to him.

          • The Explorer

            He seems to fear that unless he constantly monitors us, this blog could cause a recrudescence of Christianity within the wider culture. He is playing a crucial role in maintaining civilisation.by keeping us corralled.

          • CliveM

            Yep his ego is big enough to see himself in that sort of light.

          • Ivan M

            The Eustace personality crimps his style somewhat. He is a talented man.

        • Within the hour.

        • Pubcrawler

          [Ooops, wrong place]

      • Uncle Brian

        How long will this incarnation last? A few weeks? A few months?

        • The Explorer

          He knows he’s Linus. We know he’s Linus. But if he refuses to admit we know, Eustace could be around for a while. On the other hand, some of his identities have lasted only a couple of days. It rests with whoever is behind Linus. (And all the others.)

          • Happy Jack politely enquired:

            “With your permission, Jack could ask the host of this weblog whether your IPS address is the same as a former poster. This would clear up any doubt. Do you consent to this?”

            To which ‘Eustace’ replied:

            “But if I am this other poster, wouldn’t such an exercise be rather pointless? If I wanted to hide my identity, I could easily pass via a proxy server.”

          • The Explorer

            I see I’m behind the times. I’ve been off blog for a bit. Always a mistake when it comes to Linus spotting. I see Eustace was outed as Linus on the first thread on which he appeared.

          • Pubcrawler was the first to spot our French Pimple.

          • Pubcrawler

            Clive had an inkling as well, it’s a team effort.

  • Uncle Brian

    I’m sorry to hear of your bereavement, Mrs P. Please accept my condolences. Perhaps you would be kind enough to pass a message along to Mr Harding, reassuring him that his fears about the impending prohibition of music are almost certainly exaggerated. All overtly Christian music, from plainchant to Lead Kindly Light, will of course be driven underground, but instrumental works such as Mr Harding likes to perform upon his sturdy violoncello will still be permitted, on one condition. Henceforth they are to be played by men only. As the late Sir Thomas Beecham acutely observed on a memorable occasion, scratching the instrument between her legs is not at all the sort of thing a woman ought to do.

    • Anton

      If the majority of modern worship songs are banned then one good thing would have come out of it.

    • carl jacobs

      Brian

      This is totally off topic, but what is happening in Brazil?

      • Uncle Brian

        The short answer, Carl, is that everything you’re reading in the newspapers is true, except for the dire warnings about imminent civil unrest. People have naturally been glued to their television sets, watching the voting live, first in the Chamber of Deputies and then yesterday in the Senate, but there are no mobs in the streets – no more than little knots of protesters here and there. All very calm, quite remarkably so, in fact. Most impressive. Vice president Michel Temer took over yesterday as acting president, pending the outcome of the trial of Dilma Rousseff, to be conducted by the Senate. The Workers Party is now in opposition once again, after enjoying the privileges of power for an unbroken thirteen years.

        Temer’s new ministers are already at their desks. The most promising appointment is Henrique Meirelles in the powerful position of Finance Minister. A banker by profession, for three years in the 1990s Meirelles was president and COO of BankBoston worldwide, and later served as president of the Brazilian Central Bank. Temer himself, on the other hand, is really no more than yet another old-fashioned wheeler-dealer professional politician, but he is a much more competent manager than Rousseff ever was.

    • Politically__Incorrect

      “…scratching the instrument between her legs is not at all the sort of thing a woman ought to do…”

      Indeed, a shocking sight for the highly-strung

    • Mrs Proudie of Barchester

      Thank you Uncle Brian…being ill at the same time has not helped, but thank you…

  • Anton

    Mrs Proudie’s Christian name is Sarah? (Re the garlic.)

    • Rhoda

      Mrs Olivia Proudie

      • Anton

        T’would be ungallant of me to reveal Mrs Proudie’s sources but I’m sure she knows who Sarah is.

        • Pubcrawler

          You’re such a card….

          • Mrs Proudie of Barchester

            Indeed…one had other things on one’s mind…

        • William Lewis

          The reference of lost on me, I’m afraid.

          • Anton

            I shall not be ungallant, but google is your friend…

  • Anton

    “My word… my Lord the Bishop has a spine.”

    Doe anybody know the source of that wonderful comment in which it was claimed that as part of the consecration of a bishop his fellow prelates gather round him and remove his spine?

    • Uncle Brian

      The expression rings a distant bell. It sounds like the kind of thing Churchill might have said, though about his fellow politicians rather than bishops.

  • chiefofsinners

    Jolly good to see Mark Carnage backing up the mongers of doom with his apocalypse-lite Toronto prophetic ministries. Is there a passing resemblance to Private Frazer? Don’t say I didnay warn ye.
    Let’s face it, war is best avoided. Some of us are still clearing up from the last one. A few doors down from chez Chief, there is a Bathbomb so large that roads have been closed and God fearing folk forced to the race course. Ruddy Germans. Not all bad though: The offspring (little misschiefofsinners, brother Hank) have been enjoying a day off school. The first of many, it would seem, now that Gove’s holiday grab has been overturned by Lord Justice Clubmed.

    • Inspector General

      “Of course my child hasn’t been to school today, headmaster. We took her to Margate for the day. Next week, she’s going to stay with her Aunty Rene in Scarborough…”

      • chiefofsinners

        That’s just fine. Your Named Person will be in touch shortly.

        • Merchantman

          Of course none of this will be reported in the ominously named ‘Guardian’ newspaper.

        • Inspector General

          “Mummy, why don’t the brown people like us?”

          “Hush child, if your Named Person hears what you said you’ll be put into a children’s home and you’ll be prostituting yourself at 16”

          • Pubcrawler

            At 12, more likely.

          • Inspector General

            Good Evening to you, Crawler. All one can say is that your comment is beyond cynical in that state run children’s homes do not allow their charges to whore at such an early age, or so the Inspector would like to think…

          • Pubcrawler

            One would very much hope so. But if operated by those who adhere to a ‘parallel’ legal code…

    • Mrs Proudie of Barchester

      Mark Carnage…priceless!

      • chiefofsinners

        …and yet it would seem that he has been bought.

        • Anton

          And probably not with fiat currency.

          • chiefofsinners

            Pieces of silver are most acceptable, I hear.

        • bluedog

          Mr Carnage can see a recession coming and is just taking the precaution of blaming Brexit in a pre-emptive strike. It’s called ‘managing expectations with cynical dishonesty’.

  • Inspector General

    Good day to you, Mrs Proudie

    The Inspector is among many who fear the Scottish National Socialists ‘named person’ scheme will be put to sinister use, and children will be encouraged to report parents who are traitors to the cause, most especially those who do not support independence…

    Meanwhile, the Queen of Scots now rules by apparent decree, as there is no opposition to her, and has declared her intention to make Scotland the cosiest place on this earth to be queer in. Which is bloody marvellous, except a long standing desire of militant LGBT is to knock a good 2 years off the male age of consent with the aim of introducing legalised pederasty. Don’t be surprised if consequently Mr Tatchell ups sticks and rushes north of the border, after his statements of years past declaring sexual activity involving children is not necessarily a bad thing(!) from their point of view (How it disgusts one to say that…)

    Everything seems arse about face in that airy fairy land since those who cannot accept ‘NO!’ took over – perhaps the original intention was to make Scotland the best place to be ginger in, but mission creep took over. Whatever it was is rather academic – the presence of a dodgy electorate who will never vote the buggers out just about seals its fate.

    Do pass on the Inspector’s regards to Barchester’s widows. He hopes to visit shortly as he enjoys so much watching the small orphans struggling to gather firewood in the forest in their hand-me-down rags…

    Right, time to wash out ones mouth with carbolic and a have a damn good shot of whisky afterwards…

    Farewell for now, dear lady.

  • carl jacobs

    Carl is beginning to develop a healthy respect for Jack’s Linus Detection Software, that’s for sure.

    • CliveM

      Pubcrawler spotted him first :0)

      • Pubcrawler

        You dropped something of a hint, though. But yes, his reaction to my comment on his first ‘Eustace’ comment was so screamingly obvious it simply had to be him.

        • And he was trying so hard to exercise some restraint too.

          • Pubcrawler

            About as hard as I would try to turn down a free bottle of Ardbeg…

          • You dented his pride, Sir. That was very mean of you. It was downhill from there onwards.

  • Shadrach Fire

    Your scribblings Mrs Proudie are always the light of my day. You tongue in check analysis of events of the day have a ring to them that would make Westminster quiver. keep them coming.

    • Mrs Proudie of Barchester

      Many thanks dear Shadrach, I am so pleased you enjoy them.

  • carl jacobs

    I don’t know if I would call the French “savages”. It’s probably just a deep-seated inferiority complex. Besides, they drive on the right side of the road so they have at least some attachment to civilization.

    • Anton

      The right side is the wrong side.

      • carl jacobs

        Since the whole of Europe drives on the right side, this sounds like a good thing for the EU to set as a standard. I’m sure there are efficiencies to be purchased.

        • William Lewis

          That’s what Napoleon thought.

          • carl jacobs

            Poor Napoleon. What an historical burden it must be to carry the End of the Greatness that was France.

        • Anton

          In which case it’s another good reason to quit the EU.

        • CliveM

          The whole of Europe is wrong.

          It’s safer to drive on the left, when most people are right handed.

        • Inspector General

          Unless the Inspector is mistaken, Carl, certain European countries trains run on the left…a legacy of the British invention of railways as we know them today…

    • William Lewis

      The civilised man drives on the left so as to keep his sword arm ready for oncoming traffic.

      • Anton

        As at tournaments in the tilting.

        • William Lewis

          Indeed

    • sarky

      Savages?? More like cheese eating surrender monkeys.

    • fitzfitz

      The inferiority complex in Continental France is very real, very deep. Especially vis-a-vis rescue or defeat by Britain across the centuries. Vichy and the like contribute with a thread of guilt – or perhaps more a fear of being found out. In their territories overseas the people are more confident – as in St Pierre & Miquelon – that little bit of France embedded in Canada, odfly so little referred to.

  • Uncle Brian

    My bet is 100 days.

    • CliveM

      120 days.

      • 7 days- or less. He’ll disappear shortly.

        “I’m intrigued to know why you think I’ve posted here before.

        I did open an account here a while ago and I posted a few messages, but the tenor of the conversation didn’t suit me, so I didn’t stay.

        That was some time ago. At least a couple of years, I think. And for the life of me I can’t remember what screen name I used. I suppose it may have been Linus, but I have no recollection of ever using that name. If I did however, and you remember the few short posts I made well enough to recognise me now, I’m really rather impressed. You must have the memory of an elephant as well as a significant gift for literary analysis.

        You’re not one of those chaps who analysed the Gospels and worked out which bits were original and which were added later by different hands, are you?”

        • The Explorer

          On which thread was this conversation?

          • “Catholic bishops: picking their principles of social teaching.”

          • The Explorer

            Thank you. I had reached my conclusion independently, but that little exchange confirms it. An almost seamless transition.

          • Pubcrawler

            I missed that exchange before. Blimey, talk about protesting too much!

          • The Explorer

            Congratulations on identifying him so quickly. It must have been difficult for him holding himself back from attacking Mrs Proudie so as not to give himself away. As it is, he could have done so; since people knew who he was already.

            Hear that, Linus, you can bring out the heavy cannon?

        • CliveM

          For me this post was the clincher. It was so contrived. Desperate to appear to not be Linus!

          • And didn’t your comment just draw him out. Poor sod. He just can’t control himself. His references to Jewish fundamentalists and Satan was classic Linus.

          • CliveM

            Yes indeed. In some ways you can play him like a musical instrument.
            He does seem to be unable to control himself.

          • Insults is his Achilles heel.

          • CliveM

            Yes, he can’t resist the te.

            His other weakness is his total inability to use 1 word, when he can use 10. He just can’t keep it concise.

          • And some of the words he uses ….

          • CliveM

            His posts just scream ‘Linus ‘. Especially when he gets carried away by his own cleverness.

            Anyway, I am looking forward to following this latest version and seeing how long it lasts. I wonder if he will be able to resist a bit of gratuitous mysogeny!

          • Verbal incontinence.

      • The Explorer

        Is that an oblique reference to a certain work by the Marquis de Sade?

        • CliveM

          Sadly no, I’m not that learned.

  • Royinsouthwest

    For more information on the SNP’s STASI scheme see the link below.

    Fury over ‘Orwellian’ psychological tests for schoolchildren which sees them interrogated over whether their parents nurture them enough
    http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-3467642/Fury-Orwellian-psychological-tests-schoolchildren-sees-interrogated-parents-nurture-enough.html

    Yesterday, Dr Stuart Waiton, senior sociology lecturer at Abertay University in Dundee, said: ‘A major problem with the Named Person professionals is that they appear to have lost any sense of the family as an important private institution for society. Trust, loyalty and privacy in their warped eyes are transformed into secrets being hidden “behind closed doors”.

    ‘Once we see every child as vulnerable and every family as potentially toxic, the result is that professionals see less of a problem with interfering in the private lives of children and parents.’

    • William Lewis

      Chilling

    • Inspector General

      The family unit as such stands in the way of socialist ‘progress’ as you know…

    • Are the Scots so inadequate, incapable and or drink and drug addled that they are unable or unfit to bring up their children? Surely not, but it would seem that the Scottish Nutters party think so.

      • Inspector General

        Well, having seen the fly-on-the-wall documentary ‘Rab C Nesbitt’…

  • Russell Brown

    Mark Carney and the IMF think we are going to surrender our sovereignty this easily?

  • bluedog

    Very sorry to hear of your loss, Mrs P. You did suggest that things were becoming dire in a recent missive.

    You are quite right to draw a parallel between the French Revolution and recent developments in London. One could also include the Russian revolution as a broadly similar exercise where incremental liberalisation collapsed into mayhem. The prospect of the good burghers of the Emirate of Tooting being allowed the representation of any other than another Mahommedan appear negligible. One fears that many other boroughs may similarly fall into the hands of the infidel, until a crescent of representation is so dominated in the capital. No doubt the Barchester Fencibles are ready to stand between the dervishes and the Palace should the need arise. However, one notes Her Majesty is increasingly ensconced in Windsor Castle…

    • Mrs Proudie of Barchester

      Thank you dear Bluedog, it has been a difficult time indeed.

  • dannybhoy

    “Then we are doomed, Mrs. P,” said Mr. H.

    “We always were. Do help yourself to hobnobs.”

    “A domestic snippet: my Lord the Bishop is never one to make objection (I
    don’t let him as a rule) but he took me by surprise at supper on
    Tuesday. I had instructed cook to find something delectable from
    Monsieur Escoffier’s book of recipes, and waited expectantly for the
    compliment
    “GARLIC! Are you mad? For goodness sake my dear, we are not savages!” he spluttered.

    My word… my Lord the Bishop has a spine. Oh well, back to Mrs. Beaton and suet.”

    Mrs Proudie what a treasure you are. I do hope you will get around to inviting some of us for the weekend. You may not enjoy it but I’m sure we would..
    ps may I inquire as to whether the funeral went well?

    • Mrs Proudie of Barchester

      Yes, thank you Dannybhoy, as well as these things do. What I found hard was keeping a smile when faced with relatives who never set foot across the threshold to visit my mother before she died but found they had time for a free luncheon. But that is an un-Christian thought I know. Many thanks for your kind words.

      • Anton

        Your mother? I’m so sorry.

        • Mrs Proudie of Barchester

          Thank you Anton, bless you

      • dannybhoy

        Wit aside, one never wishes to intrude or assume, but Danny offers his own sympathy to you and yours.

        • Mrs Proudie of Barchester

          Much appreciated dannybhoy…

      • So sorry to hear this, Mrs P. God Bless.

        • Mrs Proudie of Barchester

          Ah dear Happy Jack, thank you.

      • Inspector General

        The Inspector’s deepest regret, dear thing…

        • Mrs Proudie of Barchester

          Dark days inspector, but there is light at the end of the tunnel…many thanks

      • sarky

        Not un-christian, just very very human. Sadly many of us put things off until it is too late, it doesnt mean we don’t care.
        Sorry for your loss.

        • Pubcrawler

          Too true.

      • CliveM

        Sorry to hear of the death of your Mother, God Bless.

        • Mrs Proudie of Barchester

          Bless you Clive

      • Pubcrawler

        Mrs P, I come late to this having been out all day. I am most sorry to hear of your loss — I dread the day when the Lord calls my own mother. But we have a sure and certain hope in the resurrection. You and yours are in my prayers.

        • Mrs Proudie of Barchester

          Thank you Pubcrawler.

      • preacher

        Apologies for the belated response to your loss dear friend. I’ve been rather busy & not been on line for a time.Losing a loved one is always painful, more for us than for them. The Lord’s resurrection was the seal on all His promises to us & the proof that death is not the end but a new beginning.
        Blessings. P.

        • Mrs Proudie of Barchester

          So very kind Preacher, thank you.

      • IrishNeanderthal

        This caught my eye this morning, while reading Eugene Onegin.

        He found the manor fairly bustling
        With those who’d known the now deceased;
        Both friends and foes had come ahustling,
        True lovers of a funeral feast.

        Chapter 1, verse 53: translated by James E. Falen

        • Mrs Proudie of Barchester

          Thank you for that Mr IrishN…it sort of sums up how I felt…though there were no foes present, just distant relatives who came out of the woodwork…

  • The Explorer

    Commiserations, Mrs Proudie.

    • Mrs Proudie of Barchester

      Bless you, Explorer, bless you.

  • len

    Sorry to hear of your loss Mrs Proudie.

    • Mrs Proudie of Barchester

      Many thanks len, it has been a difficult time

  • IanCad

    Commiserations Mrs. P.
    Lesser lassies would have delegated a Named Person to write the column if faced with a similar circumstance.

    • Mrs Proudie of Barchester

      Thank you Ian, much appreciated

  • Anton

    According to the front page of today’s Sunday times the BBC regards itself as “too Christian” and must “diversify” why greater representation of Muslim and other faiths.

    Whenever I switch on a BBC radio non-music nowadays it seems to me to present a drama about how difficult it is being an immigrant here (although people are always free to go back to the Third World…) or how ‘social services’ are failing people and the solution is always, of course, more taxpayers’ money.

    The point of the BBC is (or was) to be a national organisation, yet there are umpteen local BBC stations that compete (not very well) with unsubsidised local radio stations. The license fee is a improper perk that you have to pay the BBC in order to watch ITV, Sky etc.

    Time to end this nonsense.

    • Dreadnaught

      The bbc viwes the uk throgh the prism of Londonistan and a population of more than 50 per cent residents born