Real Easter Egg2
Market and Economics

Meaningful chocolate – The Real Easter Egg spreads the gospel

 

I have a question. Who on earth actually buys Easter eggs in January? I’m not talking about Creme Eggs (now no longer made with Dairy Milk and forever ruined), but the proper ones that mostly come in excessive, over-sized packaging with something extra thrown in for good measure. Either the supermarkets have nothing better to fill the shelves up with to replace the Christmas merchandise, or there’s a whole group of people who are so paranoid that stocks of their favourite chocolate eggs will run out by early March that they’d rather buy them asap just to be on the safe side.

Easter is no longer a festival of any significance. For the retailers it is just another season to make yet more sales, and for the average consumer it’s little more than an excuse to pig out on chocolate. The fact that I’m writing this in February, having already got sick of walking past rows of Smarties eggs at my local supermarket over the last few weeks, is depressing in itself.

At least Christmas, with its child-friendly story, manages to keep hold of a sense of the religious amongst all the consumerism. With Easter, we lost that connection long ago. It’s no surprise that in 2013 poll, 79 per cent of children did not know the actual meaning of Easter, with a quarter thinking that it’s a celebration of the Easter Bunny’s birthday. What  indication is there anywhere in our shops that Easter is fundamentally about Jesus?

The powerful forces of commercialism have fused with increasing secularisation and are slowly eradicating the religious nature of our festivals. We are left with a void that renders them meaningless. Even the concept of festivals as times to mark the flow of the year and affirm our collective roots is dying out, as the idolisation of the individual and happiness through material consumption turn them into orgies of wasteful excess.

The celebration of mankind’s salvation through Jesus’ death and resurrection at Easter has gone from being cultural to counter-cultural. Those who choose to enter the subversive fight to give it due respect take an honourable path. It is a battle for our historical and religious identity; for truth and the very dignity of our culture.

Against the onslaught of branded, soulless confectionery stands the humble Real Easter Egg. It not only seeks to reclaim Easter, but to present itself according to the highest ethical standards.

When in 2010 a team of Christians decided to launch a chocolate egg that contained the authentic message of Easter – and which also used high-quality Fair Trade chocolate and gave away a hefty portion of their profits to charity – it was met with a complete lack of interest by mainstream retailers. The Meaningful Chocolate Company might have had great chocolate and a noble ethic, but their religious meaning didn’t sit too well alongside Lindt bunnies and Chocolate Krispie chicks. So the company turned directly to churches and church schools, and received an overwhelming response. And every year since, as word has spread and orders flowed in, the company has sold out of their Real Easter Eggs, with demand continually outstripping ever-increasing supply.

Along the way they have faced criticism, even from Christian commentators;  had a radio advert banned after the watchdog seemed unsure if Easter was Christian; and been forced to change the colour of their sister advent calendar from the liturgical colour of purple because “it belonged to Cadbury”. They have now sold over one million eggs, of which 400,000 were sold in 2014. As a result, they have given away over £160,000 to charities.

Tesco and Waitrose have realised they made a mistake and now stock them. This is to their credit, and they should be applauded for seeing its worth (commercial, if not spiritual). Last year the Real Easter Egg was deservedly voted the UK’s third favourite Fair Trade product ahead of many leading brands. It is clearly meeting a need.

The Real Easter Egg is not an example of Christians just producing their own second-rate version of a product with a feel-good slogan to satisfy the self or preach to the converted. It is actually far better quality than many of the bigger-named branded eggs, and where it succeeds most of all is in bringing values to an arena that generally has no interest in them. The Special Peace Edition Egg even contains an olive wood peace dove keyring from the Holy Land. Which other manufacturers of Easter products care anything at all about enhancing understanding of the festival by which they grow their bottom line and satisfy their shareholders? The Real Easter Egg gives retailers an opportunity to offer their customers a product of quality and substance which informs as well as feeds.

The message behind Easter is ultimately one of hope: that mankind can be reconciled to God and restored through His Son. The gift of salvation is far too important to keep behind closed church doors. Easter was always meant to be a blessing to everyone, and that is what the Real Easter Egg points to in its own small way.

Unlike the bigger commercialised brands, supplies of the Real Easter Egg are expected to run out well before Easter Day. So, in this case, early purchasing is perfectly sensible. The Meaningful Chocolate Company website is taking orders until February 27th, and after that you’ll have to try WaitroseTesco or Ocado. If we care about shining the light of truth into a society that increasingly wallows in the darkness of ignorance, then this is a company that deserves to be supported – even more so if you appreciate great chocolate, ethical manufacturing and fair trade.

  • The Explorer

    The Easter Bunny’s birthday. Love it! Two other symptoms that Easter has lost its religious significance.
    1. You can buy Hot Cross buns all the year round.
    2. Proposals to nail the date so that school terms can be equal length.

    • Uncle Brian

      Quite a long time ago (from memory, during the JP2 pontificate) the Catholic Church said it would have no theological objection to moving to a fixed Easter. The only real objection seems to be that it would lead to schism, with some Christians refusing to accept the change.

      • CliveM

        The dating of Easter has been a source of real conflict in the past. Could never really understand why it wasn’t a fixed date.

        However I’m not sure even if it agreed to a fixed date, it would necessarily satisfy the requirement for fixed, equal school terms.

        • The Explorer

          I think it may be because in John’s Gospel Christ is represented as the sacrificial Passover lamb. And because the Passover is moveable feast to tie in with the new moon, Easter, as the new Passover, must be as well.

          • CliveM

            Hi Explorer

            Yes thanks, I should have thought of that.

            Interestingly my experience of Easter is more based in Scotland where unless you were RC both the Church and civil authorities barely noticed it. It wasn’t a national holiday for example.

            Prespyterianism I’m afraid!!

          • Uncle Brian

            I can understand the Puritans’ reasons for banning Christmas as unbiblical, but I didn’t know they’d abolished Easter as well. How unChristian!

          • The Explorer

            No more cakes and ale. And as for chocolate…!

          • Anton

            I guess it was a reaction against the fact that such things had been effectively compulsory. St Paul is clear (put Romans 14:5 together with Colossians 2:16) that a calendar is voluntary. He speaks strongly against a calendar in Galatians but that was in the specific context of whether gentile converts must take up the Jewish law including the festivals.

          • CliveM

            Well the ‘festival’ was ignored. But the event was certainly central to the faith.

          • sarky

            Its not a national holiday here. Only good Friday and easter Monday.

          • CliveM

            I would imagine that the reason for that is with Easter Day being a Sunday and traditionally a day of rest anyway, it wasn’t needed to be designated a holiday. In Scotland you didn’t get Good Friday or Easter Monday either.

          • The Explorer

            Isn’t there some anomaly about Easter Sunday? Garden centres can’t be open? Or have they changed it?

          • Anton

            Which raises the question of why it doesn’t always coincide with the Jewish Passover. The answer – spurred by much mutual dislike, unfortunately – is that the Christians reckoned the Jews were doing their calculations wrong.

            The discrepancy between John and the other gospels about whether the Last Supper is a Passover meal, or the night before, is because squabbling groups of Jews held it on different nights; it was the Passover meal for Jesus but the night before for the Jewish authorities. So Jesus ate the Passover with his disciples as in Matthew, Mark and Luke, and he died next day – tellingly – at the time the Jews sacrificed the Passover lamb, as John states.

          • Pubcrawler

            Also the Jewish calendar is entirely lunar, with a system of intercalaries to bring it back into synch with the solar calendar every 19 years, I think it is.

            The Easter computus ties Easter into a narrower band by pinning it more firmly to the solar calendar via the vernal equinox.

            And then there’s the Quartodecimans…

          • Uncle Brian

            There’s a much more basic reason for the discrepancy: Passover can fall on any day of the week, as long as it coincides with the full moon, while Easter is the first Sunday
            after the full moon.

          • Pubcrawler

            Passover is on the full moon, not the new moon.

          • The Explorer

            Apologies. Moon related, anyway; hence not fixed.

        • Mrs Proudie of Barchester

          I’ve never dated at Easter.

  • Anton

    Always thought it odd that chocolate is one of the main items people give up during Lent while Easter eggs are rattling round. When I went nonconformist I decided to give up Lent. So I’ll try one of these Meaningful eggs, which sound good.

    Gillan, you say that the “celebration of mankind’s salvation through Jesus’ death and resurrection at Easter has gone from being cultural to counter-cultural.” I suggest that the true church has always been counter-cultural during this present evil age.

    • The Explorer

      What timescale do you have in mind by ‘present’?

      • Anton

        The age during which Satan is not yet bound; manifestly he is still deceiving the nations. (See Revelation 20:1-3; for “present evil age” see Galatians 1:4.)

        • The Explorer

          I asked because I see the Millennium as the period between the First and Second Coming. I see Satan as ‘bound’ in the sense of being restricted. Eventually he will be unbound, and that will bring about the end of the present age.

          • Anton

            I’m a premillennialist post-tribber. I can nearly but not quite work out where you stand. Vigorous debate over such things is fine but should never lead to fallings-out within the body of Christ.

          • The Explorer

            I’m an amillennialist who thinks believers will not be exempt from the Tribulation, but I’m undogmatic about it. It’s certainly not an issue I would want to fall out with fellow believers about.

          • chiefofsinners

            Amen, amen. I’m a pan millennialist. Let’s have an argument about whether we should fall out about it or not.

          • The Explorer

            Does that mean panning all the other interpretations?

          • chiefofsinners

            No, it is the philosophy that it will all pan out in the end, so let’s not get too worked up about it. Sadly lacking in my experience.

          • The Explorer

            As I said, I’m undogmatic about it. I dread those with certainty.

          • Mrs Proudie of Barchester

            I’m a pro-millinery person…a boater is always acceptable but you can’t beat a good poke…

          • Anton

            Get stuffed.

  • The Explorer

    Actually, it IS the Easter Bunny’s birthday in the sense that the rabbit is Oestre’s symbol, and Oestre represents new life. But I don’t suppose that’s the thinking behind it.

    • Anton

      Been reading Bede, have we?

      • The Explorer

        More mundanely, I first came across her via Oestrogen.

        • Mrs Proudie of Barchester

          Bede is a woman? I never suspected for a minute…

          • The Explorer

            Despite the appellation “the venerable Bede” there are limits. It’s now a case of ‘Bede was’ rather than ‘Bede is’.
            At weekends, his name was Mandy. Regrettably, the ‘her’ is the Oestre of the previous post.

          • CliveM

            Fairs, fair, he was a bit of a gossip. Easy mistake to make!!

          • The Explorer

            Mrs Proudie is always on the lookout for equivalents of Mr Slope.

          • Mrs Proudie of Barchester

            I seek and I usually find…such is the glorious diversity of modern Britain

  • Actually I’ve always wondered where Easter eggs and the Easter bunny fitted into the Jesus /Easter story. Are they from like Christian midrash or something?

    • Anton

      Eggs are probably a pagan fertility symbol although I don’t know how they entered a church festival. Not a clue about the bunny. About the name, Easter comes from the Anglo-Saxon name of the relevant month, which Bede said in his Ecclesiastical History is derived from an ancient goddess called Eostre; this derivation is probably via the Anglo-Saxon name for springtide. The name entered English Bibles in Tyndale’s translation (Luther did the same in his German translation); it persisted in the King James Bible in one place, Acts 12:4. The Greek New Testament, and the Latin Vulgate Bible, call it Pascha, from the Hebrew for Passover, a name still used in Eastern Orthodox churches and which I much prefer.

      • Uncle Brian

        There are languages that have only a single word for both Passover and Easter and others where the names are only slightly different, such as French Pâque (Passover) and Pâques (Easter)

      • Hi Anton

        I’m looking forward to Pesach, but Purim’s first…. I’m always surprised that you guys have so little festivals, except Easter, Christmas and the Pentecost.

        • CliveM

          Look at Catholic Europe, they have a lot more festivals.

          • Mrs Proudie of Barchester

            Here in Barchester we celebrate the Feasts of St. Jude the Obscure (Patron Saint of Bloggers, Nerds and Accountants), St Peter of Tatchell and the Blessed Margaret of Finchley. They seem to cover most of our diverse clientele… There are of course the lesser Feast Days of the Holy Parakeet, the Foolish Virgins of Essex and the Mystery of Bruce Forsyth.

          • CliveM

            The “Foolish virgins of Essex”, mythical creatures surely?

          • Mrs Proudie of Barchester

            Yes indeed, dear Clive. There were very few of them in the first place and now there are none. As yet, nobody has been able to explain the Mystery of Bruce Forsyth, and yet he goes on..and on..and on…

        • Uncle Brian

          Carnival. Strictly speaking, just Shrove Tuesday, but nowadays — at least here in Brazil — four days long, beginning tomorrow!

          • Hi UB

            Have fun then!

          • Uncle Brian

            Thank you, I will. And sof shevuah tov to you too!

        • Anton

          That’s because we started out persecuted. (I mean that factually, not as a slap.)

    • CliveM

      Hannah

      “Easter is a religious holiday, but some of its customs, such as Easter eggs, are likely linked to pagan traditions. The egg, an ancient symbol of new life, has been associated with pagan festivals celebrating spring. From a Christian perspective, Easter eggs are said to represent Jesus’ emergence from the tomb and resurrection.”

      The Easter Bunny is secular, a relatively recent import from the States, who probably got it from the German tradition of an egg laying Hare.

    • CliveM

      Hi Hannah

      “Easter is a religious holiday, but some of its customs, such as Easter eggs, are likely linked to pagan traditions. The egg, an ancient symbol of new life, has been associated with pagan festivals celebrating spring. From a Christian perspective, Easter eggs are said to represent Jesus’ emergence from the tomb and resurrection.”

      The Easter Bunny is a Secular import from the USA, who themselves probably got if from the German tradition of an egg laying Hare.

      • Hi Clive

        Egg laying hare?? Sounds like sci fi!

        • CliveM

          Also painful!

    • The Explorer

      Christianity took two different attitudes towards paganism.
      1. “What has Athens to do with Jerusalem?” (Tertullian).
      2. “Whatever has been well said belongs to us.” Justin Martyr.
      I imagine those in the Church inclined to the JM view tried to find accommodation with the Anglo-Saxon fertility goddess Oestre, who had rabbits (bonking) and eggs (new life) as her symbols.
      You accept our festival, and we’ll absorb your eggs and bunnies. We’ll even give our festival Oestre’s name to show the common ground.
      I’m guessing, but I imagine it was something along those lines, as with the date for Christmas. You could do it if you saw Christianity as the fulfilment of what was true in paganism. If you didn’t, it was a regrettable concession.

      • Pubcrawler

        I doubt very much that Oestre carried much clout in mainland Europe and the eastern Mediterranean, but the Orthodox and others have had Paschal eggs since about forever.

        The whole Easter/Oestre issue is a red herring, as it doesn’t apply in most of Christendom.

        • The Explorer

          Agreed, ‘Easter’ is an Anglo-Saxon anomaly. It arose for me as an issue when I wondered why Easter had its name when the French Paques (or however it’s spelled) reflected Paschal.
          Still, the fact that Oestre has given us the important term Oestrogen must mean she can’t have been that insignificant.

          • Mrs Proudie of Barchester

            am I right in thinking ‘placenta’ is Latin for cakes?

          • The Explorer

            I believe so. Flat cakes. Hobnobs that have failed to rise.

          • Mrs Proudie of Barchester

            Yes indeed, but I was thinking in terms of placenta (after birth) which traditionally used to be eaten…

          • The Explorer

            I believe placenta (in our modern sense) was so called because of its flat, slab-like appearance. Any significance beyond that is beyond my etymological knowledge.
            In the same sort of way, oestrogen derives from the Latin ‘oestrus’, but how exactly oestrus links up with Oestre (I remember reading somewhere that it did) is also beyond me.

          • Mrs Proudie of Barchester

            A flat, slab-like appearance? I once saw George Osborne play Charlie’s Aunt at the Oxford Union…

          • Dreadnaught

            Wasn’t he an opera singer?

          • Umm … “placenta uterine” literally means: “uterine cake”.

      • Anton

        Pope Gregory “the Great” explicitly recommended Christianising the pagan AngloSaxon feasts in a latter to his missionaries here written early in the 7th century; this letter is included in Bede’s Ecclesiastical History of the English People, book I, chapter 30.

      • Hi explorer,

        I’m guessing it’s easier to sell a religion if it adapts part of the other it is taking over. I remember some saying to me Christmas was a pagan festival that Christians adopted for themselves ?

        • The Explorer

          The date, rather than the concept.

          • CliveM

            Even the date is not necessarily pagan.

          • Yes, I think that’s what they meant: I dunno is there a pagan analogue to the Christmas story?

          • CliveM

            Some say it’s based on being 9 months prior to an estimated conception date of 23rd March.

          • sarky

            Some romans worshipped mithras. Although it predated christianity, it has some very striking similarities. Google and see!!!

          • The Explorer

            And even more striking differences.

          • sarky
        • CliveM

          The origin of Christmas is open to different understandings. But some of the traditions are certainly pagan. Like the Yule Log.

          • Hi Clive

            I’m guessing for Christians the origin of Christmas is Matthew and Luke…. ?

          • CliveM

            Sorry I was specifically referring to date choice.

      • Coniston

        C. S. Lewis said that all that was of value in paganism (and other religions) found their fulfilment in Christianity (and he much preferred paganism to materialistic atheism). What was true in other earlier religions were foreshadows, in mythical form, of what became true in Christianity – the dying god who came to life again for example. Their myths – if true myths – became fact in the life of Christ. He said we should expect this, and be concerned if they were not there. His essay ‘Myth Became Fact’ illustrates this.

        • Anton

          To find out what God, rather than CS Lewis, thinks of paganism, have a look at the comments in the Old Testament about the gods of other nations.

          • The Explorer

            In the New Testament, Paul speaks of demons behind the pagan gods. But he also cites “an unknown god” and quotes the pagan Epimenides. That, surely, is where Lewis is coming from? He did, after all, say that bad mythology contained elements of the diabolical.

          • Anton

            You have to make Christianity comprehensible to people when preaching. But if they convert then they should take God’s view of their former beliefs and the OT is clear what that is.

          • The Explorer

            I concede that the Ephesian soothsayers burned their books.

          • Mrs Proudie of Barchester

            Ah comprehensible… well, a hefty swipe across the chops with Foxe’s Book of Martyrs is often salutary and makes Hellfire almost palpable, until the swelling dies down…

          • Anton

            It is deeply unreliable as a source of historical fact.

        • CliveM

          CS Lewis was very interested in myth and it’s truths.

        • Rasher Bacon

          Thanks – interesting that GK Chesterton explored the outcome of the concept that Genesis does tell the story (surely not?!) of beginnings in the Everlasting Man. That would be Fact becomes Myth – the prequel to CSL’s title

      • Rasher Bacon

        Not sure about the basis for all that Oestre stuff- source seems to be an inconclusive patch of the Venomous Bede’s writing and the sort of books that mostly end up in charity shops. Arguably written back by indignant pagans into a period that post dates the Passover, moaning that Christianity thieved their creativity.

        Haven’t read the Bede for myself though.

        • The Explorer

          I’m rather vague about it all myself. I became aware of Oestre as a possible solution when I asked myself the question, “Why is Easter called Easter?” If you know of an alternative explanation, I’d be very happy to go along with it.

          • Rasher Bacon

            Something about old German words for east – dawn and rising, and of course it’s called Pâques in French which is taken straight from Passover. but am burning curry at the moment. Will get rice going and find a link from somewhere…

            Would be much more fun to wind up His Graysh about oestrogen for a while though- I see he’s bewailing our comments on Twitter.

          • The Explorer

            Oestre’s name was probably derived from the fact that the sun rises in the East. New day, new life. But sunrise doesn’t account for the eggs and rabbits. Oestre does.

    • Phil R

      What are rabbits famous for hannah?

      Christians used to multiply the same way and still do outside of the liberal west

      • But what’s that got to do with Easter?

        • The Explorer

          Easter is about the Resurrection, which means new life. Bonking bunnies lead to baby bunnies = new life.

          • CliveM

            I can’t be certain on this but I don’t remember bonking bunnies (or any other bunny) having a big part of my childhood Easters? The obsession with the Easter Bunny in the UK, seems more recent.

          • Uncle Brian

            There was certainly no such thing as Halloween, either, when I was growing up in North London, in the mid-twentieth century. Guy Fawkes, yes. Halloween, no.

          • CliveM

            No I don’t remember Halloween either and trick or treating NEVER!! Although in Scotland we did do guising.

        • Master Atheistic

          Absolutely nothing to do with the original pagan spring festivals which celebrated new life, (hence eggs, rabbits, fresh flowers, etc.). Easter is just another example of a pagan festival being hijacked for the new cannibalistic zombie rabbi death cult.Same as they did with Christmas, (Saturnalia, the winter solstice) and All Hallows Eve, (Originally Samaine).

          • Anton

            I’m not going to rise to “cannibalistic zombie rabbi death cult”. But not every Christian agrees with Pope Gregory’s advocacy in the 7th century of trying to Christianise pagan festivals.

            Two of the foundational events of Christianity – Jesus’ crucifixion, and Pentecost – were timed, non-coincidentally, to coincide with Jewish rather than pagan festivals.

          • Mrs Proudie of Barchester

            Goodness! A ‘cannibalistic zombie rabbi death cult’ …so you have met the Plymouth Brethren then?

          • CliveM

            Mrs Proudie

            Please decist from slandering the PB’s . A large chunk of my family are PB’s and none of them eat their victims live.

          • Mrs Proudie of Barchester

            Just a little whimsy, dear Clive, nothing more…

          • Uncle Brian

            First of all, Mrs Proudie, I wish you a very happy Valentine’s day!
            Mrs P, if you read Clive’s comment carefully, you will see that he is only denying the slander that PBs eat their victims live.

          • Mrs Proudie of Barchester

            Why thank you dear Uncle Brian…

        • Phil R

          Christians used to be famous for the number of children they had in the Roman world.

          They did had lost of sex (but only within marriage) they did not take the contraceptive plants and most surprisingly they did not simply get rid of unwanted babies (Female, disabled or in convenient)

          I think they might have been quire pleased with the the rabbit analogy.

          Perhaps we need to ditch the fish on the back of cars and take up the two rabbits doing you know what. Years ago I had one on my VW Rabbit. underneath was the phrase in German (Direct injection)

          Might make people take notice

      • sarky

        Eating carrots?

  • Inspector General

    First came the Easter egg, then the official and provisional wings of the Easter
    egg movement, and now we have The Real Easter Egg.

    Continuity Easter Egg anyone….

    • We live in a post-eggological age, Inspector.

      • Dominic Stockford

        Hagiological eggology cannot be far away.

  • preacher

    When the church turns away from God & His offer of salvation through the cross of Christ & attempts to gain souls by replacing it with childish tacky chocolate treats, the outcome is blatantly obvious. The children’s lack of knowledge about the true meaning of the gospel is evidence enough & when they grow to adulthood the situation will worsen by leaps & bounds.
    The soft ‘gospel’ that is offered by many churches is no gospel at all, but a placebo from the devil to lure many to everlasting doom. We are inundated nowadays with party tricks to make the multitudes eyes sparkle like kids at a party watching an entertainer doing magic tricks.
    Many Ministers are scared of preaching the gospel in case they offend the sensitive souls who will then leave their church, I promise you leaders, that they will be more offended at the fate that awaits them on the day of judgement, but at least you will not be responsible.
    The answer is that we need a God sent revival, with men of God who aren’t afraid to preach the gospel. Only God can accomplish this & send the Holy Spirit to affirm the message by convicting us of sin & the need of repentance.
    All the revivals starting with Peter’s Pentecost message & through all the ages have been wrought through the fearless preaching of Christ Crucified for man’s sin, & His resurrection on the third day to prove the truth of His claim to deliver us from sin & judgement.
    No sleight of hand, ‘gold dust’, soft sell or choccy eggs. Just the plain truth of God’s love & mercy to an undeserving World.

    • Dominic Stockford

      I shall endeavour to buy one, and if they have a direct quotation of significance from the words of life clearly in it, then I shall be back to you with a little hope.

      • preacher

        Good luck Dominic, But don’t hold your breath while you search!.

    • Martin

      Preacher

      If I thought that those selling the eggs had any idea what the gospel was I might have some hope.

  • AncientBriton
    • Mrs Proudie of Barchester

      There were halal hot cross buns on sale in South Africa a while back, I believe…

      • CliveM

        Surely you jest?!

        • Dreadnaught

          The must have been croissants

          • CliveM

            Well that would be logical then.

          • Mrs Proudie of Barchester

            No no dear boys, it is a true story – google it

          • CliveM

            Mrs Proudie

            As usual you are correct.

      • sarky

        They were on the shelf next to the kosher pork pies.

  • carl jacobs

    It’s hard to fault people who give away their profit. If it weren’t for that fact, I would look at this idea askance. Assuming the Gospel they present is valid, then let them serve as they are called.

    • CliveM

      A brave attempt at bringing this blog back on topic!

  • Sounds like a good product and Happy Jack will support this initiative. He enjoys tucking into a good Easter Egg on Easter Sunday.

  • Dominic Stockford

    It has a point behind it, ans as carl has said, if the Gospel presented is the Gospel, rather than man’s version of it, then well done them.

    Small point though, ‘fairtrade’. For those farmers who can’t manage to meet the standards demanded by fairtrade it is in fact a hindrance. Small farmers are known to have been effectively put out of business because others can meet required standards, which they cannot, so all sales end up going to ft, and theirs which are also necessarily more expensive for a variety of reasons, simply go nowhere. It is, to say the least, a “mixed blessing”.

    • Doctor Crackles

      Fairtrade is a badge of honour worn by left-leaning Christians. I am sure Gillan fully supports it.

    • Anton

      Fairtrade is the most astute marketing slogan I have come across for a long time.

  • len

    As Europe descends (back) into paganism the worship of fertility gods bunnies eggs etc can only be expected I suppose?.
    Christianity needs to stripped away from pagan festivals which only confuse and blur the Gospel message.

    • Anton

      The only idolatry I struggle against is chocolate.

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