Jeremy Corbyn Cabinet 2a
Democracy

Jeremy Corbyn's path to power is more plausible than people think

 

Usually somewhere between three and 30 people avail themselves of the #Amen prayer facility at the bottom of this blog’s Home Page. Since it was installed, the most believers gathered in prayerful communion has been 31 (for persecuted Christians in the Middle East), and the average over the year has been 10, which is efficacious, because where two or three are gathered.. But, at the time of writing, a whopping 224 are praying for the left-winger Jeremy Corbyn to become leader of the Labour Party.

It was a playful prayer, and doubtless many who right-clicked ‘Pray Now’ did so with a whimsical digit on their mouse. But it would be a mistake to judge the sincerity of political fervour. This blog attracts readers from across the political (and theological) spectrum: over the past week, some 31,902 people have visited and made 53,651 page-views. Many Labour supporters sincerely desire Jeremy Corbyn to be elected leader (authentic; consistent; pro-Palestine; anti-austerity, etc.); and so do many Conservatives (failed Old Labour; unreconstituted Bennite; friend of terrorists who will put Labour out of office for a generation, etc.).

A recent YouGov poll placed Jeremy Corbyn ahead of all his rivals. Under the Alternative Vote (AV) system, Corbyn had 43% of first preferences, Andy Burnham 26%, Yvette Cooper 20% and Liz Kendall 11%. A few second-preference supporters could swing it for him, and the poll suggested a 6% win over nearest rival Andy Burnham (though it’s worth bearing in mind that the methodology and reliability of political polling has taken a bit of a hit in the wake of the General Election result). So afraid are the disciples of New Labour of a Corbyn victory that they exhorted Tony Blair to intervene, and, like Labour’s own Pope Emeritus, he blessed those who remain faithful to Laborem Novum. In his homily he warned of the danger of lurch to the left, adding that people who say their heart was with Jeremy Corbyn should “get a transplant”. Charming.

The Labour Party is divided: like all the main political parties in a liberal democracy, it is a sometimes fraught and fragile coalition of competing interests and mutually-exclusive philosophies. The Blairite ‘New Labour’ wing is persuaded that the Bennite ‘Old Labour’ wing would put Labour out of office for 20 years; that a Corbyn-led government is simply not right the right choice at all: “It would not take the country forward, it would take the country back,” Blair said.

But Jeremy Corbyn is having none of this progressive socialist theory: he is a devout traditionalist, believing that the old paths were righteous and the new progressive piety is a modernist betrayal of Labour’s heritage and a corruption of its liberation theology. “A lot of people are supporting us, particularly young people who want to see a Labour Party that is very different to the Labour Party they have had in the past,” he said. Doubtless a lot of Church of England clergy are praying for him, too: so much left-wing political philosophy derives from lefty-wing applied theology, and there is virtue in philosophical purity even if it means you never get into power.

But would a victory for Jeremy Corbyn necessarily deny Labour any chance of winning the 2020 General Election?

This is not a blog of prophecy, augury, crystal balls or clairvoyancy. But David Cameron is committed to holding a referendum on the UK’s membership of the EU by the end of 2017. He has already declared, whatever the outcome of his renegotiation, that he will campaign to remain in, which will be ‘Yes’ on the ballot paper.

Jeremy Corbyn is no lover of the anti-democratic oligarchs who govern in Brussels, or of the markets which trample the poor under foot. He has heard the weeping and wailing throughout all Greece, and abhors the bankers and monetarists who ride roughshod over the widows and orphans of Athens. Like the ardent Socialists Hugh Gaitskell, Tony Benn, Peter Shore and Michael Foot before him, Jeremy Corbyn stands foursquare in the old tradition of democratic Socialism, which is inherently Eurosceptic because the ‘ever closer union’ of the EEC was always destined to neuter the sovereignty of national parliaments to enact employment legislation and defend the rights of workers. No matter what potency of strike action the trade unions threaten, Parliament is powerless to amend (and often to resist) the diktats from Brussels.

Hence the Unite Union has already weighed into the campaign for Brexit. They dare not say so, but they have heard the complaints of their members not only about austerity, but also the free-moving, low-cost immigrants taking ‘their jobs’. And they understand that so much encroaching ‘Thatcherite’ privatisation – Rail, Royal Mail, NHS – is actually not Tory after all: the origins lie in EU directives which enforce frameworks of cross-border outsourcing and pan-EU competition. No amount of blackouts, uncollected rubbish or unburied bodies can reverse the EEC/EC/EU trajectory of marketisation: only by leaving the collective EU could the British Government ever be free to re-nationalise these industries and hand them back to the people.

Many Socialists are slowly waking up to the relentless zeal of the European Union for social injustice and anti-democratic oppression. Being ‘at the heart’, ‘in the club’, ‘in the fast lane’ or ‘at the top table’ are only worthwhile if the social model and economic framework of the heart/club/lane/table cohere with the basic values, morality and cultural instincts of the people: where there is resentment, there is hostility and hate.

It is axiomatic that democracy yields the governments which the people deserve. The same is true of democratic political parties. Ultimately, it is God who sets up kings and abrogates sovereignty, whether or not His divine sovereignty is acknowledged. But all political authority is partial and imperfect, and the modern era tends to construe all authority as political. Jeremy Corbyn may not be everyone’s cup of tea, but he is no fool. Blairites may joke about his prospects, and Tories can banter about his political deficiencies, his unsavory fraternity of terrorists and the ‘loony left’ extremists with whom he holds court. But if he were to win the Labour leadership, then declare himself an EU ‘Outer’ and campaign for ‘No’; and if the ‘No’ side were to triumph, a humiliated David Cameron would have to resign, and the country would bellow for change. An EU referendum is a long time in politics.

  • The Explorer

    “Democracy yields the government which the people deserve.” No. no, no, democracy yields the people which the government deserves.

    It used to be, if the people disagree with the government, change the government. The modern ideal is if the people disagree with the government, change the people.

    Hence the immigration strategy of Labour here and the Democrats in the States.

    • Jen The Blue

      And the thought/hate crime legislation.

  • Anton

    Corbyn is an honest man, even if his views are economically discredited. But who needs the Labour party now that the Conservative party is led by a man who isn’t conservative?

    • Jen The Blue

      Economically discredited and in the case of his foreign policy beliefs, downright evil.

      • Anton

        Which beliefs, please?

        • Jen The Blue

          His support for the terrorists Hamas who have the stated aim of the destruction of Israel and the killing of Jews.

          Mind, you can say that about many Muslims and by association those who support them.

          Edit: Replaced “most” with “many”.

          • Anton

            I didn’t know about that. I agree with you.

        • The_Average_Joe_UK

          How about squandering 500m to meet his foreign aid mantra?

          • Anton

            Ah, you meant Cameron’s beliefs. No disagreement there. I thought you meant Corbyn’s.

  • Hugh Jeego

    But could Corbyn find enough Labour MPs he would trust to fill a shadow cabinet? I know it’s hard to trust any of one’s fellow-MPs, but in the case of someone as uncompromising as Corbyn, where’s the parliamentary party support going to come from to fill the opposition front-bench?

    • Redrose82

      I can think of two straight away. Dennis Skinner for shadow chancellor and Dianne Abbott for shadow foreign minister.

      • Hugh Jeego

        Bit that’s about it, isn’t it?

      • Aaron D Highside

        Hilarious, Redrose, but I think over Hugh’s head.

        • Hugh Jeego

          Oh I got it alright. I was trying not to be rude about the sizes of their respective backsides 😉

        • Redrose82

          I’ve had another thought. Seeing that there is nothing to stop a member of the upper chamber to serve in the cabinet or it’s shadow, how about Lord Prescott with the education brief?

          • Anton

            In “Lord Prescott with the education brief” are you transposing the last two words as an archaism?

      • Dreadnaught

        Dianne Abbot: Profession? – Woman of Colour.

      • Dominic Stockford

        David Lammy

    • merchantman

      Seriously how do Corbin and the comrades imagine they can rule Britain in 2019? This is not 1945 or 1917.

  • Shadrach Fire

    Your Grace,
    A Labour Party that is true to it’s roots would be a contrast to a Conservative Party that is not conservative. A pity that the Liberal-Democrats were not true to their Whigg heritage. They might have done better in the polls. They all say they are this and that but do something different when elected.
    As a Christian, one might side with with a socialist Labour party for the benefit of the poor but one knows one needs a capitalistic economy to create the economy needed to provide the funds to support a social cause.
    I believe as a Christian we need Government that is ‘conservative’, with a social conscience. Something that no party at present is.

  • carl jacobs

    This situation is unintentionally hilarious. Corbyn was brought in to divide the Left of the Labour Party “broaden the debate.” He wasn’t supposed to win. He was supposed to insure a more centrist victory. And how do you suppose all those hard core True Believers are reacting to the Party leadership as it scrambles to mitigate its own catastrophe.

  • Allyup

    Come on.
    Where does it say that the EU is supposed to be great for the public?

    All today’s political entities and relationships are are really just a simple continuation of the old kings, courtiers, and serfs scenario.
    The titles and dress codes may be different today but little else has changed.
    Replace King and Queen with unelected Political Elite
    Replace courtiers with bureaucrats.
    Replace Rich Mechants looking to buy favours with Unctuous Banks and large businesses.
    Replace the smelly serfs with the EU public.
    Now you have with an almost perfect 1:1 mapping for any century.

    Let’s get real. There is no real world where the serfs can be other than dross no matter how far back or forward you roll the Clock of History:-
    See https://www.opendemocracy.net/can-europe-make-it/marko-bucik/european-union%E2%80%99s-problem-is-substance-not-narrative and
    http://www.vox.com/2014/5/9/5675398/they-saved-the-eurozone-they-just-forgot-to-save-the-people

  • Dreadnaught

    Brexit Brexit? – how skinny latte-hipster are you getting these days – F’Gawds sake Cranny – Leave i’ arhht.

  • Dominic Stockford

    Jolly good, Sir.

  • Inspector General

    What a superb post, Cranmer! You really have a fellow thinking over your every word today…

    You have to be pretty long in the tooth to remember the great resistance that was Trade Union opinion to the then EEC. They could see where it would lead, and it would not be an exaggeration to say that amongst them, the outright hostile and deeply suspicious combined was well over 50% of the assembled. If that stance could be re-awakened now, it would be a tremendous boost to the cause.

    The treatment of Greece, and indeed, the financial incentives so shown to the country to ‘help’ it be a good member of the Reich which has all but finished them off is startling evidence that the EU was never about (the usual poor and down-trodden, yearning for socialism) people. It is everything to do with financial control over people’s lives and people’s countries. That must really stick in a good socialists throat.

    • Anton

      Please note the following change of address:

      Alexis Tsipras
      Government House
      Athens
      Grossdeutschland

      • Inspector General

        OUT OF OFFICE NOTIFICATION
        “Thank you for your call. Unfortunately the Prime Minister has been delayed in Berlin and we don’t know when he’ll be back, if at all”

        • Linus

          Ah, the bitchiness of Christians and losers!

          How can you tell if someone is a Christian? By the bitter and tremulous nature of their imprecations against those who disregard their minority opinions. The rest of us won’t obey your diktats, so we must be abused and insulted as a result.

          It’s this kind of clear and obvious contradiction of the precepts of your own religion that renders your faith so unconvincing.

          Where are all the fruits of the Spirit we’re supposed to be seeing? Where are the kindness, the gentleness, the forbearance and the temperance that the Holy Ghost is supposed to fill you with? Nowhere to be seen in all of your angry yet impotent threats and posturing.

          Wouldn’t a true Christian deal with the feelings of powerlessness and impotence that render you so bitter and make you lash out so angrily against your victorious opponents? Your reactions reveal the completely hollow nature of your faith. You claim the mantle of Christian, while underneath lurks an unregenerate, vengeful and howling pagan.

          You’d better hope this God of yours really is imaginary, because he makes it very clear what happens to those who cry “Lord! Lord!” and then wilfully disobey his commandments. As long as this anger and frustration continue to boil over in acts of bitter recrimination it is CLEAR to anyone with even the dimmest capacity for logical reflection that the Holy Ghost CANNOT be working within you. If it exists, it probably took one look at the seething cauldron of hatred and wounded pride that festers away within your heart and said to itself “Oo er, look at the state of that! No place for me in that stinking mess. Next!”

          • Inspector General

            The Inspector feels your pain, you spiteful old queen. He wishes he could help you, but your miserable carcass repels any assistance.

          • Linus

            Thank you for proving my point. There are no fruits of the Spirit to be found in your heart. How could there be when it’s full of hatred, anger and bitterness?

            If your imaginary God turns out to be real and sends me to hell when I die, it will only be worse when I find you there. Imagine your fury! Here you were thinking you had it made because you cry “Lord! Lord!” But it’s just a façade, isn’t? We all know what lurks underneath.

          • Simon Fay

            Linus – your brand of shrieking gloating is blinding you to the virtue of anything without a hashtag in front of it.

    • Anton

      The German finance minister paid an incognito visit to Greece recently to see how the latest agreement was panning out. The conversation at passport control went like this:

      Name? – Schauble.

      Occupation? – Not yet.

  • Inspector General

    Do we know if Corbyn has a faith? Is he a Christian? One notes that Fallon is now deprecated by Big Gay as it manifests itself as Pink News comments. And he did go out of his way to promise them support. They want nothing to do with him or his party while he’s GOC. The thugs thereon won’t forgive him for his Christianity. They think “it’s not normal” to believe in the existence of the Almighty, and that communicating with the Sky Fairy is a symptom of mental illness. This from practicing homosexual men, remember, who have no shame and obviously no self awareness. They don’t want him coming out with any policies which have been run past God first. Quite understandable of course. God has already shown his disapproval of their lifestyle through his blessing a fair number of them with HIV. Let their honesty in the matter be a warning to those liberal Anglicans who think a deal can be done with the likes of them.

  • David

    Would a traditional Labour Party trigger the re-emergence of a truly conservative Conservative Party, I muse ?
    Speaking as a One Nation Conservative, socially and fiscally conservative, who is now with Ukip, there may be interesting times ahead.
    But the nation’s overriding priority, after turning back to God, must be to exit the accursed and increasingly imperial EU Empire.

    • Jen The Blue

      Just so.

  • Inspector General

    Off topic, but with Cranmer’s indulgence on this important matter…the Christianising of the heathen.

    Powerdaddy, on another thread, has been tugging at the Inspector’s skirt, stamping his feet and crying for proof and evidence of God. Tempting as it is to give him a not too firm backhand, the Inspector will try him at this…

    Now see here Powerdaddy. Much of what we hold dear in science is only ‘proved’ through deduction and calculation. For example, the neutrino. Yes it was imagined, but until they hauled a tank of water a mile below the earth, and watched one pass through said liquid, it was only conjecture. Much the same with the path of electric current, which was formerly thought to pass from positive to negative, and turned out it’s the other way. So if you are looking for evidence of God, bone up on nature and the order it possesses. An order resulting from design, for you cannot have order brought to you from chaos, the alternative to order. There are no more states, it is one or the other.

  • big

    The origins of privatisation i think came from Milton Friedman and the Chicago school and Thatcher positively gulped it down. Corbyn and terrorist support, well what a cheap shot. remember , next time you see Cameron shake hands with the Saudis they pay for ISIS, or Poroshenko, you know who surrounds himself with nazis.whats disturbing is this blog exhorts people to vote for those who support fascists and religious fundamentalists. ie the Conservatives………wow

    • Andy

      Fascists are, by definition, Socialists.

      • big

        keep taking the kool aid.

        • Anton

          What was “Nazi” short for?

          • big

            rich industrialist?

          • Anton

            Nationalsozialistische Deutsche Arbeiterpartei.

          • big

            rich bankers?

    • gelert

      Corbyn supports religious fundamentalists – if they’re Muslim. He also supported IRA terrorists – but that was more political than religious.

  • Anonymous

    If Cameron loses a no vote and resigns, the winners are
    Boris and Farage not Corbyn. I think you forget just how toxic Corbyns non-EU
    policies are to most people.

    • Inspector General

      The idea of Cameron resigning over a point of honour is ludicrous…

      • big

        no honour , no principles , another chancer, and like all conservatives will sell the county, whats, left of it

        • Inspector General

          Unfair of you to judge Conservatism by that scoundrel. Having said that, didn’t vote for them in the GE. This man HAS principles…

          • big

            Not really if the cap fits….. in my book anybody who has voted conservative is a ………. whats that word that begins with T ?

          • Inspector General

            You do disappoint, but one expects you’ve heard that before…

          • big

            actually never, i am finding it extremely thrilling,did you vote UKIP?

          • Inspector General

            Yes UKIP it was. One was always at the back of the Conservative meetings. Near the door, over no EU referendum, you see. But when Cameron announced Same Sex Marriage, one just grabbed his coat and never went back…

          • big

            ……and before UKIP?

          • Inspector General

            You guess. Plenty of clue lying around…

          • big

            actually no ,i dont know.

          • Inspector General

            Goodnight big.

          • big

            …….BNP?……..no far to sensible!…yes i know! …LibDem…..no ……ah ….feck it i give up. night.

          • Inspector General

            Here’s some advice for your young hide, big man. The road to maturity can be a long one, but once you get there you will never look back.

          • big

            ……and here’s some advice for you dont vote for people who sell the country out ! as i said if the cap fits…….

          • Anton

            You pinched Cameron’s coat?

      • Orwell Ian

        Quite so. If Comrade Corbyn is elected and the humiliation of a lost referendum becomes inevitable, Mr Slippery would find a way out of holding it. We would wake up the next morning to learn that the EU had miraculously declared it illegal, letting him off the hook and showering him in rose petals.

  • Dudes

    Where’s yanis varoufakis around that cabinet table? Surely – being a darling of the left- he’d be made a Lord and chief Secretary to the treasury in a far left government? Don’t forget as an eu citizen he could be part of HM Government.

    PS Labour is mad if they don’t elect Liz Kendall. But you can help them by paying less than 10 Marlboro lights to vote for Jeremy Corbyn.

    • big

      why not , i am glad to see our Russell is in the photo.

      • Inspector General

        That man is a degenerate. You seriously admire?

        • big

          is there a special school/ college to study how to hate?

          • Inspector General

            A leading question. But why? Has your world been compromised tonight?

          • big

            Why do you dislike him,why?

          • Inspector General

            How long have you got…

          • big

            All night

          • Inspector General

            This man hasn’t. But let’s start off with him being an ex heroin addict. He’s damn lucky to still be alive. And all it takes is for some deep personal setback tomorrow and he’ll be back on the stuff. That’s how it operates, that wicked substance. Hardly a role model then…

          • big

            ……… and?

          • S&A

            He’s a misogynist, and a hypocrite. He spent the first 38 years of his life as a hedonist, and what is left of his drug-addled brain is set on permanent send.

            He’s an attention whore on an ego-trip, and even when he’s given some soft questions on how he’d make his ‘revolution’ work he goes into a meltdown. And he’s also stupid enough to tell people not to vote, and then to tell them to vote Labour after it’s too late to get yourself on the electoral register.

            Is that enough for you?

          • big

            …….. eh no…..the author of this blog exhorts people to vote conservative now thats what i call seriously stupid ! hey you people never, ever learn. you would be well advised to follow Peter……the trotskyist…born again Cof E, and all round conservative……Hitchens advise , oh forget the part about the “vote for UKIP” thing….. it wont get you far ….. byeeeee

          • S&A

            Send key setting, over.

          • big

            …..yawn…..zzzzzzzzz….ah thats better…zzzzzzzzz

      • Sam

        “Russell”, has no consistent political principles, as we saw during the elections, but he hardly presents as a man of the traditional far left, more anarchist than democratic socialist. At least the other far left politicians do actually have sincerely held political principles (even if I think they’re utter bull).

        • big

          good ,well said ,well done the first person not to go into hate mode.

    • Inspector General

      Ah, Telegram Sam (now that’s a bit before your time)

      Through you, the Inspector will advise all that Pink News interviewed Kendall at

      “Interview: Liz Kendall wants to be a ‘warrior’ for LGBT rights”

      Usual socialist Utopia clap trap. Be kind to kittens, that kind of thing…

      • Sam

        Dude

        Telegram? Gay rights are going to be quite bog standard feature of left centre parties. Liz Kendall is the best of a bad bunch, she apparently runs 8 miles a day ( wonder if she runs around evington and highfields in her Leicester constituency ) and has said Labour shouldn’t have voted to recognise Palestine. Burnham is a plastic pretty boy, Cooper is too connected to the Blair years and Corbyn is a far left fanatic.

  • Trojan

    Corbyn on a Brexit ticket -despite what else may be wrong about him – would be a winner. But once in No 10 who among the very loony leftists within the party would hold ministerial appointments?

    • big

      Our russell……..the minister for revolution,or he could be the anti TINA minister……

  • The Masked Marvel

    Jeremy Corbyn is no lover of the anti-democratic oligarchs who govern in Brussels…

    Perhaps not. But he is a lover of anti-democratic totalitarians elsewhere.

    Make no mistake, Your Grace, Corbyn may not truly split the Labour party (indeed, the vast majority of members seem to be gagging for it), but he will divide the country, and in an ugly fashion not seen in decades.

  • chiefofsinners

    The appeal of Corbyn is that he will unite the left, winning back those lost to the greens, UKIP and wee Jimmy Krankie.

  • Corbin is an unreconstructed communist. Cunning too. I can see enough of the benefit claiming deficit denying classes and Muslim block vote putting him into number 10 in 2020.

    His government will have 8 key policies.

    Tax, spend, tax, borrow, spend,regulate, Islamicise and tax.

  • S&A

    The problem with this thesis is that if an EU referendum is divisive for the Conservative party, a reversion to the Bennite policy on Europe would cause a shitstorm on the British left.

    Corbyn can have endorsed a united Ireland (united on the IRA’s terms), called for the Falklands to be handed over to Argentina, demand the abolition of Trident (and indeed HM armed forces), and become a fanboy for a militia currently providing death squads for Assad, and he will be praised for his ‘sincerity’.

    But the moment he backs Brexit he will cause panic in the Grindie crowd, lose friends with the Beeb, and also ruin any chance of a common front with the SNP and the Greens (the only viable political allies he has outside Labour).

    If you bear in mind the fact that even Alex Tsipras and Syriza want to stay in the Eurozone you should note here that the chance of a leftist challenge to the EU is a pipedream.

    • big

      …….more yawn ….. as i said never learn!

  • Hmm … By 2020 Corbyn will be 71 years old. Okay, that was ageist and Moses was in his 80’s when he led Israel out of Egypt but he had God’s help rather than the trades unions. Would he be the oldest new Prime Minister ever? Yes, he’s vegetarian, doesn’t drink and rides a bike to work, but even so. Plus, he’s been married 3 times.

    • He’s well qualified then! Just the right age to be a Prime Ministerial candidate really.

      • No mandatory retirement for MP’s then. Marie. Goes with their recent 10% wage increase.

        The mandatory retirement age for Judges is 70 years, with a power of extension year-on-year to an age limit of 75. In the Church of England the compulsory retirement age is 70 for all clergy. In the Roman Catholic Church, there is a mandatory retirement age of 70 for priests and 75 for bishops and archbishops; the Pope excepted, as he holds that position for life.

        If elected, Corbyn would be 76 years old at the end of his first term.

        • Anton

          “the Pope excepted, as he holds that position for life.”

          Benedict XVI?

          • Voluntarily retired; not mandatory. Some hope Pope Francis will follow suit and go ‘early’. He’s 78 years of age.

          • Anton

            It’s now become clear that Pope Francis is very defined by the fascist junta which he stood principledly against, just as John Paul 2 was defined by his anti-communism. And Francis has let himself be very badly advised (by a pantheist called Schellnhuber) about manmade global warming (scale unproven) and the environment (socialism is not the answer, for pollution was worse in communist lands). But of all the Popes in my lifetime he’s probably the one with deepest concern for the poor and the one I’d most enjoy a beer with.

          • Because he’s left in his politico-economic thinking doesn’t mean he cares any more for the poor than John Paul II or Benedict XVI before him. And rumour has it he does enjoy the occasional drink or two.

          • Anton

            I agree it’s hard to get an impression of personality from pronouncements and from the media. Nevertheless he’s my Pope to drink beer with. I hope he is willing to contemplate married priests.

          • Jack is sure he is willing to contemplate many things. As for drinking buddies, one can think of better.

        • JC doesn’t seem that old and if he’s got good health, motivation and energy which he seems to have bucket loads of then I don’t see why he can’t lead the Labour party. He can teach the youngsters a thing or two. It would be different if he were like some elderly folk in the HoL who spend the afternoon snoozing instead of debating.

          • If you’re still a socialist at his age, Marie, then there’s something significantly amiss. Conservatives improve with age; socialists go sour.

  • bluedog

    A fine post, Your Grace, and one which reflects the adoration of the Corbyn which seems to be taking hold in so many unexpected places. Is it just that his initials are JC? Or is there more to it?
    Without question, JC is an absolutist in an era when opinion polls and focus groups determine politics, philosophy and economics in a relative sense. No wonder the Blairites are in disarray, how could a Labour politician who believes in socialism have survived the purges of the nineties and naughties? Corbynism is an exercise in the purest pre-Wilsonian nostalgia. If Corbyn were to say he was the Heir to Nye Bevan, this communicant would believe him, because it would undoubtedly be the truth. A Corbyn Labour party has the potential to destroy the remnants of the Lib-Dems, many of whose adherents are closet Corbynites. Corbyn could also prove fatal to the UKIP campaign to win the blue-collar vote. One can almost hear the sigh of relief as the working class plans its return to Labour.
    You are right to perceive the threat to Cameron that Corbyn could present too, both in the specifics of the EU and in the general style of the man with his unfamiliar conviction. The only Conservative politician who could match Corbyn in terms of conviction and integrity is of course, John Redwood.
    Brexit is getting closer.

  • Mike Stallard

    The EU is moving fast towards a new constitution which will give the Commission a lot more power and reduce all countries to “States”. (Spinelli document). Within the new Federal Democratic Rebublic of Europe, we will have about as much power on the “Top Table” as, say Cyprus or Malta, and a lot less than France or Poland. I am so glad that the Labour Unions are beginning to see this. I had not expected them to be clever enough: I was apparently wrong.

    • Linus

      Malta or Cyprus? Don’t exaggerate. Greece at the very least! Or perhaps Portugal…

      It’s this kind of mindless xenophobic rhetoric that will finally persuade the British to stay in the EU, I predict. People will see how brutish, myopic and prejudiced those campaigning for an exit really are. And as the strong pound starts to sap your economy, they’ll realise that Britain is stronger inside Europe than outside it.

      The government will campaign hard for a Yes vote. And with no credible opposition, I think they’ll win it with a comfortable margin.

      The SNP lost their referendum even though they were well organised and well led. With the only figurehead of the No vote on Europe being that gurning fool Farage, and a few Tory dinosaurs with about as much charisma between them as a bank manager in a grey suit, the chances of a Brexit look slim to me. And then imagine the impotent rage that will be expressed on this blog! Same-sex marriage will be as nothing in comparison. The Inspector and few other radical Euroskeptics will probably explode!

      Perhaps it will be a good thing. A meltdown might force them to confront themselves, and radical repentance may then be possible.

      Or maybe not. Maybe they’ll just disappear up their own tailpipes in anger and thwarted frustration. Or they may refuse to recognize the result and just unilaterally declare that Britain is no longer in the EU. Only it will be, and they’ll just be pretending it isn’t, a bit like they pretend there’s no such thing as equal marriage and women bishops…

      • bluedog

        ‘And as the strong pound starts to sap your economy, they’ll realise that Britain is stronger inside Europe than outside it.’
        Oh dear. The strength of Sterling reflects the strength of the British economy and this demand for Sterling keeps British interest rates low, thus setting up a virtuous circle that further stimulates the economy. If Britain being ‘inside Europe’ means inside the EMU, the British economy could be predicted to wither like the rest of the EMU basket cases.
        Not so long ago we were being told that Britain was a muddy little island that had no future either in or out of the EU. Now the US president is ordering us to stay in the EU and it seems that the French maybe worried by the prospect of facing the Boche alone. Things change so quickly, these days.

        • Mike Stallard

          Indeed.
          What Linus does not address is the fact that the EU is morphing rapidly into something else. Staying in or Brexit is no longer the choice.

          • Anton

            Why no longer the choice?

          • Mike Stallard

            You asked…

            The people who run the EU, the five presidents, the intellectuals – Guy Verhofstadt, Danny Cohn Bendit and 100 or so MEPs have produced a document which is called the Spinelli document. It proposes a revision of the Lisbon Treaty which will turn Europe into a Federal Democratic Republic.

            The Eurozone members will be at the centre of this new State, and there are pre-Euro members too.

            What Norway, Switzerland, perhaps Turkey, are being offered is Associate Membership with limited voting rights.

            Great Britain is seen as a special case with not much attention given to it.

            So we have a choice: associate membership, which is vague, pre-Euro membership for if we are thinking of joining the eurozone, or else complete union which will result in our being a State within the European federation.

            The commission will get more power and the four freedoms will be there just the same.

            So “Brexit” and “IN or “OUT are not any longer the answers. And, by the way, this is based on a constitutional Congress which is sitting now and which is due to report in 2017.

            If you want to read all about it, please see here:

            http://www.eureferendum.com/documents/fundamentallaw.pdf

            If you want to follow the developments, the best place is here:

            http://www.eureferendum.com

            I do hope that helps. The European papers are full of the new constitution.

          • Anton

            I knew some of that, but thank you. There will now be various grades of IN, but Brexit is still an alternative – and the sooner the better. I’m old enough to remember Danny “the Red” Cohn-Bendit leading the French student rioters in 1968 on TV. The workers at the Renault factory had more sense than to follow that particular set of longhairs. But they’re back…

        • Linus

          Like all modern economies, Britain depends on exports for growth. A strong currency hits exporters hard. Too strong for too long and export markets start to dry up.

          Inside the euro Britain would have unfettered access to a market where currency fluctuations would not destroy demand. Of course a successful euro demands more political integration, which the current crisis is in the process of delivering whether xenophobic and small-minded populations like it or not.

          Europe would be more balanced with the British on the inside rather than the outside. A counterweight to German dominance is needed. But whether Britain remains a part of Europe or not, integration will happen. The only alternative is the break-up of the EU and a return to individual competing nation states, none of which will be able to facr the challenges of the 21st century alone. The rise of China and the corresponding fall of the US, along with Islamic militancy and terrorism, need coordinated responses. Only a united Europe can do this.

          If Britain leaves then so be it. But you’ll live to regret it. Maybe we should send all your retirees back. Deporting a few hundred thousand old age British pensioners who currently clutter up the French countryside, contribute little and drain valuable resources from our health system would free up so much housing that homelessness would be wiped out overnight.

          • bluedog

            ‘A counterweight to German dominance is needed. ‘

            No, the re-partition of Germany (into four units of 20m each) is needed so that German economic power is not concentrated within a single political unit. Once the French understand that option and implement it as policy, the UK can safely leave the EU to its fate.

          • carl jacobs

            The solution to failure in competition is not “Break your opponent’s kneecaps “

          • The Explorer

            The solution to the problem of pickpockets: abolish pockets. (G K Chesterton).

            Admittedly, in an ideal world, improving one’s own productivity is the solution to failure in competition. BUt disabling the opposition would also have a levelling effect.

          • carl jacobs

            Sure. Just like stealing is an easier way to make a living than getting a job. The latter sounds suspiciously like work.

            Fortunately, I know you are kidding. 😉

          • IanCad

            I must note though, Carl, that the USA still has nearly forty thousand troops in Germany.
            Just in case the Teutons start feeling their oats again?!

          • bluedog

            In ideal world, true. But when the competition is uneven by virtue of one party being an overwhelming demographic and political entity (a virtual monopoly) it becomes necessary to level the playing field. The Germans seem to recognise the problem and try very hard not to be dominant and domineering. But they just can’t help themselves. The solution offered is a kindness and helps the Germans out of their evident embarrassment.

          • The Explorer

            Britain’s current presence in the EU doesn’t seem to be making much difference to German dominance.

      • The Explorer

        You seem to want Britain to stay in the EU. Given how much you appear to dislike it (the English part of it, anyway) I’d have thought you’d be delighted if Britain departed.

        Islamic militancy? Chicken-Little alarmism. “The sky is falling! Squawk!”

        • Inspector General

          All LGBT advancement has come through the EU.

          • The Explorer

            Am I right that Germany has civil partnerships, but not SSM? Hitler funded pacifism in Britain, I believe, but banned it in Germany. Same sort of thing?

          • Inspector General

            Yes, the Germans won’t have SSM. Over on PN, it’s Putin who is the villain of the peice, but strangely not Merkel.

    • IanCad

      “—-and reduce all countries to “States”
      A horrifying prospect, and, not without precedent.
      In the early days of the American Republic, states were regarded by their populaces as “Countries.”
      Witness Robert E. Lee’s response when rejecting the offer of the military leadership of the Northern States (Aggressors): “I must fight for my country.” And so the principled gentleman went down to Virginia and there led the vastly outnumbered Confederate States in their glorious resistance.
      When we become states in the thrall of the EU beast, then we may wake up.

  • Linus

    One is in two minds when it comes to the Labour Party.

    Of course their unremitting support for LGBT issues counts very much in their favour. They taught the Conservatives that homophobic parties can no longer win elections, and can therefore be credited with the transformation of British politics. This is a good thing and one is grateful to them. Without Foote and Kinnock and Blair and Brown, there could be no Cameron as we know him. So well done Labour!

    Unfortunately you cannot elect a government based solely on its track record of support for equal rights. Labour’s economic policy is out of touch with conditions in the real world and can only lead to disaster if they’re elected and start to undermine markets with their ill-judged interventionism.

    The Labour Party members who vote in leadership contests tend to be the most radicalised in terms of their socialist fervour. They’re quite capable of chosing a leader who, as far as the general public is concerned, is unelectable. We’ve just seen that happen with Miliband, and it now seems possible that it could happen once again with Corbyn. In which case Cameron’s position is assured well into the foreseeable future, with his Dauphin Osborne following him. If you stay in Europe and your economy prospers, Labour will be wiped out as a credible opposition party and Britain will become a virtual one party state.

    None of this will be bad for the LGBT community, but it might be bad for democracy. Absolute power corrupts absolutely, and Osborne has a hard glint in his eye that makes me think he’s the sort of politician who needs to be constrained by a credible opposition otherwise things may get very totalitarian very quickly.

    Time will tell who Labour will choose as its next leader. I hope for the sake of democracy in your country that they opt for someone electable and capable of forming a real opposition.

    • gelert

      How strange that the left blindly support followers of a religion that is militantly homophobic, as well as being misogynistic and anti-democratic.

      It’s also anti-Semitic but I understand that is in line with current leftist beliefs.

      • Manfarang

        The left tend to support followers of the Catholic Church. United Ireland and all that. According to one report, Catholics were found to be the most left-wing of Christian groups and more pro-welfare than Anglicans, who were said to be more authoritarian in their political values.

        • The Explorer

          I suspect gelert had a religious system other than Catholicism in mind.

          • Manfarang

            One in countries and places he has never lived in or been to.

          • The Explorer

            That’s for him to answer. I have no idea either way.

    • Inspector General

      Come on then, what ‘equal rights’ are you still missing?

      • Linus

        Like I said, between them, Labour and the Conservatives have delivered pretty well on promises of equality. There are still some advances to be made in, such as equal marriage in Northern Ireland, but on the whole, legal equality is real enough for most UK citizens.

        Still, is equality enough? Perhaps the LGBT community should be given MORE rights than anyone else in guise of compensation for all the wrongs that have been done to us over the centuries.

        How about a deduction at source of all firstborn children of opposite sex couples for adoption by same-sex couples? That might redress the balance. Or perhaps a place of worship attendance tax paid to LGBT charities that would target the worst offenders (homophobic Christians, Jews and Muslims) rather than making everyone pay. Fines for all parents whose children use the word “gay” in a pejorative manner might also be a good idea. Repeat offenders could work off their debt in bonded servitude helping to built counseling centres for LGBT individuals traumatised by all the abuse that gets hurled at us.

        Of course I can think of many more possibilities, but that will be enough to start with. And if, as a result of these new measures, certain turkey-necked Internet blog commenters keel over in a fit of apoplexy, well so much the better.

        If I speak to Mr Corbyn, I’m sure he’ll deliver on any or all of these suggestions when he’s elected. So I may as well go the whole hog and demand equal representation for the LGBT community in the royal family.

        There you go Harry! We’ll get Tom Daley to dump his American boyfriend and you’ll be all set! How does the title of Duke and Duke Consort of Soho sound? After all, he’s on record as saying he might give men a try if it didn’t work out with his dippy blonde. And it didn’t…

        • The Explorer

          Do you think Mr Corby would want to keep the royal family?

          • Linus

            All Labour politicians go gaga for the queen. The more socialist they are, the more gaga they go. She clearly puts something in their tea at the weekly audience. Some kind of psychotropic substance that renders them loyal and malleable. Corbyn will be no exception, unless the gigantic dose of whatever it is she uses (ketamine, perhaps?) makes him keel over and fall off his perch.

            But he’ll be yes, ma’am, no ma’am, three bags full ma’aming the old bat like they all do within a week of taking office. You’ll see…

          • The Explorer

            You’re not a sprig of the monarchy, are you? More successful in rebellion than Labour politicians?

          • Linus

            Your monarchy is your problem. Since we got rid of ours, we’ve never looked back, but you’re perfectly free to keep yours if you want to. Just as we’re perfectly free to laugh it for the ridiculous and pompous charade it is.

            I don’t think Britain will become a republic any time soon. But once Old Ma Mountbatten has popped her clogs, and Charles has whined and moaned his way to the verge of being deposed, and William has tired of that sleek hairdo he married and dumped her for something resembling a horse (like father, like son), and Harry has shacked up with Tom Daley and they’ve started a family via surrogacy, the British public may wake up to the disadvantages of an hereditary system and quietly opt for an elected head of state.

            Let’s see where things are in 20 years time, shall we?

          • The Explorer

            Do I take it that’s a no?

          • Show a bit of respect for our Monarchy Linus. having an elected head of state is boring. A Royal family are much more interesting and add value to a country. .

          • The Explorer

            I suspect Linus is a disreputable scion of the Royal Family. Something like the Victorian Prince Eddy whom people suspected (probably unfairly) of being Jack the Ripper. Too disreputable, anyway, to be contained in England; so they sent him to France where no one would notice.

          • Linus

            Your monarchy is worthy of no respect. What does the royal family do? Wave? Smile inanely and pose for photos? Wear designer clothes and look silly in them? What a waste of time, effort and money.

            Anyone who can be interested in the farce of royalty clearly doesn’t have much going on in their life.

            The queen is bad enough, but at least she has a job of sorts acting as a rubber stamp for the government. But there’s no excuse for the rest of them. William and his plastic and coiffured wife are particularly annoying with their cheesy grins (I’d be smiling like a Cheshire cat on crack too if the government had just picked up the bill for my multi-million pound refurbishments), and their banal high street chic.

            Of course if you want to waste your money on such irrelevancies, it’s your privilege to do so. But don’t pretend they’re anything more than they really are: an ordinary family sponging off a state that funds their luxurious lifestyle in exchange for no useful or productive work whatsoever. And don’t complain when others laugh at you for putting up with such wasteful and anachronistic nonsense.

            Having a crowned pantomime at the head of your state makes you look utterly ridiculous. But if that’s a look you’re happy with, then carry on as you are.

          • The Explorer

            Get rid of the monarchy so that you can have the joy of something like Hollande.

          • Linus

            The personality of the president of the Republic is of no consequence. What counts is that he has been democratically elected to head the state. Sovereignty in France resides with the people, who delegate the exercise of it to representatives of their choice. Sovereignty in Britain resides with a old woman whose only qualification for doing the job is an accident of birth, and who lets others exercise it on her behalf in exchange for pots of money and as much gin and Dubonnet as she can drink. I know which system I prefer.

          • The Explorer

            Isn’t it a depressing thought that Hollandewas the end result of a deliberate process? I think his problems go rather deeper than his personality.

          • Linus

            Hollande is only president because he had the good luck to be running against Sarkozy, who committed the cardinal sin of being flashy and vulgar while in office and who became, as a result, virtually unelectable.

            We like our politicians to be sober, elegant and discrete. Unfortunately none of them are at the moment. But they’re still preferable to an old granny with half a ton of bullion on her head and nothing intelligent to say.

          • The Explorer

            She’s not YOUR granny, is she?

          • Linus

            If she were my grandmother, she would have had to give birth to a daughter in the early 1930s. As she was less than 10 years old at the time, unless Windsor women are VERY early developers, I don’t think it’s likely. Do you?

          • The Explorer

            They’re philoprogenitive, you know, these Royals. (Perhaps you DO know, and we’re witnessing a family quarrel.)

          • Linus

            Ah, so this is why the British love their royal rabble so much. It’s all the juicy gossip about their extracurricular activities that animates your passion for them, isn’t it? A royal reality show. Uglier Kardashians with clunkier diamonds.

            I can’t comment on how many illegitimate children any given member of your paltry dynasty may (or may not) have left strewn across Europe. All I can comment on is the unassailable certainty of my own paternity. My close physical resemblance to the man named on my birth certificate as my father puts paid to any attempt to besmirch my mother’s honour with accusations of adultery. But nothing stops a Christian on a mission to undermine and discredit a critic of his faith, does it?

            Is this what you call being a warrior for Christ? I didn’t know you could get to heaven by scratching someone else’s eyes out.

          • The Explorer

            Lighten up, old chap. There’s an element of badinage on here. We’re allowed for some of our comments to be tongue in cheek.

          • The Royal family is head of the diplomatic services, tourism and commerce Linus. Yes, even Prince Philip with his gaffes makes people laugh. They are our culture and part of our Identity. They do a lot for charities and champion causes that need bringing to wider public attention, such as Princess Diana and the landmines cause, and the AIDS charities she supported, and now Prince Harry and the Invictous games

            They are role models for many people and a welcome distraction and entertainment for others.

            They are a normal family so I guess that’s why you don’t like them.

          • Linus

            France has no monarchy and we’re the world’s number one tourist destination. Get rid of your spongers and their palaces and castles will still be there. That’s what people want to see. Not all the comic opera pageantry. In fact tourist numbers may even rise, as the properties would be open to the public all year round, instead of being closed most of the time because of the current infestation of unproductive and blood-sucking parasites.

            There is no convincing practical argument in favour of monarchy. It all depends on emotional appeals to “identity”. In other words, you like what you know and any kind of innovation is anathema. An attitude well illustrated by your hostility to equal marriage.

            When it comes to the monarchy, there’s no reason to suppose that the British want to change the current system. In which case the world’s most dysfunctional “normal” family will continue to spend your money to fund their lavish lifestyles, laughing all the way to the bank, and then on to the couturier, where plans will be laid for the next acid green or shocking pink ensemble to be foisted on the nation in a fresh explosion of pantomime dame chic. Your choice, your problem. But don’t expect the rest of us to treat your crowned buffoons with anything except the derision they deserve. Circus clowns do a more noteworthy job of public utility, and at least they don’t mind being laughed at.

          • We in Britain love pomp and pageantry and put on world class displays. Other countries copy us.
            We follow the Royals of other countries too and I look forward to the day Russia re-installs the Romanov family as their Royals.

            So time for you to piss off back to Pink News Linus. You don’t add anything of value to this blog only insults.

            NB to The Inspector, Please don’t drag back any more raving homosexuals from Pink News and wherever else you go to stir up the s***..

          • Linus

            Pomp and pageantry? Comic opera buffoonery, more like. From your “royal” family. And vulgar abuse from you, the flower of English womanhood.

            It wasn’t you slumped on my doorstep in Paris in a pile of vomit with your skirt hitched up around your waist a few weeks ago was it? The language that Englishwoman was drunkenly slurring was eerily similar to yours, with a few “f*!§ offs” thrown in for good measure. A bucket of cold water sent her on her way screaming more incoherent insults. Pity the same approach doesn’t work online.

          • Lovely area you live in there Linus.
            Sorry to disappoint you, but no I wasn’t that Gin soaked whore on your doorstep, I’m neither of those and never have been. The odd swear word now and then adds emphasis I feel.

            You’re steeped in ignorance and entrenched in a narrow minded tunnel vision unable to see the positives and good our Royal family does for Britain.

          • Linus

            The area I live in is called “le centre de Paris”. It’s full of vomiting English tourists whose sole aim in life is to sink as much booze as they can and then regurgitate it in the nearest doorway, either before or after they’ve urinated in the same spot. This is the reality of your nation’s culture as exported to your nearest neighbours. And I’m sure it makes you proud to be British.

            Your halfwit royals probably inspire similar feelings of patriotism. Granny Mountbatten and Phil(anderer) the Greek and their motley collection of odd-looking children struggle to raise anything except a laugh outside the UK however. And the various strange grandchildren produced by all those inappropriate and doomed-to-fail marriages just make it all the more entertaining.

            You have the princesses Toothy and Dumpy and their penchant for wearing toilet seats and pot plants on their heads, the cross-eyed Wessex progeny, and Hooray Harry and his Vegas porn shoot. In comparison, Anne the Man’s children seem reasonably normal, so full marks to her for choosing a sire who could compensate for the genetic shortcomings of the dam, and for keeping the resulting colt and filly well away from titles and privilege.

            And then there’s Wills and his insipid wife. Mr and Mrs Middle-of-the-road, on whom all hopes for the future are pinned. They’re so bland and picture perfect, one could almost think they’d been especially bred for the task of cutting ribbons and smashing bottles of French wine over British ships. “What’s behind the plastic stick-on smiles?” one asks one’s self. Or are they hollow inside like Barbie dolls or robots, perhaps being remotely controlled from a bunker under Buckingham Palace, on a mission to get out there and bore the public into submission. Coma victims don’t ask questions, so those two mediocre individuals, indeed the whole family, can continue to bank huge sums of public money in return for very little work.

            Still, you have to give it to them. The Mountbattens are, despite their parvenu origins, a very crafty family. Almost as crafty as the Kardashians. Next thing you know one of them will be transitioning from male to female in an attempt to broaden the appeal of the monarchy to young people and the liberal left. No openly gay couples yet. They missed a trick when they married the youngest brother (whose name I can never remember) to a woman instead of the burly Marines drill sergeant he was rumoured to prefer. But they’ll make up for it soon enough. Anne the Man could always shack up with Sandi Toksvig. A more convincing lesbian couple would be harder to find. Or perhaps Harry might swear off brain-dead blondes and find true love with one of his Invictus champions, so they can cover the gay and handicapped bases with one strike, and ensure their family’s survival into the foreseeable future.

            One thing is sure however. While you British are gawping at them and bowing and scraping to them, they’re sure of a well-paid and cushy job at your expense. You’re more than happy to kick destitute mothers and their ten children out of their council homes to starve in the gutter in order to save pennies on your welfare bill. And you hand millions over to a family of freeloaders because of “tradition” and “the royals do soooo much for us”.

            What, exactly? Shhhh! Don’t enquire too closely, or the queen’s new clothes might start to look a bit transparent…

          • Good Lord! What a negative, depressing rant you miserable old queen Linus you sound like you’ve had too much of the Absinthe.

            I’ll have you know the British Royal Family are loved in many many
            countries around the world and Britain would be nothing without them.
            Most of them do work hard especially Princess Ann who is not a lesbian and nether is Edward a homosexual so dream on.

            They have secured their future in case you hadn’t noticed, and in the normal way too. Wills and Kate are a decent and delightful young family who are far from boring, a rarity in these modern times of ever increasing deviancy.

            You can keep your vicious, maudlin and drunken rantings to yourself thank you.

          • Linus

            Your wish is not my command. I’ll keep expressing my opinions as long as the people who run this blog let me do so, or until I get bored with talking to a bunch of reactionary cavemen (and women) and leave of my own accord.

            Either way, the knowledge that you want me to “go away” has absolutely no effect on me whatsoever. Why should it? Who are you to tell me what to do?

          • Powerdaddy

            What is wrong with these people?

            I have given Albert an example of a non viable pregenancy that will kill both the mother and the baby if allowed to continue. The option to save at least the mother through abortion is open to him, but he says both should die.
            ?

          • Linus

            Religious obsession is wrong with them. It turns rational human beings into gibbering dogmatists willing to go as far as sacrificing other people’s lives to their beliefs. We see it every day on the news in reports from the Middle East. Why should it surprise you here? If radical Muslims can throw gay people off tall towers, why be surprised when radical Christians condemn pregnant women to die?

          • Powerdaddy

            I don’t know. I find the whole situation bizarre. Morals logic and human decency shot to fck, and for what?
            It’s the weirdness that draws me in….

          • Linus

            What are morals, logic and human decency compared to power? That’s what motivates these people. That’s what motivates all narcissistic personality types. An unshakeable belief in their own divine right to rule the world, made all the more unshakeable by being projected onto a perfected image of themselves called god.

            I don’t find it weird so much as pitiful and faintly embarrassing. They’re like 90 pound weaklings pretending to be Charles Atlas. That in itself isn’t weird. We all want more power than we’ve got, and the most powerless more so than anybody. It’s just that the disconnect between their pretensions and the reality of their situation is so enormous that you wonder how any healthy mind can delude itself to that degree. Mental illness is sad rather than weird.

          • I’m not learning anything much from your comments.
            OK so you are anti Royal family there’s no need to be quite so nasty. How long have you harboured this hatred and why?

            Have you met any and were they less than polite to you?

          • Linus

            You read “nasty” into my comments because I disagree with you, which by definition makes me evil and therefore full of hatred, because of course your opinions are absolute truth, aren’t they? So anyone who disagrees with them can be dismissed as a hater.

            The Mountbatten clan lives off public money and is therefore subject to public criticism. Each of my comments reflects a widely held opinion about their performance, which as it is funded by the public, is open to criticism by the public. They are not above criticism.

          • You show your nasty streak with all the names you call them, only you contradict yourself. In one post you’re labelling them all halfwits, then towards the end of it you’re calling the family crafty for being able to hang on to their jobs and status.

            You’ve got it into your head that our Royal family are posh scroungers, and that they are not value for money, but that’s far from the truth. They bring in £500 million alone in tourism.

            Ask yourself would tourists come to see the residency of an ageing grey President in a grey suit? I think not. Who is your representative in France again? I only know of Hollande. And as for visiting the Eiffel tower, I did and was disappointed Blackpool Tower is better! And the French are very rude indeed.

            Here for your perusal: Finances of the British Royal Family.

            https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Finances_of_the_British_Royal_Family

          • Linus

            I see monarchists are just as deluded as Christians…

            How do you explain France’s huge tourist trade? We’re a republic. We have an aging grey president in a grey suit. And yet more people visit this country than any other in the world. According to you, that shouldn’t be so. They should all be going to England to gawp at your queen.

            What draws in the tourists is architectural patrimony. Tourists come to France to see Paris and Versailles and the châteaux of the Loire valley. And they go to England to see Buckingham Palace, Windsor Castle and the Tower of London, all of which will still be there when the Mountbattens have been sent packing.

            They cost you millions, bring in little or nothing in return, and have no saving graces except perhaps to boost the millinery trade. Get rid of them! You know you want to…

          • You’re stubborn as well as infuriating. NO we don’t want to get rid of them.

          • Linus

            The time will come when you realize you’re being ripped off by a bunch of idle freeloaders.

            Buckingham Palace would make great condos. Open the state rooms to the public and then convert the rest of it into apartments. Same with Windsor Castle. Let the Mountbattens keep their private estates. There’s no reason to guillotine them or send them into exile, although they may prefer to take the money and run off to a tax haven somewhere. Monaco maybe, if the Grimaldis would have them, although its doubtful they’d want the competition for column inches in Paris Match and Hello! Magazine.

            In the meantime, the soap opera carries on. British newspapers are full of Waity Katie’s lacquered hair and her cute children’s whimsical antics, while William pretends to do a proper job flying a helicopter once or twice a week, but only when the paparazzi are on hand to record the event for posterity. Mrs Mountbatten keeps on doing her best impersonation of a wizened Haribo bonbon. Phil the Greek slips into senility. Charles and Camilla slowly turn browner and more leathery than ever while doing their utmost to claw a few column inches back from the ever-popular Cambridges. And the junior ones just go off on endless tropical holidays and hang about looking dumpy and pointless. And you Brits lap it all up like the sickly sweet pap it is. What a diet!

          • Yes we do and I happen to think most of them are very good value for money.

            And since you mention it why doesn’t France make more of an effort and put up the refugees in Versailles that huge empty palace outside Paris then we wouldn’t have them trying to get into our small country?

          • Linus

            The migrants want to go to Britain because they can easily find work there without having to provide any proof of their identity or their right to be in the country. If you weren’t so lax about that kind of thing, they wouldn’t be clamouring to get in.

            Here in France it’s impossible to get a job or claim benefits unless you’re properly documented.

            It’s a considerable nuisance to us to have to deal with all these migrants lining up to get into the free-for-all that is Britain. If it were up to me, I’d put up a big sign with a big arrow and the words “this way to your cut-price El Dorado” and just wave them through. Why should we do the job of policing your borders for you? They’re only flooding in because you make it so easy for them to stay once they get there. Sort yourselves out rather than blaming all your woes on everyone but yourselves.

            But that’s just typical behaviour for the British, isn’t it? It’s always everyone else’s fault, never yours.

        • “Still, is equality enough? Perhaps the LGBT community should be given MORE rights than anyone else in guise of compensation for all the wrongs that have been done to us over the centuries.”

          Carry on in this vein and you’ll be back in prison!

          • Linus

            Back in prison? Never been there, although clearly that’s where you’d like to see me.

            Good thing for me you’re part of a marginalised minority enjoying little or no power. I’m safe from your ill wishes, but by all means keep on wishing them if it helps you to manage your frustration.

          • The Explorer

            I doubt she meant you personally. I suspect she was referring to the days when homosexuality was illegal. ‘Ballad of Reading Gaol’ sort of thing.

        • Inspector General

          Political types who follow Cranmer must surely see in you their mistake in promoting everything LGBT activists demand. For there is no end to it. You will never get the long cherished goal of reducing the male age of consent to 14 so you people can revive pederasty but that doesn’t stop you from trying.

          • Linus

            Nobody’s going to go anywhere near the children, old bigot. So you needn’t worry that others will get to do to them what you so clearly would like to have done, way back in the 1960s when you still had a pulse. Why should they be allowed to do what was denied to you, eh?

            This God of yours would have a field day with your twisted spirit if he actually existed. Good thing he’s just a figment of yor imagination. But at least the fear of him should keep you gibbering with fright until you finally kick the bucket, so i suppose some kind of justice is being done.

          • Inspector General

            One doubts your sanity, and there is much in the words you plaster around Cranmer to suggest your life will end by your own hand. Surrender yourself to the medical authorities in the immediate and obtain the professional help you so clearly are in need of.

          • Linus

            What, all you can think of as a rejoinder to my remarks is “go kill yourself”?

            You don’t have an original bone in your evil and decaying old body, do you? Certainly not a subtle one.

            Sorry to disappoint, but I’m going nowhere. I’ll outlive you. And I’ll see everything you hold so dear disappear into the garbage chute of history. You’re an endangered species, you old dinosaur. Time to start coming to terms with your impending extinction!

          • Inspector General

            Oh joy upon joy, you’re still alive. Look you fool, you are barking mad. You’ve been bummed too many times, if the Inspector was asked his professional opinion…

          • Linus

            Rant all you like, mad old fool. Then when you explode from spite and impotence, we’ll all get a respite until the next vicious old homophobe goes off on one.

            Gradually you’ll all die off, unmissed and unlamented, and the world will be a happier place. Until then shout and rave all you like. It has no effect, but if it helps you cope with your feelings of frustration and powerlessness, shout away. Losers always weep and wail.

  • David

    I am pleased that, at last, the very sleepy left has finally grasped the threat that the EU Empire represents to all of us, right, left or middle.
    But apart from that I see nothing attractive in the left nowadays. It has a strange bundle of policies, often contradictory and designed to destroy much that is good and wholesome.

  • Manfarang

    Different world now. Leaving the EU won’t save Britain from decline.Many parts of the world are forming economic unions and forging ahead.
    People in the UK are slow to accept change.Corbyn is a conservative with a small ‘c’.

    • David

      Yes I agree, the world continues to change, as it always has done.
      To keep abreast we need to adapt as well.

      One of the the many disadvantages of the EU is that it is too euro-centric, attempting to shelter from change within little Europe. Outside the EU Empire, freed from gazillions of the unnecessary regulations, and its slow moving bureaucracy, we can be more fleet of foot, writing our own far slimmer trade policies, and moving faster to grasp economic opportunities.

      No one claims that being outside the EU, will of itself save us, but it will liberate us from unnecessary burdens. Thus freed we will be able to forge ahead, and be the global trader that we have always been, but do it better than now. To be ourselves we must exit, preferably as friends.

      • Manfarang

        Slow moving bureaucracy? What do you think the government bureaucracies are like in most countries in south and east Asia for example?
        Trade with what? McVitie’s Hobnobs. The Japanese and American companies based in Britain will relocate to eastern Europe in the event of a British EU exit.

        • David

          You miss the point.
          A bureaucracy that aims to please, or at least balance the totally disparate, often conflicting interests, of such a widely spaced group as the present 29 member states, will always move far more slowly than a single country representing just its own interests.
          It is ridiculous that the UK, with the world’s fifth biggest economy, and well steeped in the arts of international trading, for centuries, needs to wait for such an impossible balancing act to be performed before it is graciously granted permission to sell.
          I don’t buy your scare stories of foreign firms fleeing if we leave the EU. Why should they ?

          • The Explorer

            It’s a very good question. If Ford cars are made in Britain, are they British or American? If Dyson cleaners are made in Taiwan are they British or Taiwanese?

            I vaguely remember these sort of arguments when Rover collapsed and the manufacture of Japanese cars took over. Was this a good thing? The argument seemed to be that Japanese cars (and electronic goods) made in Japan might have difficulty penetrating the EEC. But if they were made in Britain, they could be exported to Europe under British membership terms. If Britain were to leave the EU, Japan would lose its back-door EU membership.

            As a non-economist, I have no idea if it’s a valid argument. But it’s the one I’ve heard made.

          • It would still be able to sell cars in Europe.

            International corporations wishing to sell their products in Europe have to build.employ and participate in the European economy.

            This is what Japan is doing in the UK with its car factories. It’s
            mutually beneficial because their cars have improved tremendously and they are helping our economy by investing in factories and employing our people. I would hope that the cars made here are classed as British made and that the Japanese Companies are registered here and
            pay their taxes here.

          • David

            I agree. That argument is put about. But it is, like the EU, out of date, representing a centralist socialist 50s solution to address the problems of a divided Europe of the 30s and awful 40s. Quite simply the world has moved on, and is now far more complex and dynamic.

            In the early post war period European trade was a huge proportion of world trade. All that has changed dramatically. Europe is now the only continent, locked into over regulation and centralism, that is not growing economically. Neither is its indigenous population of course, the answer to which we are told by our EU masters is immigration, which has controversial results.

            The EU has been out flanked by overarching global trade agreements that make illegal trade barriers, except very small ones. I believe that about 1/2 % added to dockside prices are acceptable. So that means China, Brazil, the US or Canada trades successfully with the EU, as we all know they do, paying those entry costs. Goods manufactured in the UK do not attract entry costs. But our government hands over 50£ million daily, a part of which is returned by the EU to projects not of our choosing but theirs. So if our UK resident firms have to pay a landing tax, Government can easily reimburse them paying part of the money saved in direct Government to Government tax. Running our own trade policy we can be far more nimble capturing slices of markets whilst the slow moving EU is still pondering how it can satisfy the requirements of its 29 member states – an impossibility of course.

          • Manfarang

            Access to a larger market, as they have said.
            Dealing with other European countries is much easier than dealing with Saudi Arabia. (mainly arms exports)
            Exports to third countries require a commodity code not permission unless a licence is required.
            Economic Unions are being formed in other parts of the world so increasingly trade is between blocs.
            How much trade does the UK do with South Africa now?
            I don’t think it will increase simple because Britain is no longer in the EU.There is no more basking in Imperial glory.

          • We were the world’s third biggest economy some years back so we are slipping slowly backwards. Getting out of the EU is a must if we want to move upwards once more.

          • David

            Quite !
            It’s octopus like regulations are stifling the growth of the most dynamic sector of the economy, the small manufacturing firms. Friends and relatives, running small, less than 20 person firms tell me frequently, how many more they would employ if the EU derived regulations hurdles were not so high and costly to surmount.
            A centralised, socialist bureaucracy, a new Soviet State, is death to the small/medium sized firms, which are the job creators. Big international Corporations love ’em, because it lazily, stifles their up and coming competition.
            Leave the EU, rejoin the rest of the world !

          • IanCad

            We do a pretty good job of stifling ourselves. That wretched H&SE must be reined in; and Pronto!

        • bluedog

          ‘The Japanese and American companies based in Britain will relocate to eastern Europe…’.

          They won’t. Corbyn will nationalise their assets.

          • Dominic Stockford

            He might try, but the international courts will stop him.

          • bluedog

            The international courts are unable to enforce their judgements against a nuclear weapons power. A Marxist and nationalist revolutionary like Corbyn would see his approval rating soar by playing the xenophobe card.

  • Politically__Incorrect

    If the Labour party can return to it’s political roots perhaps the Conservative party can too? Perhaps the so-called “progressives” on the left and the right are about to become political dinosaurs.

    • Inspector General

      The Conservatives need to dispense with ‘the list’ and go back to the days when individual constituencies selected their candidates. Or is that a bit too democratic for newbies like Cameron.

  • Terry Mushroom

    I rather like Simon Carr’s suggested questions for Liz Kendall that she should ask the Labour Party.

    – How have we so thoroughly lost touch with our purpose, principles and people?
    – Why have we encouraged people not to work?
    – Why have we countenanced living on benefits as a lifestyle choice?
    – How have we allowed racial, cultural and workless ghettoes to spring up and claim millions on Britons?
    -Why don’t we like the working class anymore?
    -Why would Labour MPs prefer their children to be Tories rather than be a plumber or truck driver?

    (Suggested in The Oldie)

    • Anton

      Answers to 2,3 & 4 are easy: electoral bribery.

  • The PrangWizard of England

    Corbyn’s rise is made more likely because fewer and fewer people have much knowledge of, and certainly no experience of the 1970’s. There are many who think, – what’s the harm? – they will come to regret it.

    The government needs to wake up to the almost inevitable prospect that with Corbyn there will some pact with the Hard Left SNP and it’s rabid anti-Englishness. Their disruptive tactics have been underestimated. Cameron will need to raise his game. He has been completely opposed to the vital necessity of a true parliament for England, but the SNP are intent on making the UK parliament unworkable and they will get much help from Corbyn and his supporters.

  • IanCad

    Until this recent publicity I had not heard of Jeremy Corbyn.
    Don’t like his extreme leftism but he seems to me like straight shooter. He’s OK on the EU; And, he has a beard which should attest to his intelligence and good commonsense.

    • Anton

      Such as calling for everything to be renationalised.

      • IanCad

        Oh Dear! He should shave off his beard.

        • bluedog

          Perhaps Corbyn will win the Inspector’s vote by calling for the return of steam on BR.

    • Do you know why he grew the beard?

      • IanCad

        No Jack. I’ll bite.

        • Corbyn has won the Parliamentary “Beard of the Year Award” a record five times – yes, there is such an award. He says he grew it as “a form of dissent” against New Labour and their policies.

          • IanCad

            Jack,
            You are a mine of information. If Corbyn has the best beard in parliament – and I don’t doubt you – then what pathetic little bumfluffs the others must have. I mean, Corbyn’s barely qualifies as a beard – hardly more than a goatee. Maybe I expected more after seeing so many spectacularly endowed ISIS cutthroats flaunting their bushy bristles.

          • bluedog

            HJ is a former Socialist Worker. So is Corbyn. Which begs the question, is HJ in fact Corbyn?

          • IanCad

            That would be something!
            Further to his comment – How can growing a beard be considered a form of dissent?

          • bluedog

            Corbyn is so puritan that the possibility of him being HJ can be safely dismissed. Although it has always surprised that so many Marxists came from the Catholic/Orthodox stream rather than the Protestant stream of Christianity.

            These days growing a beard is the mark of the hipster, so Corbyn was clearly ahead of his time. Corbyn’s beard is somehow very un-Islamic too, which means that he may be successful in securing the youth vote.

  • Redrose82

    Do you all realize that should Jeremy Corbyn and Tom Watson win their respective elections, the Labour party will be led by Tom & Jerry. That’s all folks.

    • Chris Paul

      Bradshaw and Corbyn gives Ben and Jerry, a sweeter confection perhaps.

      • Dominic Stockford

        Are they all not compelled to vote for Bradshaw or be guilty of homophobia?

  • len

    Labour seems unable to learn from past mistakes so back into the wilderness?

  • grutchyngfysch

    There wasn’t any mention of this directly in the above article, but given Cranmer’s long-time pursuit of the Rev Sizer, I imagine it will be something that will be exposed in due time should Corbyn-mania continue unabated.

    Although I can see the funny side of the Labour party tearing itself apart, I can’t be sanguine about a man like Jeremy Corbyn gaining power in one of the two major political parties.

    This is a man who has, at every stage of his career, actively condoned and sought to support terrorists. The IRA, Jihadi apologists of every shade – Corbyn counts among his friends men who literally and unapologetically write poetry about exterminating the Jews. He has worked for Iranian PressTV, standing in for George Galloway, and he has shared platforms and conferences not only with “extreme leftists” (a term which doesn’t seem to provoke much in the way of public opprobrium usually) but, perversity of perversities, “far-right” extremists and neo nazis.

    This is not a man who should be anywhere near power, let alone the Foreign Office.

    It goes without saying that were even a fraction of these public events ones which a Conservative leader candidate had organised, the outcry would likely result in their retirement from public life. The hypocrisy is tediously familiar; the danger of a man like Corbyn reaching high office is yet novel enough to be a possibility along the lines argued above.

    • Inspector General

      That’s why we want Corbyn to win…

  • AB

    The only surprise for me about the rise in support for Brexit (rebranded Lexit for Left Exit by Owen Jones) from the left is that it has taken so long. Corbyn could easily shift that way and it would open up a path to becoming PM. https://botzarelli.wordpress.com/2015/06/15/beware-of-what-you-wish-for/

    I don’t think Burnham could because, like Miliband before him, he seems oblivious to the inconsistency between his policies and EU membership. Had Miliband actually read his own speeches in the context of EU laws he might have done so and this year’s election might have turned out rather differently. https://botzarelli.wordpress.com/2013/09/27/is-miliband-quietly-leading-the-uk-out-of-the-eu/