brexit academics oxford
Education

Forget Brexit academics – how many of them are Conservatives?

Government Whip Chris Heaton-Harris has sent a letter to all university vice chancellors asking for the names of academics lecturing on European affairs, with particular reference to Brexit. He also requested copies of all course material and access to online lectures:

chris heaton-harris letter brexit

This has led to all manner of hysterical allegations, from “sinister” and “idiotic Leninism” to “McCarthyite” and”Stalinist“. It was, to be frank, a bit crass to ask for a list of names of academics, not least because all politics lecturers are invariably listed on a university’s website, along with their subject specialisms and areas of academic interest. Further, these biographies usually boast a list of their distinguished research publications – it’s all already in the public realm: it’s simply a case of asking a researcher to do the trawling.

That said, the latent concern lurking behind Chris Heaton-Harris’s question isn’t without academic relevance. Consider, for example, Oxford University’s current series of lectures ‘Prime Ministers and Europe since Thatcher‘. Margaret Thatcher’s views on Europe will be expounded by Lord (Charles) Powell, her Foreign Affairs Private Secretary (and a Remainer); Gordon Brown’s views will be expounded by Lord (Stewart) Wood, his Special Adviser (and a Remainer); Tony Blair’s views will be expounded by Lord (Andrew) Adonis, his Head of Policy (and a Remainer); John Major’s views will be expounded by Lord (Chris) Patten, former Chairman of the Conservative Party (and a Remainer); David Cameron’s views will be expounded by Sir Ivan Rogers, former UK Permanent Representative to the European Union (and a Remainer); and Theresa May’s views on Europe will be expounded by… well, TBA… (but you can be sure it won’t be Bill Cash).

If you think this is irrelevant, you don’t understand the significance of academic bias or the imperative of conceptual frameworks. Of course, all academics are politically biased (because everyone is): the task of the academic is to be transparent about that bias and to ‘handle’ it. The list of speakers in this Oxford series of lectures were all chosen and invited by someone (or some two), and there you can be sure to find more Remainers.

You can also be sure that Lord Powell won’t be commenting on this letter of Lady Thatcher’s:

thatcher EU letter Brexit

Or if he does, he’ll doubtless put it down to the early on-set of dementia (because, of course, had she been Prime Minister in 1992 and refused to sign the Maastricht Treaty, Brexit would probably have come 25 years earlier).

The paucity of Brexit academics is really a symptom of a much wider and more significant problem within academia – the absence of political balance within faculties where politics really matters (ie the Humanities, Social Sciences, Literature and interdisciplinary cultural studies). Universities will bend over backwards to ensure equality, diversity and inclusion when it comes to age, ethnicity, disability, sex/gender and sexuality. But political belief? University educationalists, theologians and political scientists lean overwhelmingly toward what may be considered a ‘liberal’, ‘progressive’ and ‘statist’ worldview (ie left-wing), deploying all the jargon and theories of leadership necessary to bolster their own positions and appoint their successors. The institutional bias becomes that of a self-perpetuating left-leaning elite, which is essentially pro-EU, anti-State, anti-individualist, socialist, federalist, ‘third way’, globalist and ecumenical. How many university review committees on, say, diversity and inclusion actually include an identifiable political/philosophical/theological/educational conservative?

How many Heads of House at Oxford support the Conservatives, or even manifest a conservative worldview?

Baroness Royall has just been appointed Principal of Somerville College (where Margaret Thatcher studied). She is a prominent supporter of the Labour Party. This follows Alan Rusbridger leaving the Guardian to run Lady Margaret Hall; Mark Damazer leaving BBC Radio 4 to run St Peter’s College; former Newsnight editor and Channel 4 executive Tim Gardam is Principal of St Anne’s College; ex-Guardian and Economist writer Frances Cairncross is Rector of Exeter College; ex-Observer editor Will Hutton is Principal of Hertford College; ex-BBC/IFS Andrew Dilnot is Warden at Nuffield College; Labour’s Baroness Kennedy is Principal of Mansfield, and her former student now LibDem peer Lord (Ken) MacDonald is Warden of Wadham.

How many prominent Conservatives ever become head of an Oxford college (notwithstanding that Lord Patten of Barnes is the current Chancellor, but you can be sure he wouldn’t have been appointed to that position if he had been a Brexiteer [or agitated to reverse the University’s 1985 decision not to award Margaret Thatcher an honorary doctorate]). You have to be a certain sort of Conservative to secure academic advancement, as The Lady illustrated when she divided the sheep from the goats:

thatcher list for and against

So, let the vice chancellors shriek about the McCarthyism, Stalinism and Leninism represented by Chris Heaton-Harris’s innocuous letter; of how this odious Tory Brexiteer represents a clear and present danger to academic freedom and freedom of thought. And then let them explain why Conservatives (and conservatives) are so vastly outnumbered by liberal-left-leaning academics in all our universities, and why they are apparently oblivious to the real McCarthyist, Stalinist or Leninist implications of this for academic freedom.

  • dannybhoy

    I just watched this great clip re the state of teaching in public schools in the US and education in general…..
    https://freedomoutpost.com/liberal-professor-dumbing-america-began-public-education/

    • IanCad

      Thanks Danny – a welcome antidote to the irredeemably gormless Maria Miller, heard on 5Live this AM, along with a gaggle of other permanently offended man-haters.

      • dannybhoy

        She’s great, isn’t she? Old style feminist with a sharp wit and keen sense of humour. I thought it was a great analysis.

  • I applaud Heaton-Harris’s questioning. It serves to expose the bias of the academics. We know the vast majority are remoaners and this proves it.

    • Simon Platt

      I should think he has no realistic chance of getting the information asked for. But he might already have got what he really wanted.

      • Inspector General

        Exactly, sir. What Heaton-Harris has done is what would be called dumb insolence. Rather elegant strategy, one can say.

  • a self-perpetuating left-leaning elite, which is essentially pro-EU, anti-State, anti-individualist, socialist, federalist, ‘third way’, globalist and ecumenical

    It turns out that the elites on both sides of the Atlantic are singing from the same hymn sheet. Chemi Shalev, a journalist on Haaretz, lists the achievements of America’s left-leaning elite: ‘immigration, pluralism, multiculturalism, social reform, government intervention, separation of church and state, gay marriage, abortion rights and on and on.’ Quite a feat, turning a country inside out, and in so short a space of time.

    • Manfarang

      If they are all Marxists, they would be pro-Brexit. The EU being a neo-liberal capitalist club blah, blah. blah…

      • IrishNeanderthal

        Yesterday, we were at war with Eurasia. Today, we are at war with Eastasia.

        • Manfarang

          Yesterday we were at war with the Axis. Today, we are at peace with East Asia. All that remains of a British military presence in East Asia are some troops in Brunei.

          • IrishNeanderthal

            Is it that you are unaware of the reference to Nineteen Eighty-Four, and thereby miss the point of my comment, or are you simply playing clever games?

            I am reminded of an inquiry to James Thurber’sThe Pet Department, showing a room infested with cats:

            Q. We have cats the way most people have mice.

            A. I see you have. I can’t tell from your communication, however, whether you wish advice or are just boasting.

          • Manfarang

            Clearly Eastasia disputed.

          • IrishNeanderthal

            Do you have some desire for revenge against the people you have left?

          • Manfarang

            Rigid conservatism is responsible for the industrial decline of Britain. There is little can do attitude to innovate and develop new products.

          • Anton

            Not in big companies, but they were always going to go where labour was cheaper ultimately, and our small companies remain innovative.

          • Manfarang

            “our small companies remain innovative” and get taken over by foreign enterprises.

          • bluedog

            Ever heard of the Five Power Defence Agreement?

          • Manfarang

            Yep. I once stayed as a visitor at the Dieppe Barracks (NZFORSEA) in Singapore and I remember seeing the Aussies at Penang (Butterworth Rifle Company).

          • bluedog

            The point is, the FPDA remains a British commitment East of Suez. It’s not a treaty, just an ‘agreement’ but with things heating up in the South China Sea, the FPDA could suddenly be a bell that rings very loudly indeed. Is there any doubt that China would prefer to see Singapore as a Chinese vassal state that did not grant access to Western forces?

          • Manfarang

            Mainland China is now economically dominant in SE Asia. They have already exerted control of the South China sea.

          • bluedog

            China doesn’t yet control the South China Sea. What China has successfully done is to unite the SCS littoral states against it, in particular Japan (SCS user) and Vietnam. Conflicts are won by the state or the alliance of states with the largest aggregate GDP and we can include the US in the equation. On this metric, China is doomed to fail, it’s just a matter of time.

        • Chefofsinners

          Tomorrow… Euthanasia.

      • @ Manfarang—The EU being a neo-liberal capitalist club blah, blah

        I assume that one of your blahs refers to the main role of the EU, that of dismantling the nation states of Europe. A former WTO Director-General speechifying in 2009: ‘And yet there is a place on earth where new forms of global governance have been tried following World War II: in Europe. More than half a century ago Jean [Monnet] said: “The sovereign nations of the past can no longer provide a framework for the resolution of our present problems: And the European Community itself is no more than a step towards the organizational forms of tomorrow’s world.” This was as valid then as it is now.’

        • Manfarang

          You assume wrong.

  • bluedog

    The date of the second note is significant, just three days after the Argentine surrender on the Falklands. Despite winning such a resounding victory, the numbers agin are far greater than the supporters. Shameful really, what bunch of pygmies those Tory wets were. At moments like this it is probably kinder not to compare Mrs May with Lady Thatcher. Imagine Thatcher, backed by the Brexit vote and swinging her handbag at Juncker and the rest of the EU crew in negotiating the terms of the deal. Thatcher would have had it all worked out, whereas May flounders, completely unable to see that the correct gambit now is to simply withdraw from negotiations and wait for the Germans to arrive in London on their knees with an offer. It wouldn’t take long. Somebody should explain to May that you don’t talk about hard-Brexit, you do it, and well before the due date.

    • Chefofsinners

      Macron recently said he thinks the British are bluffing about a no deal exit. The EU leaders are making the same mistake they made when Cameron was trying to get a deal pre-referendum. They are underestimating the British public who are, unfortunately, lions led by a donkey at present. However, the beast is stirring and soon the roar shall be heard again.

      • bluedog

        True. The British are far tougher than their current leaders, who seem to succumb to the globalist elite disease on reaching positions of power. The pressure is unrelenting though, look at the utterances of Michael Bloomberg this week. A RINO, of course, and it’s hard not to become a conspiracy theorist at times, such is the apparent coordination of the attack.

  • Jonathan

    Margaret Thatcher… “Brexit would probably have come 25 years earlier” – are there two Margaret Thatchers then?
    It was a Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher who oversaw the Single European Act, the single market and moving from European Economic Community to European Union. And no referendum. She showed no interest in leaving the EEC or EU when she was actually Prime Minister with a huge majority.
    Allegedly after she left office she became a brexiteer, but no actual firm evidence for this has been provided and in fact she studiously deliberately did not publicly expound such a position at all.
    Euro-skepticism does not necessarily a brexiteer make.

    I imagine it is not totally unreasonable that all of the mentioned Prime Ministers who were all remainers when in office to be represented by people who are also all remainers (well maybe not May, though she was a remainer previously too).

    • magnolia

      To your question the simple answer is “yes”. She changed her mind on Europe, as did Sir Keith Joseph, who came close to sackcloth and ashes- – once he realised the nature of the beast. I once saw such a letter.

      Mrs Thatcher claimed in her autobiography that no one could have predicted the loss of sovereignty involved in the first joining of the EEC at the time. Unfortunately this is false as those who voted against joining the EEC did exactly predict that, and there are plenty of records to prove as much.

    • She was duped like many others. She didn’t realise until a while afterwards where the path of the EU would be heading.

    • Royinsouthwest

      Margaret Thatcher probably regarded the single market as a plan for removing non-tarrif barriers to trade between the EU members which is how it was sold to the general public. However it has been used as a trojan horse for harmonising regulations at the supra-national level and increasing the powers of Brussels.

  • magnolia

    Why are there so few Brexit academics? Simple, because their essays get marked right down

    further down the tree. The best way to be a Brexit academic is to have been a Remainer and converted. The official story is that Brexiters are dim, hence there is a bias against promotion.

    The latest Ipsos Mori pronouncement on why people voted Brexit does not even mention the main reason of democratic deficit. i.e. we do not like undemocratic unaccountable mega-rich oligarchy prone to totalitarianism. Hardly unreasonable reasons, especially in the aftermath of WW2 and the Iron Curtain, yet even the reasons we voted that way are spun and reinterpreted. It IS sinister.

    • Simon Platt

      I used to be – and was at the time of the referendum – a Brexit academic. I knew a few others. Oddly enough, they tended to be those towards whom I felt most sympathetic on other grounds. Birds of a feather, I suppose.

      That said, we were engineers, and didn’t write essays.

  • grutchyngfysch

    As soon as I heard that the government was involved in inculcating “idiotic Leninism” in British Universities, I knew academics wouldn’t be having a bit of it. Can’t stand the competition.

    • Manfarang

      I remember a leftwing university professor having a conversation on a train with someone bemoaning the fact that few of his students were leftwing activists.

  • David

    Freedom of debate and inquiry, that essential mechanism for extending the boundaries of knowledge, are a mirage in the social sciences of academia. But what do they produce that is new, or innovative or takes our culture forward ? It just seems like a rehashing of the same old, same old to me. Academia pushes forward in the sciences and applied sciences but not, it seems to me, in the liberal arts or social sciences.
    The bias towards the liberal-left is always there and certainly not ‘balanced’ as they demand in all other areas of life. My cynical belief is that Blair wanted 50% of the young to attend university, knowing that they’d be ‘studying liberal arts courses’, as he saw that as a way of indoctrinating half of the young.

    • Manfarang

      In my youth I remember another student saying a study of Marx reveals the flaws of Marxism.
      Today’s youth face heavy debt and a very uncertain future.

  • Anton

    The correct reply to Heaton-Harris is: “Thank you for your letter. Why do you want to know?”

    But if Your Grace is wondering why so many academics are Lefties (and let’s add to your list Rowan Williams at a Cambridge college, and that National Trust woman’s imminent installation at Balliol), consider that higher education is now a nationalised industry.

    • betteroffoutofit

      It may be nationalised here – but it’s not in the U.S: where the Frankfurt School holds sway. Several US academics have “unfriended” me on FB – simply because I express support for Brexit. They won’t even communicate with me once they know my preference .

      At first I was upset because I admired the scholarship of one or two. Now, though, I’m rather sick with disgust at their equivocation in relation to “academic freedom.” They weren’t even the ones to whom I refused support for ‘marxist/feminist/franco-german claptrap.’

      And for those two who’ve stayed by me: I just can’t stand to read their own leftie rantings re American guff; not that I would dream of expressing any opinions on that, of course. I consider America to be theirs, not mine.

      • Anton

        Everybody goes on about the Frankfurt School. The Paris school did a lot of damage too with people like Derrida, Lacan, Althusser, Barthes, Foucault…

        • betteroffoutofit

          Well yes – that’s who the Frankfurters promote. Franco-german claptrap lies there.

        • Manfarang

          And what damage was that? People might split their sides laughing.

          • Anton

            Damage? They displace sense with nonsense in our university Arts faculties and in the heads of a generation of students.

          • Manfarang

            I am familiar with universities that do not train students to question what they are taught needless to say they are not high on world rankings.

  • Anton

    One might also ask how many Tories are conservative…

    • Royinsouthwest

      Possibly an even better question but one that is less relevant to universities where conservatives are a rare species. Today’s Telegraph contains an article saying that because of a campaign in Cambridge to “decolonise” English literature the English Department has decided to drop some white authors and include more non-white ones. The campaign was led by the student union’s women’s officer Lola Olufemi who has said her top priority as “women’s officer is “the admission of trans women to women’s colleges.”

      She also claims that the current curriculum risks perpetuating institutional racism. Wouldn’t it be more accurate to say that people like her risk perpetuating the sort of institutional racism that we have seen in towns like Rotherham where the authorities have been over backwards to avoid doing anything about crimes by a group considered more equal than others?

      Cambridge University caves in to student’s campaign to replace white authors with black writers
      http://www.telegraph.co.uk/education/2017/10/24/cambridge-university-caves-student-demands-decolonise-english/

      • Coniston

        I think the following article is also relevant as to why students are increasingly attracted by the left-wing, quite apart from any input from their lecturers:
        The cult of Corbyn is Marxist Gnosticism
        http://standpointmag.co.uk/node/6990/full

        • bluedog

          Corbyn = Chauncey Gardiner. Idiot savant du jour.

          • Anton

            Let’s hope that Corbyn is content to watch.

      • IrishNeanderthal

        Sounds like something out of Peter Simple.

      • Anton

        The English department has long been a shame to the university. It came close to closure in the early 1980s over the Colin MacCabe affair, it was heavily in favour of awarding an honorary degree to the influential charlatan philosopher Jacques Derrida a decade later in another internal row that went public. Now this. Mortimer Adler’s comment comes to mind.

  • Anton

    Now *that’s* a “Dear Bill” letter!

  • Chefofsinners

    When someone asks a simple question and the response is a barrage of criticism of the question and the questioner, you can be sure that it was a good and searching question.

    Academics have always been predominantly left wingers. This is because they and their principles are incapable of functioning in the real world.

  • not a machine

    Oh I see, our future high achievers are getting an Eu feed that may or may not reflect a true version of if the Eu was/is any good. Brings a whole new meaning to the word detergent in terms of brainwashing. So academics can recall persons who were there with the exception of one Margaret Thatcher and a play can be made with remainers directors cut to an audience that applaud to be visited by such distinguished previous players of certain moments even though shh they were wrong about what sort of mess the Eu would turn into and would like a weakend

  • David

    Academics have always been predominately left wing because they are never responsible for dealing with the effects of their theories, as their jobs are secure anyway.
    Secondly most social sciences and liberal arts academics are, unlike in science and engineering, not expected to use evidence to support their theory.
    These two factors effectively insulates them from the real world.
    Interestingly academics in the physical or earth sciences and applied subjects like engineering who do have to use evidence and are responsible for testing how their theories work in the real world, tend to be apolitical or less heavily inclined towards the ‘shoal of fishes’ left wing mentality.

    • dannybhoy

      I have always believed that the plans and schemes of academics and social scientists should first be tested and refined on them and their families. For example before releasing patients who had committed violence whilst being mentally disturbed should first spend six months with the family of the psychiatrist who believes they are now fit to rejoin society….

      • Anton

        It wouldn’t have worked with the Higgs boson.

        • dannybhoy

          Clap him in irons then, and promote one of the deck hands..

        • David

          Physicists are rarely raving lefties. They have more respect for evidence.

          • Anton

            Academic physicists at least mainly vote Labour, perhaps because universities are a nationalised industry today. But they are most certainly not infected with the postmodernist nonsense that there is no such thing as truth, because science makes the opposite obvious.

      • David

        Excellent idea !
        This should be applied to those unrealistic supporters of open borders including those in the churches. Indeed I would like to see all those social conscience warriors, many of them champagne socialists, be made to take in refugees into their own households, to have to support them and be made responsible for their conduct, for six months, before they are released on the general public. Instead they just enjoy parading their “virtues” in public without taking any responsibilities for the effects of such refugees.

  • IanCad

    I must admit that my first reaction to the story of Chris Heaton-Harris’s request was to think he was out of line.
    Now I am a person of strong views, based on a pretty good general knowledge of history, politics, the ways of the world; possessed of a superiority evidenced by a rejection of TV, movies and the common pursuits of lesser folk. Confident of my principles formed through careful reflection, common sense and an enlightened upbringing – all these merits make it a rarity indeed when my opinion is rendered void by a thoughtful editorial.
    Know all men by these presents; I was wrong! HG has the heart of the matter.

    • dannybhoy

      Your modesty becomes you Cadders

      • IanCad

        Believe me Danny, I have much to be modest about.

  • Darter Noster

    I’m very happy to see the written evidence that St. Margaret, of hallowed memory, would not have signed up for Maastricht :o)

    If Chris Heaton-Harris, with whom I shared a corridor in the European Parliament some years ago, is researching academic views on Brexit for a book, as is being claimed, he should have written in a private capacity.

    All this weeping and gnashing of teeth about academic censorship is utterly ridiculous, completely exaggerated, and bears no relationship to reality, like Chris Patten’s career.

    However, much as the utter domination of the discourse about Brexit and other aspects of the academy by Leftie academics irritates me – and it does, intensely – these academics must be left alone to make idiots of themselves of their own accord. Any attempt by Government to change academic discourse will only backfire and give them dditional credibility.

  • Sybaseguru

    Maybe they will all migrate to the EU when we quit. After all that’s where their funding comes from. Will we miss them – No. It will be interesting to see how they justify their position when forced to compete for UK funding.

    • dannybhoy

      Yes, they migrate and we replace them with Gru’s Minions. At least we’ll get a laugh
      BAA-NANAS!

      • dannybhoy

        Hi Clive, how’s things?

        • CliveM

          Ok DB, busy and tired. How are things with you?

          • dannybhoy

            All things considered, and recognising who’s ultimately in charge I am very well thank you. How’s your little family?

    • Manfarang

      Retirement visas available in SE Asia.

  • Dreadnaught

    Marxist historian Eric Hobsbawm observed,
    ‘reviewing the EU at the end of the 20th century, it is ‘misleading to speak of the “democratic deficit” of the European Union. The EU was explicitly constructed on a non-democratic (ie non-electoral) basis, and few would seriously argue that it would have got where it is otherwise.’
    If Hobsbawm isn’t your cup of poison try Bruno Waterfield who puts it,
    ‘The EU has evolved, not as a federal superstate that crushes nations underfoot, but as an expanding set of structures and practices that have allowed Europe’s political elites to conduct increasing areas of policy without reference to the public’.

    http://www.spiked-online.com/newsite/article/yes-mr-tusk-the-eu-must-be-defeated-brexit/20485#.WfHmtWhSyyI

    • David

      A splendid article !

    • HedgehogFive

      The secret history of the EU, written on an Italian prison island, reveals why the project is doomed

      The venue chosen for an August 2016 meeting of the leaders of Germany, France and Italy, to discuss what they can do next . . . was the little island of Ventotene off Naples was where, in 1941, Altiero Spinelli, a prisoner of Mussolini, had written the visionary manifesto that looked forward to building, after the war, a “United States of Europe

      Spinelli’s Ventotene Manifesto proposed that his future government of Europe should be quietly assembled by its supporters over many years; and that only when all its pieces were in place would those supporters summon a convention to draw up a “Constitution for Europe”, which would finally reveal to the European people just what they had been up to.

      What many people miss about the European Charter is that it calls for an ever closer union of PEOPLES.

  • dannybhoy

    Ah, busy and tired + fresh off the line teenager..
    All makes sense now.
    Our god daughter is a little sweetie, growing in confidence. We are hoping she will get a place in a very good school next year, and she spends the day with us tomorrow.
    We were thinking of taking her to see “Goodbye Christopher Robin” and Pizza Hut afterwards.
    The simple pleasures of childhood…

    • CliveM

      I thought I had read that Goodbye Christopher Robin was quite a grown up film?

      • dannybhoy

        PG. We took her to see BFG when it came out, but yes GCR might be a bit too grown up. Maybe Despicable Me 3 instead..

    • dannybhoy

      Mm, actually having read the reviews I think it’s not suitable for her..

      • CliveM

        Despicable Me 3 then!

        • dannybhoy

          Baa-naan-as!

          • CliveM

            Couldn’t put it better myself!

  • IanCad

    Where’s Len??

    • CliveM

      He appears to have deleted his account and left. No obvious reason why.

      • dannybhoy

        Shame.
        I like Len.

        • CliveM

          Yes sad.

          • betteroffoutofit

            Yes. I’m sorry too. Thanks for checking on it for us.

          • Chefofsinners

            Alas, poor Len.
            I always remember Ken Dodd saying “What a gay day for going up to the Kremlin, knocking on the door and saying ‘Is Len in?'”

          • IanCad

            I hope we see Len back soon, but to add to your wordplay on his moniker, here’s another one from Robert Conquest:

            There was a good Marxist called Lenin
            Who did two or three million men in.
            Now, that’s a lot to do in
            but for each one he did in
            That great Marxist Stalin did ten in.

      • IanCad

        Thanks Clive.
        I do hope all is well with him. He’s been on this blog forever.

      • David

        That’s a surprise !
        He was a stalwart.

        • CliveM

          It happened a couple of weeks back. HJ noticed it at the time.

      • Sarky

        Lost his faith?

        • dannybhoy

          Unkind Sarks, but not altogether unexpected..

        • Anton

          Lost his password more like.

      • Anton

        He did report a problem that I and Chef explained was in his computer rather than the blog site software and we advised him to clear his cache. Perhaps he made a mistake in what he did next but I’m sorry that he’s not back.

  • Mike Stallard

    When I was up at Cambridge in the early 1960s, the Master of my College (Pembroke) was chosen for his scholarship by the College. As far as I know, my tutor was summoned to London for advice on South America, otherwise, the College was an independent entity – and, best of all – there was not even an NUS!
    Happy days…

  • seansaighdeoir

    test