Macron Revolution
Foreign Affairs

Félicitations, President Macron – Vive la Faux Révolution!

As the victorious President-elect Emmanuel Macron appeared in front of Le Louvre to address the Fifth Republic, it was conspicuously to the strains of Beethoven’s ‘Ode to Joy’ – the EU ‘national’ anthem – rather than to ‘La Marseillaise’, France’s revolutionary anthem to liberté, égalité, fraternité. For Macron, l’esprit de la nation dwells much more in l’Europe than in la Patrie, and that means le jour de gloire isn’t going to arrivé any time soon.

Sorry to put a dampener on things, but becoming France’s youngest leader since Napoleon is a nice media refrain, but fresh faces and optimistic drivel don’t create national unity or forge reconciliation. He can spout all he likes about serving France with humility, strength and love; and he can pledge ad nauseam to unite his fractured country with his neither-left-nor-right enlightenment therapy. But this is just Blairite ‘Third Way’ Eurovision: 34% of voters supported Marine Le Pen’s Front National (including 44% of young people), and that’s a rather respectable result for the far-right Holocaust-deniers and anti-Semitic revisionists.

Hillary Clinton might believe Macron has saved France, Europe and the world (yes, really), but this is a shallow political salvation. France has a shooting-star president who is defined in the popular consciousness more by what he is not than what he is: the anti-Le Pen. He doesn’t only have to persuade her 11 million supporters that he has heard their “anger, anxiety and doubts”, he has to convince the 12 million sons and daughters of France who abstained along with the 4.2 million who spoiled their ballot papers that he is more than a garlic-infused French kiss.

And that’s going to be difficult. Macron is an establishment énarque; a former multi-billion-euro investment banker, political advisor, and finance minister in President Hollande’s government. He rails against the self-serving elite, but he is one. He derides decadence, but swims in it. He despises populism, but rides it. He feels for political disenchantment, but helped cause it. He vows to shake up the system, but he is the embodiment of it. He blasts the democratic deficit, but seeks to perpetuate it. He broadcasts transformation, revival and revolution, but it’s just more Europe, more ever closer union, more of the same.

France has elected the lesser evil in En Marche!, but Marine Le Pen’s Front National isn’t going to go away. A transcendent movement for change which promises change must deliver change, or today’s 44% of disenchanted youth become tomorrow’s revolutionary 80%. And they won’t easily forgive the soothing rhetoric of tenderness and trust when their friends are having their eyes gouged out in the next Bataclan battlefield. That’s when the ‘Ode to Joy’ will be drowned out as l’étendard sanglant est levé, and ces féroces soldats will descend to égorger vos fils, vos compagnes.

Macron’s ouverte principles of fraternité and dreams of universal égalité don’t really have an answer to France’s increasingly islamised quartiers. Le Pen’s solution is utterly wrong: you can’t re-educate, incorporate or inculturate if you stigmatise, repress and alienate. You don’t stop suicide bombers by banning halal food in schools. But Macron is dangerously naive: it is not nationalist to want to preserve French culture, or racist to be concerned about mass immigration. Jihadism cannot be neutered with grandiose visions of social solidarity and intellectual left-right ideological realignment. When this latest bright new thing fades, as he surely will, France’s revolution will continue:

Aux armes, citoyens,
Formez vos bataillons,
Marchons, marchons!
Qu’un sang impur
Abreuve nos sillons!

But félicitations, President Macron, on winning the Élysée Palace and becoming the latest photogenic messiah to preach the power of love, peace and reconciliation. If you get a minute, you might reflect on a line of the Archbishop of Canterbury’s morning meditation at the Sea of Galilee today: “But we know that true reconciliation only takes place when there’s an acknowledgement of what’s happened.”

You can’t unite France if you’re in denial: a faux revolution of ‘more Europe’ is just storing up Le Pen for another day.

  • Anton

    Suddenly, nothing happened.

  • I liked Le Pen’s comment before the election. “Whoever wins this election, France will be run by a woman”. I’m assuming she was referring to herself or Merkel, but I suppose it could have been that she meant Macron’s wife.

    • Anton

      Macron’s wife was his high school drama teacher. She taught him how to act.

      • Learning his lines and delivering them correctly; an essential for all politicians!

      • Dreadnaught

        She taught him a lot more besides I reckon.

      • bluedog

        One reads that her interest is in educational reform…

  • Christina Summers

    I’ve had the delightful experience of meditating on the Sea of Galilee, but never ‘mediating’ there 🙂

    • Anton

      How about ambulating on it?

      • Christina Summers

        Not done that in the natural (yet) but doing it every day in my spiritual walk 🙂

    • Corrected, bless you.

  • len

    Those behind the EU ( the bankers, the political elite, those with religious interests) can breathe a sigh of relief, because their man got in.
    The status quo has been preserved under the illusion ‘of change’.

    • carl jacobs

      those with religious interests

      Eh? Who would those be?

      • len

        Jacks friends.

      • The Lizards … the Jewish-Masonic-Jesuit cabal.

        He was educated by Jesuits and then by Brigitte Auzière, a married teacher with three children.

        • Anton

          One of whom is older than he is!

        • len

          You’ve got to get some help with the lizard obsession Jack.
          People are talking.

          • You agree to receive treatment for your anti-Catholic obsession and Jack will consider it – subject to his superiors agreeing. They’re out there Len.

  • ecclesiaman

    An excellent piece of insight and observation. I could wish for HG to be PM, now there’s a thought!
    The result is sad if not tragic for France but what about the UK? Are we not headed in the same direction? Personally I am at a loss what to do with my vote in the GE. I identify with the abstainers and spoilers for the first time in my life. If only UKIP could come to the rescue (but that would be thwarted by our elite) but unfortunately cannot happen with their self destructive behaviour. Oh for some tranquil meditation of the non-mindfulness variety. I wonder what sort ABW practices?

    • David

      “Personally I am at a loss what to do with my vote in the GE”
      I’m in that “abstainers and spoilers” club too… for the first time in my 66 years !

      • ecclesiaman

        In my case 75 years minus 18 or was it 21, I can’t remember! Having been a reluctant member of the C party for a few years I left after DC’s redefinition of marriage, changing things he did not understand for some possible political advantage.

  • IanCad

    “But Macron is dangerously naïve–“
    So it would appear; As it also seems so with his blood brother Justin Trudeau, Prime minister of Canada. Photogenic, personable, well-connected and educated but seemingly lacking any corresponding common-sense.
    At least Macron has the benefit of an older, and hopefully, wiser wife, but I fear France will have to hurt a lot more before it gets better.

    • john in cheshire

      Could either of them pass the bacon sandwich and lawnmower tests?

      • David

        The lawnmower test ?
        Please “lighten my darkness …”

        • Pubcrawler
          • TropicalAnglican

            Thanks! I was wondering whether to ask John whether people were still using scythes to cut grass — looks like Ed Miliband could be one of them!

          • Pubcrawler

            I’ve used a scythe in the past. Very satisfying. But I wasn’t very good at it and kept slicing through the washing-line.

          • Anton

            Better than slicing through the electric cable. You aren’t at risk of electrocution from the washing line.

          • TropicalAnglican

            Out of curiosity, could I know how you managed to slash through the washing-line? Surely it is at about shoulder height? Unless the grass had grown that high…??

      • IanCad

        Forgive me John but I’m at a loss. Are they two separate tests or part of the same one? Either way I’m in the dark. Must get out more!

  • CliveM

    A President without a party, or at least one without members in the National Assembly, the elections for which take place on the 11th and 18th June. It’s one thing to run a Presidential campaign, it will be very different to run a parliamentary campaign with requires extensive resources, representatives, organisation and back up, the length and breadth of France. Without a clear win in these elections, Macron is dead in the water, with no realistic chance of getting his legislation though.

    Far from being a dynamic Presidency, there is a risk that it will be the most moribund. Indeed what faces France is political deadlock and little change, not ‘revolution’. He may aspire to being a Blair (lucky old France!!), but will probably lack the levers to do it. He’s smacked both the main political groupings in the mouth, they hate him for it and are unlikely to support his agenda (whatever he decides that will be).

  • Sybaseguru

    Is he a banker or a politician? As a banker he could well fall out with the EU politicians as he would be in favour of EU no-nos like debt writeoffs to restore economies, whist as a politican he would have to play the German austerity card. Interesting times ahead.

    • Sybaseguru

      Update. Macron has tried to be both today and Mrs Merkel has told him to get lost.

      • bluedog

        If Macron is as intelligent and rational as we are led to believe, at some point he will conclude that the French economy cannot be reformed and rejuvenated within the Eurozone. If his thinking progresses this far, the solution becomes obvious.

  • or today’s 44% of disenchanted youth become tomorrow’s revolutionary 80%

    The figure of 80 per cent may already be impossible to achieve. France tests newborns for sickle-cell disease but only tests those at risk of contracting the disease, who are overwhelmingly non-white. In 2014, 37·2 per cent of newborns in France were tested, up from 31·5 per cent in 2010; Ile-de-France was top with 69 per cent. Assuming that non-whites are unlikely ever to vote in large numbers for the Front National, the indigenous French are in a race against demography.

    If the indigenous French voted as a bloc, Le Pen would have walked it but ‘80% of those aged 65 and over’ voted Macron. That’s an awful lot of self-hatred. As you would expect, Jews and Muslims were told to vote Macron but, shamefully, Protestants were also advised to vote for him—and for more Islamization.

  • chefofsinners

    How far is far?
    Let Pen is apparently far right and extremist. Yet she gained 34% of the vote, a figure that Labour and the Greens combined would die for. When can we expect the BBC to start referring to them as ‘Extremist’?

    • bluedog

      Ironically the real extremists are those who abstained or spoilt their ballot papers.

      • chefofsinners

        Only 44% of the electorate voted for Macron. – In a two horse race where, as Hillary will tell you, the future of civilisation was at stake.
        What with that, and no MPs, it could be a tricky few years.

        • bluedog

          Absolument. Currently 56% of French GDP is the activity of the state and its agencies. Micron seeks to reduce this to 50% and will also have to raise the working hours from 35 to at least 40 per week, plus cut the six weeks vacances to four. Enter the unions and the Muslims. Apparently 40,000 cars a year are burnt in the banlieus, and one can forecast that the French motor industry seems on the brink of a boom, literally.

          • chefofsinners

            The miracle continues…
            Macron has promised that while extending the working week by 15%, cutting holidays and slashing state spending, he will also reduce unemployment from 10% to 7%. He must be Emmanuel indeed. The feeding of the 5000 was just so lacking in ambition.

  • carl jacobs

    The problem is that the EU can’t fix itself. It is unwilling to move forward to fiscal union. It is unable to move backwards from monetary union. It is trapped in its current position – unable to change and fearful of the growing disaffection among the general population. The democratic deficit is the only thing keeping the EU from collapse.

    • David

      Yes. Nicely put !
      The patient is kept alive on life-support systems.
      Macron may be a fresh-faced new leader but he is politically, in democratic terms, a zombie President lacking in any hinterland, before he even starts. The whole thing has the air of hollowness and tragedy hanging over its head.

  • Dreadnaught

    Quite right Cranmer. It’s the same old Hollandeist, Elitist-Lefty soap, supplanted with the Ad-man’s favourite flash-tag NEW IMPROVED FORMULA
    plus ça change, plus c’est la même chose

  • David

    What an unattractive mess all this truly is !
    But there are two things that strike me the most forcibly.
    Firstly the growing disconnect from reality and the story told by the mainstream media. The BBC and most of the media describes Le Pen as “far right”, yet her policies are a form of a socialism that puts the French nation and culture first. The term “far right” is just a meaningless labels saying “herein are nasty people”. Truly the MS media, and those foolish enough to believe them, now peddle the post -truth age. A plague on all their houses !
    Secondly I have the growing feeling that France, and maybe other countries too, are being slowly propelled by the forces of both demography, and the evident disconnect between a broad swathe of the electorate and the attainable choices on offer, towards a most unquiet future possessing the distinct risk of fractures of increasing severity, and eventually, maybe a second civil war.
    As with the first French revolution, one hopes that a post-Brexit UK can avoid whatever horrors may be the future path of the western, continental nations.

    • Thomas Moon

      I don’t think I ever heard the BBC mention the Front National without putting the words “Extreme Right-Wing” in front. And Macron was always described as “Moderate”, “Centrist” and “Cuddly” (or am I imagining that last one?) Agreed – “Far Right” is now a completely meaningless term. “Extremist” means holding views that would have been considered completely normal by most people until a few years ago.

      • bluedog

        Add ‘populist’ to the terms of disdain used to describe the right, but never the Left.

      • David

        Quite !
        In the hands of the BBC and other, oh so superior types, words no longer convey meaning and truth, but are merely a sort of marking system of approval/disapproval, where the marking scale is set by the self-styled ‘cultural elite’.
        Unfortunately many competent but politically naive types are conned by this technique. Macron’s hollow ‘victory’ is a typical result of these machinations.

      • Paul Greenwood

        was Stalin “far left” or “centrist” after he eliminated Trotsky ?

  • chefofsinners

    A triumph of style over substance. How very French.

    • bluedog

      Micron, peut-etre.

    • Anna

      Actually it is the first time, the French have made such a ridiculous choice – under normal circumstances Fillon might have been the president. Sad. He will gladly sell his country to the bankers and the Islamists.

      • Anton

        Normal circumstances in France being someone who pays his family under the counter, then.

        • Anna

          Can you name one country where politicians are principled, and incorruptible?

          • Anton

            Doesn’t mean some aren’t worse than others!

          • Anna

            Well, Fillon wasn’t elected. He was the frontrunner until ‘Penelopegate’.

          • Anton

            I meant countries, not individuals – apologies for the ambiguity!

          • Paul Greenwood

            somewhere there must be politicians who aren’t lawyers

          • Anna

            North Korea.

      • chefofsinners

        Have the French ever chosen style over substance before…?
        Let me count the ways:
        1. Tiny portions of food.
        2. Berets which only cover half your head – if you can ever stop them falling off.
        3. Sticks of bread that go stale in 5 minutes and lacerate your mouth.
        4. The Eiffel Tower.
        5. The Maginot line.
        And…
        Their fish is poisson, their bread is a pain and their pancakes give me the crepes.

        • Allosexuel

          Ma chérie, ma baguette ne sera pas coupé la bouche.

        • IanCad

          Very clever Chef!

        • len

          Thats just the good points.

        • Isn’t French fish being poissonous a tautology?

  • bluedog

    Yes indeed, Your Grace. Those who abstained or voted informally number some 36% of the total French electorate of 45 million, more than the numbers who voted for Le Pen. One senses that the anti-fascist riots that would have greeted a Le Pen victory have been deferred and will take on a different form. There is no doubt that Macron is more impressive that Le Pen, but he seems destined to be swept away by forces that he clearly does not understand and will be unable to control.

  • Watchman

    An American teacher of history once told me that the most important thing her students needed to know about the French was every twenty years they surrender whether or not they need to. It seem she was being unduly optimistic.

    • I’m from Barcelona
      • Watchman

        Thank you, how very apt!

      • David

        Lemmings ! Very appropriate !

    • Paul Greenwood

      They did not surrender at Verdun and lost more men that the US ever has. Foreign wars have been cheap for the USA and hugely profitable

      • Watchman

        Please don’t let pedantry spoil wit.

        • Mike Stallard

          Or wit pedantry…

      • carl jacobs

        They did not surrender at Verdun …

        My father fought harder for France than the French did. And he was only in the country for five weeks.

        … and lost more men that the US ever has.

        It’s generally considered a good thing to win wars without getting so many people killed. You don’t win wars by getting your own soldiers killed and it’s not necessarily a good measure of effective fighting. It might just be brain-dead strategies & tactics.

        Foreign wars have been cheap for the USA and hugely profitable

        You would have preferred we stayed out of it? No, that wouldn’t be the case, would it. You’re welcome then.

        • Paul Greenwood

          Yes. In fact WW1 was to protect JP Morgan and prolonged the war. WW2 was instigated by FDR and Bullitt in Paris and Chamberlain was forced into a stupid guarantee for Poland which was surreal

          • carl jacobs

            How do I say this nicely?

            Do you actually inhabit the planet Earth?

    • IanCad

      The teacher’s an idiot.

      • Mike Stallard

        No.
        This was explained to me at Cambridge all those years ago when I was reading History with Mr Joslin. French children are brought up in the country by the grandparents while the parents go out to work. The grandparents tell tales about their generation’s courage and revolutionary fervour. That is why the French have a revolution of sorts every 20 years as each generation reaches manhood.

        • IanCad

          Hogwash!!

  • Anna

    Blair, Obama, Cameron, Osborne, Trudeau and now Macron. In politics, and only in politics, the top job is now reserved for the youngest and the most inexperienced. The only qualifications necessary are – an interesting background, a first degree (UK) or law degree (US), decent public speaking skills, (most important) charm and good looks. After all, the job involves initially winning over desperate – and gullible – voters, and then fulfilling the pre-ordained role of serving bankers and other special interests. Modest salary, but excellent retirement perks.

    • chefofsinners

      George Osborne? Good looks? Get thee to an optician.

      • Anna

        That’s why he had to settle for second place, when his relative youth would have qualified him for the top spot.

    • Sarky

      You forgot.. they have to be a bit cheesy and France got it in bucketloads with Macron’i’cheese.

    • Maalaistollo

      ‘As for my people, children are their oppressors, and women rule over them. O my people, they which lead thee cause thee to err, and destroy the way of thy paths.’ Isaiah 3 v12

      • Watchman

        Isaiah 3:4
        “I will make youths their leaders, and the unstable will govern them.”

        • Little Black Censored

          Or, more memorably:
          ” And I will give children to be their princes, and babes shall rule over them.”

          • Watchman

            i particularly like the Douay=Rheims Version
            “And I will give children to be their princes, and the effeminate shall rule over them.”
            This is difficult to support, however, using Strongs

      • rapscallion

        Interestingly, talking of children, has no one noticed that Merkel, May, Macron, Gentiloni and Rutte are all childless.

    • Paul Greenwood

      The puppet master chooses his puppets to appeal to the TV watchers

    • Mike Stallard

      I do not think Mrs May quite fits this category. What was it that M. Berlusconi said about Mrs Merkel? And as for Ms Sturgeon…

      • Anna

        Mrs May wasn’t elected. Coming to Mrs Merkel – I have to say that the Germans have not yet succumbed to the modern trend of choosing leaders for their youthful good looks.

        • Little Black Censored

          Mrs May was elected: first as an MP, then, by the MPs, as leader of her party.

          • Anna

            My point is that people like Cameron and Ed Miliband were more likely to be considered for the top job ahead of more experienced candidates like Mrs May. Following Brexit the grown-ups are, at last, in charge.

    • Paul Greenwood

      In France and Germany Civil Servants can enter Parliament WITHOUT resigning their Civil Service jobs and gaining automatic promotions in their absence.

  • chefofsinners

    Francois Hollande will now hand over power to Emmanuel Macron in the traditional French manner. He will surrender.

  • Politically__Incorrect

    So France has a woman president – Mrs Merkel. Given Mr Macrons liking for older women I suspect he will be putty in her hands. I am tired of hearing the media tell us that he is bad news for the Brexit negotiations. The entire EU is bad news for the Brexit negotiations. The negotiations will fall flat on their face as soon as Junckers is told where to insert his divorce bill. Macron is simply another of the EU’s goons who wants to have a go at Britain. Nothing to see here. Move along.

    • Paul Greenwood

      I fail to see why IM Erika is held in such awe. what is it the dumpy Merkel does to make her like Circe turning men into swine ?

  • Paul Greenwood

    Funniest part is that his “reforms” of labour market as Economy Minister found no parliamentary majority so in May 2016 they had to be imposed by presidential decree

    http://www.reuters.com/article/us-france-protests-labour-idUSKCN0Y11Q6

    He has no party and no majority in the Assembly

  • Inspector General

    Desperate times calls for desperate measures. Why not vote for Le Pen? If the French are going to reverse the impending end of white European hegemony in France, they are going to have to do something radical. So what if some of her supporters are anti-Semitic holocaust deniers. Don’t stand next to them then. Stand somewhere else. Remember this, it’s not those types who might at any time decide to end yours and others existence by murderous motor vehicle, assault rifle or sharp blade, it’s the common enemy.

    It’s easy to vote far right, if you remember you are forced to do it because of the ineptitude of previous political types you trusted. And you won’t be alone for doing it for that reason either.

    As it stands, all that has happened is that they have put off the necessary day for another few years. In the meantime, what’s French for sticking plaster that soon falls off. The French have a word for everything, they say.

    • David

      Too many French are still asleep, soothed by the fictions of the media.

      • Paul Greenwood

        25% did not vote, 9% spoiled papers, 74% turned out…….but only 66% valid votes were cast of which Macron booked 65% which means he was backed by 43% electorate.

        That included 500,000 Overseas Territories where people could vote twice due to some strange events

  • Anna

    It is shocking how the media has been applauding Macron’s unconventional marriage. Apparently it’s all about ‘love’. A strange definition of love, when you consider the shameful way Mme. Macron seduced (or allowed herself to be seduced by) a 15 year old? No sense of duty or loyalty to her ex-husband and her poor children. How low France has sunk!

    • David

      Indeed.
      The word is, if we believe it, that she ‘targeted’ him. It was a scandal in their town, even by French standards. So his father sent him away to Paris, hoping it would go away, whilst warning her off him until he was an adult. I read somewhere he also has a ‘boyfriend’. Not a good role model for the young of France.

      • Inspector General

        Just checked on PN David. If he was a homosexual, they would have said. Seems to be a rumour put about by a Russian publication.

        • Paul Greenwood

          You really think so ? You do not know much about M. Le Pen and her backers then. All is not what it seems

          • Inspector General

            It’s unknown how that party would behave in office. However, we know from Egypt how a democratically elected Islamic government behaved in office. If it’s the possible loss of democracy in a muslim infested Europe that is bothering you, it would be better to worry about its continuation therein same…

          • Paul Greenwood

            Muslim-infested ? You must be posting from Tel-Aviv

    • Paul Greenwood

      She would have been suspended by the GTC in England

      • Anton

        And what would he have been suspended by?

        • len

          I dread to think?

  • Your Grace – so how would you propose to neuter Islamism?

    Macron seems to favour the capitulation approach, under the delusion that if you give people who are attacking you what they want then they’ll stop. Rather than double down on what is clearly a successful strategy and extract more.

    You say that stigmatising people doesn’t help. But surely social stigma is an essential means of maintaining social order without the constant resort to law and coercion. Stigmatisation of the immoral and anti-social is underrated.

    • Inspector General

      No point targeting Cranmer, that man. He’s just like the usual. Crying wolf but not prepared to consider the full answer. Same everywhere. For example, if you want to stop home owners being shot dead by burglars in the South of England, restore hanging. It won’t happen then.

      • IanCad

        A far better solution Inspector, is to insure your home with Smith & Wesson.

        • Anton

          As mentioned at 2:05 here:

    • Mike Stallard

      Have you read “Submission” yet by Michel Houellebecq? It explains in great detail what France will be like under Islam after the next French election when the left and the Muslims combine to stop le Pen.

      • Anton

        Yes, interesting novel.

        • Little Black Censored

          It is interesting but I think not alarming enough.

          • Anton

            No, it just stops before the Sharia hits the fan.

  • chefofsinners

    Emmanuel Macron will be inaugurated next Thursday.
    It will be a trajeudi.

    • David

      Why do the English, including myself, find messing about with bad French amusing – Franglais and all that ?

      • Something to do with centuries of messing around with the French, presumably 🙂

        • Allosexuel

          Ooo la la … I ‘av ‘erd aboot yoo hommes Anglais.

          • Je suis désolée, je ne parle pas Franglais!

  • The German’s have won – again. This time without firing a single shot.

    • carl jacobs

      Did you really expect a different outcome? The French system is designed to prevent candidates like LePen from winning. This is a campaign for the long haul, Jack. It’s the cumulative failure of the EU that will bring it down. But it will happen slowly.

      The first really threatening election for the EU is in Italy. Neither France nor the Netherlands offered a true prospect for EU defeat at this moment in time. But Italy is a different story. You can bet the Italian gov’t will delay that election as long as possible.

      • To be honest, Jack didn’t want LePenn to win.

        • David

          That’s surprising – from you.
          I do not like Le Pen’s socialism at all, but I recognise her genuine love for her people, country, faith and culture. So I was rooting for her. I want France to survive as France.
          But now the skies look dark indeed, after all the over-65s voted, lemming-like, for that puppet of the bankers and globalists.

      • Anton

        Then there are the Italian banks…

    • len

      The Germans are good at winning battles.Not so good at wars.

  • chefofsinners

    Troubling news. Rearranging ‘E Macron’ gives us… Cameron.

    • Allosexuel

      ‘e is a sweet little macaroon.

      • Lienus

        Yes, a sweaty little moron.

        • Allosexuel

          Yoo ‘arboor seceet desiires an arr jaloux de Brigitte. Je wood noot kik ‘im hors du lit.

    • IanCad

      I know nothing about you Chef, but you must have a lot of time on your hands. Keep plugging away, with your mind one day you will be a rich man; if you’re not already.

      • chefofsinners

        Thank you for your encouragement, Ian. I’m a busy man, but this site hosts the highest quality insights available anywhere. My contributions are little more than graffiti.

        • carl jacobs

          this site hosts the highest quality insights available anywhere

          And Jack as well.

  • carl jacobs

    Macron says that “Nationalism is war” and he would like to substitute a sterile concept of “patriotism” in its place. But of course what he really wants is to create a European National Identity where “patriotism” means little more than regional preference. He wants to make the difference between Bulgaria and Romania into the difference between Ohio and Pennsylvania. It’s a Utopian vision.

    The Eurocrats are questing after a goal that can never be achieved. The Germans (for example) are never going to view Athens in the same way they view Munich. On the other hand, the Eurocrats believe that failing to achieve this goal will mean reversion to catastrophic war. They are thus trapped in an impossible quest that can only produce failed expectations. They are ideologically committed to rejecting the possibility of failure. As a result, they will not be able to act to address the problems that grow more severe with each passing month. The EU is the cause of the problem but the people who are running the EU will never accept that this is true.

    It’s a recipe for catastrophic failure, and who know what will emerge in its place.

    • Paul Greenwood

      Catastrophic war is what France and Germany each unleashed on Europe and Russia. It was Napoleon that destroyed German monasteries and expropriated church lands, impressed soldiers and marched them to Russia to fight. It was France that seized the left bank of the Rhine over 200 years and it was Prussia that launched a war of liberation after its catastrophic defeat at Jena in 1806; and it was at the Battle of Leipzig 1813 that Russian and Prussian Armies destroyed Napoleon’s forces with 600,000 men on the battlefield. Prussia and Russia then liberated Confederation of the Rhine from French Occupation.

      Macron merely thinks he can be a rejuvenated Hollande and sit at the top table with Merkel to achieve his goal of French control of the German Finance Ministry and shutting out Britain. He will propose complete defence mergers with French control of military and a new EuroZone Finance Ministry in Brussels staffed with technocrats and bankers.

      There is ZERO chance of him implementing policies Juncker mentioned such as cutting French Government from 57% GDP without imposing it from outside as with Greece

    • David

      I agree with your analysis.

    • “Macron says that “Nationalism is war” … “
      A Frenchman would say that; not that they know anything about war.

  • Paul Greenwood

    The biggest tragedy of the EU is just how little people in one EU country know about another. It is strange how few Europeans understand the 3 Kingdoms in the UK or the difference between UK and GB. How many Germans actually believe the Queen rules the country or that the UK is subsidised by the EU sand is not a Net Contributor.

    Then again, few people in UK know how France functions or Germany – they eulogise Germany as a paragon of efficiency and quality and neither is true, but it allows shoddy products and practices to get British approval.

    The EU has failed because very few people actually know any history, culture, or experience of other countries in the EU other than a plane trip to a bar or beach

    • David

      My observations of life tell me that, most people are only interested in enough knowledge of history and politics to allow them to function. Beyond that there is little intellectual interest. This may be difficult to accept by people such as you or me, who are interested, but that’s what I observe.

    • Dolphinfish

      I don’t think many English people know the difference between England and the UK, either.

  • Dolphinfish
    • David

      Oh what a tasteless, childish mind Guy Verhofstadt has.

      • len

        Some people should never be put in position of power. Guy Verhofstadt seems to be one of them.

  • Jack does look favourably on some of the Labour Party’s policies.

    • len

      Corbynista.
      I knew it!.

      • No. Jack will hold his nose and vote Conservative.

        • Hi Happy Jack,

          Not that I’d discourage you….. But. On the politics show yesterday there was a thing called the “Christian people’s alliance” . Sounded like your cup of tea:

          Scrapping nuclear weapons
          Paying couples to get married (£10,000)
          Anti abortion
          Anti gay marriage
          Turnover tax

    • Surely they would have to decide on some policies first 🙂

  • Manfarang

    Moon Jae-in to win!

    • bluedog

      Odds? Owner, trainer, jockey?

      • Manfarang

        The Blue House.

  • Linus

    Let me translate the fake archbishop’s words from his usual tuppeny ha’penny faux Shakespearean declamatory style into plain English.

    “Damn! The Titanic just avoided the iceberg! Now we rats who jumped ship are left bobbing up and down in mid-Atlantic while the liner steams off and leaves us behind.

    “We thought if we grabbed a lifeboat and got as far away as possible, we’d have a better chance of survival. No panicking passengers thrashing about in the water pulling us down with them. But there they are, all comfortable and safe on board their luxury vessel, while we’re freezing our ratty little asses off in this windswept and unstable little tub.

    “We took plenty of supplies with us, but they’ll run out soon enough. And the ship isn’t coming back for us. If we hang on long enough, maybe a rescue vessel will put out from the US with emergency rations. But they won’t tow us to land. We’re on our own now.

    “Keep on bailing! Your lives depend on it!”

    • Manfarang

      As Trump said,”Brexit is gonna be great.” The Americans will move in to pick up the trade big bits when Britain pulls out..

      • bluedog

        Living in a military dictatorship seems to be having a bad effect on your judgement.

        • Inspector General

          Military Dictatorships are a blessing for peoples who need such, man’s best friend.

          • Manfarang

            SLORC wasn’t much of a blessing I am afraid.

        • Manfarang

          There is the Road Map back to democracy.

          • bluedog

            Why not? A five year plan that takes twenty years to implement is just the ticket. The current ruling cadre have plenty of time to loot the nation and stuff their share into accounts with the Swiss banks in Singapore. Anyway, when the generals take over the government there’s usually a colonel with big ideas just waiting for his own opportunity.

          • Manfarang

            Mai pen rai. Trump has a standing invitation to visit.

    • Inspector General

      You people do puppet governments rather well. Mrs Merkel won the presidency, and don’t you forget that!

      • Manfarang

        President Trump to win on June 8 eh?

        • Inspector General

          Have you been taking fools cap lessons from Len, by any chance…

          • Manfarang

            Nope I know what the global reach and power of America is from my own experience. I must say the Americans are a pleasure to work with.

          • Inspector General

            Trumps a good Scots lad. In him the UK can trust.

          • Manfarang

            The only thing that is Scotch is in his glass.

          • Inspector General

            Nordics run the world, son. Be assured and stop worrying.

          • Manfarang

            Not so many Nordics in Shanghai.

          • Inspector General

            Pity the Chinese. They’re good mates with North Korea, but there are far too many communists in the place for Pekings liking…

          • Manfarang

            Beijing. The Communist Party Of China currently has 88.76 million members. Second largest political party in the world. North Korea Population- 25,387,580.

          • carl jacobs

            It isn’t 1895 anymore, Inspector.

          • len

            Shouldn`t you be over at PN Inspector….Doing whatever you types do there?.

          • Inspector General

            Strewth! It’s like summonsing the Devil…

          • len

            You have experience of that I suppose?.

    • Anton

      Further icebergs ahead… Hungary’s refusal to take refugees, Italian banking debt, further elections…

      • carl jacobs

        … Inability to reconcile monetary policy with fiscal policy … De-population …

    • len

      We in the UK been ‘on our own ‘before and look how that turned out.

      Perhaps a more pressing matter for the French is how high can the French Poodle Jump when the German Rottweiler barks?

      • Manfarang

        The Guns of Navarone eh?
        The real events, the Dodecanese campaign, was a different story. No American air cover.

      • Linus

        You haven’t been “on your own” since the mid 16th century. That’s when you started invading and subjugating your colonies. Before then you were a peripheral player in European affairs whose only leverage was to play Valois off against Habsburg.

        When France and The Empire agreed, England’s situation deteriorated badly. Blockading your wool exports caused you severe economic discomfort. No ruler of the Low Countries could afford to sideline you for too long however. Their industry was too dependent on your raw materials.

        Of course once you had your own colonial markets for your produce, you became less easy to bring to heel. And once Scotland fell under the English yoke, the French policy of encirclement and containment was no longer possible. Britain rose to greatness on the back of ever-expanding colonial markets and the subjugation of the Scots. My, how times have changed.

        You have no more colonial markets. Your former colonies made other arrangements when you joined the EEC and are not likely to dump their new trading partners just because you snap your fingers and say you’d like privileged access to their markets now. So who will you trade with? The US? Good luck with that. The president you place so much faith in has already said that his country needs to sort out its trade relationship with the EU before it does anything else. You’re way back in the queue. It could be years before any kind of treaty is concluded between you. And there’s no guarantee it will be in any way favourable to your interests. Trump is a protectionist. Look at how he’s treating Canada. He’ll be no kinder or more generous to you.

        So where are these markets you’re going to fall back on? India? Get ready for mass immigration then. That’s the price of a trade deal with India. Oops … why was it you wanted out of the EU again?

        So, with no external trading partners, you’ll just fall back on your customary position of playing one European power off against another, will you? How will that work in a united EU?

        Macron’s election means the Franco-German relationship is now reinforced and reinvigorated. And where we go, our neighbours will follow. Britain will leave the EU with no trade agreement in place. Overnight British products will be subject to import taxes and customs procedures, making them significantly more expensive and more difficult to procure. Your firms are already reporting an alarming fall in long-term orders. EU markets are seeking alternative suppliers. Current figures are good, but what does the future hold? You don’t need a crystal ball to see that Britain’s isolation will be total.

        Your only way out is for the EU to fail and for you to revert to your customary habit of playing one European nation off against another. But it isn’t going to happen. You don’t realise (and never have) just how united Europe really is. We have our lunatic fringe of isolationists like every country. But Macron’s victory shows they are in the minority.

        Leaving the EU just at the moment when it moves towards greater integration puts you on the outside looking in. Enjoy your isolation. Trade with whoever will deign to give you the crumbs from their table, which you’ll pay top rate for. The days of plenty are coming to a close. You’ll be on starvation rations soon enough.

        May knows this. Why do you think she’s seeking reelection now? When the reality of a hard Brexit hits and ravages your economy, she’ll be unelectable. Even with Corbyn as an opponent.

        • len

          Keep Jumping Linus .That German ‘Rotty’ senses fear you know…

        • Anton

          Here’s a cut-and-paste from an article by one Nick Hubble which makes a lot more sense than you do…

          So far we’re negotiating with the official EU negotiator Michel Barnier, the three EU presidents Donald Tusk, Jean-Claude Juncker and Antonio Tajani, chancellor Angela Merkel, Juncker’s chief of staff Martin Selmayr, and now the French president Macron too.

          So many people will never be able to present a coherent strategy or deal. The Brexit negotiations probably aren’t going to be an issue compared to the negotiations and disagreements inside the EU camp itself.

          The rifts are already appearing. According to German newspaper Der Speigel, Merkel is rather angry with Juncker’s attempts to sabotage Brexit negotiations. She reportedly said it’s inappropriate to “heat up” the issue by leaking meetings to the press.

          This explains why Theresa May is on the offensive lately. She accused the Europeans of attempting to interfere in the British election. That’s something the Europeans accused the Russians of doing in France recently, making the issue a sensitive one.

          The aim of May’s game is to split the EU negotiating team. By exposing the ardent anti-Brexit camp as overzealous, she creates the opportunity for Merkel and Macron to appear the reasonable ones by becoming conciliatory towards Britain…

          There’s little question that politicians and policymakers at the EU level are more or less against Brexit. It goes against their budgets, jobs, prestige and power. They want to punish Britain and make sure Brexit is not a success.

          But what about the national level? Are German politicians against Brexit? Are French?

          Assuming May is genuine about her threat that Brexit is going to happen no matter what, you’d think a deal is in the interest of national-level politicians in Europe. They’re far more accountable to their voters than MEPs and EU officials are. And national voters want jobs and British goods and services. That means national politicians in Europe want trade and other ties to Britain, especially on security.

          By exposing the EU as the saboteur of negotiations and restraint on trade with Britain, May is charging into a rift here too. She’s exposing the conflict of interest EU politicians have with national level politics.

          There’s one more rift in the EU’s lines. Britain’s old coalition partners in the EU are going to be left to the mercy of Germany and France. Not to mention the balance of power shift towards the rather eccentric eastern European states. The Dutch and Flemish feel like they’ve been left high and dry, which is rare for them.

          Those countries are going to have to do some serious soul-searching in coming years. The more Britain forces the EU to expose its protectionist, collectivist and technocratic nature, the more discord within the EU will grow. In a sense, the EU is its own worst enemy and all its opponents must do is expose this.

          • Linus

            Britain’s leaving the EU. It can’t force us to do anything. The Brexit deal (or rather the lack of one) will be negotiated by a team appointed by the member states, who are all in agreement that Britain must lose the benefits of EU membership as the price of leaving.

            Angela Merkel knows this as well as anyone. She also knows that Britain has no significant manufacturing base and that post-Brexit, they’ll still need to buy cars and washing machines, so the British market for German goods won’t disappear overnight. Neither will the market for champagne and other luxury goods evaporate from one day to the next.

            But what do you sell to us that we can’t get elsewhere?

            Brexit will hurt you much, much more than it hurts us. May knows this and is trying desperately to cast herself as Saint Joan of Park Lane, battling against the evil EU in an attempt to store up goodwill in advance of the great crash.

          • Anton

            You deliberately present only one side of the argument here and I don’t take it seriously.

        • bluedog

          ‘Macron’s election means the Franco-German relationship is now reinforced and reinvigorated. ‘

          Indeed. Macron is nearer to finding out that in any relationship with Germany there is a senior partner, Germany. The days when Germany was racked with post-Nazi guilt are long gone, and Germany no longer needs France as a shield from its own past. Juncker points the way, he doesn’t leak stories in French newspapers but in German papers, where the power lies. Without Britain as a counter-weight to Germany within the EU, France is reduced to a subordinate status. That is your new reality, and you clearly can’t see it yet, but the French electorate will once the Germans crack the whip.

    • bluedog

      An alternative analogy is that it’s only a matter of time before the EU and the Eurozone go down like the Hindenburg.

      • Fingers crossed then.

      • Allosexuel

        Linus noos all aboot goin’ doon.

    • Allosexuel

      Mon petit héros revient. Wheer ‘av yoou bin hidin?

    • chefofsinners

      As we watch the ocean going Linus steaming off up the channel, we acknowledge that he could be the biggest floater we have ever seen.

  • len

    We now have a manic running North Korea, and’ Le Kid running’ France.
    What could possibly go wrong?.

    • The EU really runs France, Le Kid is merely just for show.

      • Anton

        Emmanuel Macron has changed his address to:

        Palais de l’Élysée
        55 rue du Faubourg Saint-Honoré
        75008 Paris
        Großdeutchland

        • Linus

          That’s right, taunt us with accusations of being Berlin’s poodle. That’ll make us quit the EU immediately and conclude a free trade agreement with you, thus rescuing you from the hole you’ve dug for yourselves.

          We know who our real friends and allies are. Germany is one of them. Spain is another. Friends support each other in their quarrels with mutual enemies. When Spain asks for our support against unfriendly British occupation of its sovereign territory, we’ll give it unconditionally. So will Germany.

          We don’t listen to the childish taunts of our desperate enemies. We have allies on whom we can count.

          • bluedog

            Oh really. Where do you get these ideas? The Spanish are like the Italians. They both hate the French, but they hate the Germans more. Anyway, England was once allied with Castille as a counter to France, and again in the Napoleonic era. Has the logic that drove those associations completely vanished?

          • Linus

            Germany, Spain and France are allies and friends. There is no enmity between us. Only the parochial and insular English nurse ancient feuds and rivalries that have no meaning in the modern world.

            Go ahead and try to forge an alliance with Castile. You’ll have a hard time finding anyone in Burgos to negotiate with. They’ll direct you to Madrid, where the competent Spanish authorities will send you off to Brussels. But not before phoning the Commission and saying “if they want a deal, we get Gibraltar.”

          • Anton

            You couldn’t be more wrong. The reason Spain insists that the EU not try to drive a wedge between Scotland and England by offering terms to an independent Scotland terms is that it would fuel the already strong Basque and Catalan nationalist movements.

          • Dodgy Geezer

            Why do the Spanish navy have glass-bottomed boats?

          • carl jacobs

            To keep an eye on the French Navy?

          • bluedog

            Geography doesn’t change.

          • Linus

            Indeed it doesn’t. Gibraltar is part of Spain. A few money-grubbing Brits squatting there doesn’t change that fact.

            Given your propensity to judge the value of everything in monetary terms, what will your price be to sell them out to the Spanish? Considering how desperate you’ll be for a trade deal, probably not all that much.

          • Anton

            How about a swap with Spain for Ceuta? Then we can offer Europe a place to return illegal immigrants back to in Africa. Europe will like the idea soon enough.

          • Linus

            Why should we encourage Spain to give up anything for the UK’s benefit?

            Spain is our partner. Spanish interests are therefore our interests.

            Britain is no longer our partner. British interests are therefore no concern of ours anymore.

            The best situation for Spain, and therefore for the EU, would be to regain Gibraltar and keep Ceuta. If that means Britain loses out, why should that worry us? What is Britain to us now other than a rival and a competitor? The weaker you are, the better off we’ll be.

            That’s the real alternative to EU membership. Competition, not some kind of wet and woolly Christian “all men (or nations) are our brothers” nonsense. We look after our own family. We don’t look after strangers and snooty, snobbish, unpleasant neighbours.

          • Anton

            Spain will do what Berlin says. Just like France will, once we are free of Brussels.

          • Linus

            Paranoid nonsense. This Germanophobia only has one result, you know. Your isolation.

          • Anton

            Actually you should be glad of German domination, given how France runs itself.

          • len

            ‘Germany, Spain and France are allies and friends.’

            Spain and France need Germany even more than ever now the UK has left the EU because Spain and France need German cash.
            Suprising how many’ friends’ you can get when you have cash…

          • Linus

            It all comes down to money with you Brits, doesn’t it?

            That’s why you hate the Germans so much, isn’t it? Because they’re richer than you.

            Jealousy thy name is Christian.

          • Anton

            We don’t hate the Germans. We just don’t want to be ruled by them, like you soon will be.

          • Linus

            The Germans rule Germany. They do not rule France, or Spain, or any other European country. They participate in the government of the EU where, as the biggest member state, their influence is considerable. But they do not rule Europe and can be, and often are, outvoted.

            This myth cherished by the British of a German dictatorship in the EU is merely sour grapes in action. You’re the wannabe dictators. You want Europe to bend to your will and implement your ideas. If we don’t agree with you, it must be because we’re in thrall to that great British bogeyman Germany.

            Your attitude is so contemptibly childish that it’s a relief to see the back of you. Spitting venom at the Germans and accusing us of being their slaves is the sort of reaction you’d expect from a spoiled and thwarted child in a playground. And that is exactly how you should be treated.

            Sit in your corner and sulk for as long as you like. Nobody wants to play with you any more. It’s almost as if you’re afflicted with a national form of Asperger’s syndrome…

          • Anton

            Spitting venom against the Germans? Nay, against Brussels!The proper place for Germans to rule is Germany, and most Germans want no more than that nowadays.

          • Linus

            See how he ducks and dives when confronted with his xenophobia.

            No, it’s not the Germans who are evil – and this despite the fact that he’s been ranting on at length about how they’ve enslaved France and Spain! No, it’s really the nasty and vicious Bruxellois who are to blame!

            Challenge him when he insults one group and he merely changes target and insults another.

            Perhaps I should thank thank your imaginary god (or random chance as he’s known to the sensible and superstition-free) that the kind of ultra-nationalistic, jingoistic and xenophobic claptrap you peddle will soon be classified as “not of EU origin” and have hefty import duties imposed on it. Like all British products, the market for it in Europe is fast disappearing.

          • Anton

            Perhaps you should reread what I actually wrote?

          • Linus

            I did read it. When challenged over your anti-German “beware of the Fourth Reich” rhetoric, all of a sudden you backpedal and start blaming Brussels for all the imaginary and paranoid woes that stoke your anti-European fever.

            You’re nothing more than a xenophobic Little Englander hating anyone who threatens what you see as your country’s right to dictate to others. If France and Germany agree on policy and cooperate to implement it, in your narrow little mind, surviving as it does on a starvation diet of nationalistic slogans and xenophobic memes, that automatically makes France the lapdog of Germany. It’s this inability to see beyond outmoded stereotypes and the anti-foreigner slogans of your nationalistic gutter press that makes you such a figure of fun. If you can’t see that Europe’s future lies in unity rather than division, you clearly haven’t learned the lessons of the past.

          • Anton

            Perhaps you would do me the favour of quoting what you consider to be my anti-German xenophobia in my own words rather than your distorted ones? I have said no more than that Germany will inevitably dominate given the size of its economy and the normal desire of the Germans not to be ripped off.

            “If you can’t see that Europe’s future lies in unity rather than division, you clearly haven’t learned the lessons of the past.”

            Europe can be unified politically only by an absolute dictator, as you may find out.

          • len

            The truth hurts I see.

          • Linus

            It does. It must be very painful to realise you’re so venal and envious. I pity you enormously, although at the end of the day, you’re responsible for your own behaviour. Trying to cover your tracks by claiming to be a Christian when your behaviour is diametrically opposed to Christian principles makes you even more contemptible.

            Of course this is true of pretty much every Christian, which is why the faith is so completely hollow. Nothing more than a fig leaf used to cover up the character traits you don’t want others to see. Take the example of François Fillon, a devout Catholic whose sententious public statements about the evils of corruption were (allegedly) nothing more than a smokescreen to cover his own (alleged) nefarious activities. A case of “do as I say, not as I do”, made even more hypocritical by attempts to flee responsibility when caught in the act using phrases like “but we’re all sinners” and “being a Christian doesn’t make me perfect”.

            It sure doesn’t. But according to the bible, it should. The fruits of the Spirit are supposed to be visible in true believers. So if there’s any truth in Christianity at all, so-called Christians who lie and cheat and are venal and jealous are not Christians at all. They’re exactly those who cry “Lord! Lord!” and then act out of self-interest. If he exists, he does not know you any more than he knows me. In which case, welcome to hell, Pharisee.

          • Paul Greenwood

            England funded Frederick the Great. 1813 Battle of Leipzig a Russian-led Army allied with Prussia destroyed Napoleon’s forces. At Waterloo it was Prussia that saved Wellington, Bluecher strapped to his horse after being trampled.

          • Anton

            Saved Wellington? That’s a distortion; Wellington chose to stand where he did because he knew that the Prussians were coming. He could have avoided offering battle.

          • Paul Greenwood

            he”knew” the Prussians were coming……and Bluecher came…..

          • Anton

            Given that your aim here is simply to irritate, there is no reason to take your stated views at face value.

          • Inspector General

            EU proclamations will continue to be read out in French and posted in French on French walls as normal. But for the diktat in full, you’ll need to read German.

            “Resistance is useless” will always appear at the end of posters.

            By Order. The EU.

          • Zoran

            That’s the problem with the French – they hate those who liberate them but accommodate those who conquer them. The UK almost begged to be allowed in to the Common Market but the disrespect shown to her gave Nigel Farage the opportunity to put into words how so many in GB were made to feel as it metamorphosed into an undemocratic bureautocracy apparently ruled by pygmies like Tusk, Rumpuy and the genius from Luxembourg.

          • Linus

            We don’t hate the Americans. We often disagree with them, but gratitude does not imply eternal deference.

            Britain’s problem is its delusion of imperial grandeur. You think you saved Europe when all you did – all you ever do – was save your own skins and act as a staging post for American troops.

          • Zoran

            If the British Empire had merely wanted to save its own skin it would have copied the French and made a deal with Hitler, who wanted to be our ally and friend. in fact the British victory was Pyrrhic as it totally exhausted her and hastened the end of the empire. We had Churchill, you had the unfortunate Petain and the wretched De Gaulle – I rest my case

    • Paul Greenwood

      Not sure you do have a maniac in N Korea. You only have the wonderfully impartial Western media for your info. So far they have informed us Libya is better now than under Ghadaffi, Iraq is lovely, Syria will be fine once Islamic Fundamentalism is sen as “moderate”. Israel is perfect, Russia is evil and should be nuked, and the Uk has full employment and needs more immigration.

      If you resist the temptation to wallow in this lunacy you can see N Korea gets rattled every time the US stages big military exercises on its borders as at present. It leaves N Korea with a big problem…..whether to open up with 20,000 artillery pieces and drop 1,000,000 tonnes of HE on Seoul and wipre it out inside 90 minutes or wait for a US attack.

      It is not known in UK but the GDR expected WAR on Tuesdays. The German Army went onb leave at weekends and on Mondays maintained its tanks…Tuesday was when invasion from the West was expected.

      Westerners are bizarre. Russia has tanks inside Russia and that is a big threat to British tanks on Russia’s frontiers. F-35 planes fly along the Kalingrad Border followed by Spy planes from UK to see if Russian radar sees the F-35. That is Britain’s right but Russia is somehow wrong.

      So maybe Kim Jing-un wants a Peace Treaty ?

      • Anton

        The Koreans are a single ethnic people, divided into two countries in living memory. Ask them whether they would prefer to live in the north or the south.

        • Paul Greenwood

          I am sure I know the answer but that is not the question……..many East Germans are unhappy with the choice that was made for them……..and since 1990 US military assets have moved eastwards onto the Russian border…….China does not want US assets on its Korean border, nor does Russia

      • len

        There seems to be something wrong with kim’s missiles. I wonder what that could be?.
        Kim cannot broker a peace treaty because it is the constant threat of being attacked by ‘foreign powers’ that keeps his people in line(along with murder , intimidation and fear)

  • Happy VE Day all.

  • carl jacobs

    Today is of course the 77th anniversary of the start of France’s heroic resistance in WWII. Seems ironic somehow.