Donald Trump 3a
Democracy

Donald Trump: the triumph of political incorrectness over incorrect politicalness

 

Unless the GOP does something silly – like steal the nomination in a contested convention by engineering a last-minute coup – it looks as though Donald Trump will be declared the Republican presidential nominee.

Much has been written about this eventuality, and even more will now be written about the “nightmare” (©Bishop of Guildford, 2016) possibility that Trump will soon be ‘Rockin’ In The Free World’ and sworn in as the 45th President of the United States. Most of this journalistic comment will focus on the ‘gaffes’. How can a man who wants to ban all Muslims from entering the US; build a great wall to keep out the Mexicans; says African-Americans have no spirit; opposes same-sex marriage; favours prosecuting women who procure illegal abortions; leches over his own daughter; repudiates climate change; mocks the disabled; jokes about shooting people in the streets; and who offends women with crude references to the breasts, backsides and menstrual periods possibly become President of the most powerful nation on earth?

It is really quite simple: “I think the big problem this country has is being politically correct. I’ve been challenged by so many people, and I don’t frankly have time for total political correctness. And to be honest with you, this country doesn’t have time either,” he declared in a Fox News interview last year. Trump’s ascendancy is a direct consequence of global political conformity to a certain mode; the insistence on a certain narrative orthodoxy; the intolerance of expressions of moral righteousness and the repudiation of emotional authenticity. The people are sick of plastic politicians with their hollow promises, ‘third-way’ charades and rancid deceptions wrapped in the dodgy billions of corporatist elites curated in the bureaucratic shadows of anti-democratic oligarchs. They want light, liberty, transparency, accountability and justice. They want to be heard. They want to effect change – real change – instead of being forced to vote for cloned autobots of approved-list candidates who spout their scripted promises to change the rotation of the earth, but deliver only images of revolution with impressions of gratitude. Donald Trump’s triumphant political incorrectness is a direct consequence of decades of obfuscatory and tediously incorrect politicalness. The people are just sick of it.

For all the ostensible virtues of pluralism and ecumenism; for all the accumulated wealth, wisdom and belief in the enlightenment of modernity, people are still disenfranchised, excluded, alienated and cynical. There is emptiness, banality, starvation and poverty. Politicians promise transformation and transcendent idealism; they engage in endless ethical politicking and perpetual moral vacuity, all while keeping the people powerless to take control of their own destinies. Tradition is scorned, culture corrected, and new values inculcated. If you refuse to conform, you are labelled an ‘extremist’ in the interminable politicalness of progressive rationality.

Donald Trump may be crass, crude, boorish and offensive. He may demean mature political discourse with his self-absorbed narcissism, and insult all thoughtful, intelligent and enlightened people with his childish tantrums and shallow spirituality. But he speaks with a different voice and exudes a strange confidence. And millions of Americans like what they hear and are mesmerised by a courage which refuses to bow to the embarrassment of being. In the postmodern pomp of coercive uniformity and politically-correct worldliness, Donald Trump is an artist, a philosopher, a prophetic dissenter of imagination and differentiation. He is the progeny of revenge; the disjunctive incarnation of his own consensual meaning. You may be appalled and horrified by his values, norms and amoral fantasies. You may be shocked by his gyroscopic character and detached sense of reality. But he is the fabric of our democratic future. Only when patronising politicians and other elites cease their self-perpetuating circulations of consensual privilege and power in the pursuit of total control will they acknowledge that Donal Trump has reason, justification and substance.

  • Anton

    How can a man who wants to ban all Muslims from entering the US; build a great wall to keep out the Mexicans; says African-Americans have no spirit; opposes same-sex marriage; favours prosecuting women who procure illegal abortions; leches over his own daughter; repudiates climate change; mocks the disabled; jokes about shooting people in the streets; and who offends women with crude references to the breasts, backsides and menstrual periods possibly become President of the most powerful nation on earth?

    How many marks out of 10 for that? Non-racist conservatives might say about half marks. Which is better than half-Marx (Obama).

    • IrishNeanderthal

      better than half-Marx

      Apropos of which, what a massive faux pas by Boris Johnson.

      Mr Obama’s mother Ann Dunham left his father, taking the baby with her, in order to further her career shortly after young Barack was born. Whatever politics he may have picked up, it would have been from her rather than his Kenyan father.

  • Uncle Brian

    They say they want diversity, and with Trump they’ve got it. There can’t be many politicians who are more diverse than Trump.

  • grutchyngfysch

    A man who will say anything to secure your vote is likely to change any of his opinions to remain in office. Watch him go native before he’s even arrived.

    • bluedog

      Like Cameron?

      • grutchyngfysch

        Absolutely. But this voter never doubted that either.

  • I have longed to see an end to political correctness.
    Now that I’ve seen a manifestation of it, it doesn’t seem quite so appealing. Quite apart from his crass boorishness, the prospect of seeing Trump’s finger on the nuclear button is worrying indeed.
    But what is the alternative? If Ms Clinton wins, we shall have abortion on demand and it will quickly become impossible to voice any opposition either to that or to same-sex ‘marriage.’
    I am thankful not to have a vote in the US elections. Both options seem appalling.

    • Shadrach Fire

      Or vote Integrity.

      • grutchyngfysch

        The blank ballot option?

    • James Bolivar DiGriz

      Except POTUS does not ‘have his finger on the button’. Under the two man rule, the launch order from the President is not enough, it has to be confirmed by someone who has been approved in post by Congress. Typically that would be the Secretary of Defence but various other senior office holders are also able to fulfill that role.

  • Shadrach Fire

    This US Presidential election is going Virol as far as how bad the front line contenders are. One wonders how the voting public have moved from their Bible Belt broad christian background.

  • David

    As a very successful businessman Trump has made a fortune by spotting and exploiting holes in the market. That is exactly what he seems to be doing now, but with politics.
    As in many of the western countries that style themselves as democracies, a significant portion of the US public has long been growing tired of the claustrophobic dominance of PC, anti-western, anti-patriotic and anti-Christian orthodoxy that has become unstoppable. So they are open to, searching even, for a new approach. As virtually the only, politically incorrect supporter of traditional values in the public eye, Trump is therefore attracting much support. After all, no one else comes anywhere near him, so he is harvesting the whole market share in anti-PC ! If he succeeds we can expect others to follow him. If he fails then the destructive march of PC relativism will continue.
    To me Trump seems not to be unstable, but merely a clever, calculating marketeer. Trump is truly alarming. But if it takes a Donald Trump to stop the relentless march of the PC relativist monster that is steadily undermining western civilisation, then maybe, he represents a gamble worth taking. We certainly need someone insensitive enough, strong enough, independent enough and ugly enough to defeat the monster that relativist PC truly is.

  • Theodore Dalrymple on political correctness (h/t Ivan M): ‘When people are forced to remain silent when they are being told the most obvious lies, or even worse when they are forced to repeat the lies themselves, they lose once and for all their sense of probity. To assent to obvious lies is to co-operate with evil, and in some small way to become evil oneself. One’s standing to resist anything is thus eroded, and even destroyed. A society of emasculated liars is easy to control.’

    Without political correctness, backed up by the fear of breaching it, the wrecking of white Christian nations by means of Third World immigration would not have been possible. Even though the wrecking may have gone past the point of no return, those with a vested interest in seeing the back of whites—that is, every racial and religious minority you care to mention—still cannot contain their fury at the thought of whites defending their own patch of land.

    • carl jacobs

      Oh, shut up already, will you. Black people and Mexicans are not “wrecking White Christian” America. The problem is Secularism, self-worship, and the angst engendered by fear of economic decline. Trump isn’t the solution. Trump is the harbinger of catastrophe yet to come. The problem will be realized when a competent politician follows his lead.

      • Uncle Brian

        The Catholic hierarchy in the United States is very concerned at the large numbers of immigrants from Mexico and other Latin American countries who, on their arrival in the promised land, promptly switch their allegiance to the Pentecostals or other Protestant churches.

      • @ carl jacobs—Exhibit A: ‘The research also revealed that nearly all US school districts with substantial minority populations have large achievement gaps between their white and black and white and Hispanic students.’

        Exhibit B: ‘a key takeaway from the Census 2010 data is that we are becoming a majority people of color nation at an even faster clip than demographers previously thought.’

        Hence, the wrecking of white America and the concomitant ‘fear of economic decline.’ I appreciate that the cold hard truth is unwelcome to you and that you would much rather I ‘shut up’. Ever thought of book-burning as a hobby?

        • The Explorer

          If you treat Mexicans as non-European in origin because they are part indigenous, then white Americans are predicted to be 48% of the US population by 2040. Whether that wrecks America or not, it will certainly change it.

      • big

        I always said after Obama there would be a problem……you can’t tapper a political Ponzi scheme.

    • big

      ….oh we don’t need the third world immigrants to reck ourselves we would have done it anyway….or rather the left would have done it.

  • IanCad

    This is shaping up to be the greatest fun. There is going to be an egg shortage.

    • Anton

      Great comment!

  • CliveM

    My objections are not that he is politically incorrect, but that, say mocking the disabled, is boorish, bullying, unpleasant, cowardly and simply bad manners.

    These are not the attributes of someone you’d want to be leader of any country, never mind the USA.

    Trump isn’t a blast of fresh air, he has however managed to hide his deep unpleasantness and unsuitability under a cloak of laddish rudeness. Any sane assessment of his promises, his equivocations, his Walter Mitty fantasy approach to leadership actually shows him not to be a change, but a culmination of all that is wrong with modern politics.

    Fortunately as President it’s unlikely he’ll be able to even get a fart through any of the Houses.

  • carl jacobs

    The Republicans had better figure out how to blow up the convention and get him off the ticket, or they will be eviscerated come November. Trump will fracture the party. His first task will be to get people like me to vote for him, but that isn’t going to happen. If Trump becomes the nominee, and the Republican party doesn’t repudiate him, I will leave the party. I will never vote for him. Not every dispirited Republican voter will make that same decision, but enough will reject him to divide his base. A candidate can’t win running against his own base. And I can’t imagine the attack ads the Democrats already have stacked and ready to go. Trump is what would call a target-rich environment.

    But … what if he wins? Trump would be a failed President before he took the Oath of Office. His rhetoric won’t impress the long-knives in Congress and the bureaucracy. They will skin him alive. He hasn’t a clue how Govt works. He doesn’t have any idea how to manage the politics of national Govt. He thinks he’ll be CEO and can just tell people what to do. He’ll find out he isn’t a very skilled player. Trump will make Jimmy Carter look competent.

    Better in the long run for Trump to lose. Better four years of Hillary than the fallout of a failed Trump Administration.

    • IanCad

      Quite amazing Carl, how you know all that.

      • carl jacobs

        Quite amazing, Ian, that you don’t. Failing to turn out the base is one of the quickest ways for a candidate to lose. And Trump will not turn out the base.

        I have basically two options. 1. Vote for Hillary. 2. Don’t vote. You should stop and consider what it means when someone like me would even consider voting for Hillary.

        • Uncle Brian

          From what I’ve read on other websites, people expect Trump to pick up quite a lot of votes among Democrats who could never bring themselves to vote for Hillary Clinton.

          • carl jacobs

            Before or after the Democrats shove that silver spoon down his throat. Before or after the Democrats carve up his plebian outsider image. Before or after the Democrats plaster the airwaves with all the stupid sh*t he has said. Before or after he makes all those horrible mistakes during the national campaign.

            Politics is a blood sport and he is walking like lamb into a pack of wolves.

          • Anton

            Carl: Please tell me not why you dislike Trump but why – specifically – you regard him as worse than Hillary Clinton.

          • carl jacobs

            Hillary Clinton may be a felonious evil vindictive malignant b****, but she is at least a functioning adult. She understands how to govern. You don’t give a loaded gun to a four year-old and you don’t give the Presidency to The Donald.

          • Anton

            Well, thanks for an honest reply. You are of the Anyone but Trump view. Were I American, I’d be of the Anyone but Hillary view. I think it’s that simple.

          • America and the world will survive a Clinton Presidency. A Trump one, Jack is not so sure. Trumps ‘opposition’ to homosexual ‘marriage’ and abortion, the only reasons to vote for him, is strategic and dishonest. He’s play acting.

          • Anton

            Those are not the only reasons to vote for him. He understands who the West’s most deadly external enemy is.

          • And who is that?

          • Anton

            Do you know what I mean, Jack? If so, no need for me to spell it out. If not, you will grow in the working out.

          • The West’s most deadly enemy is itself, Anton.

          • Anton

            Yes; a great civilization is not destroyed from without until it has destroyed itself within – Will Durant. That is why I asked who the West’s most deadly external enemy is.

          • But neither is Islam is an ‘external’ threat. It’s now part of the West. That’s the problem, isn’t it?

          • Anton

            It was wholly external a generation ago. When one is looking at entire civilisations, as Durant was, the timescale is more than human lifetimes.

          • It is your duty to vote for Hilary, Carl.

          • bluedog

            Carl, you have to vote Republican even though you deplore Trump. The GOP is a very important US political institution and it would be a disaster for your country if a failed president were to lead to a failure of the GOP. If members such as yourself take the irresponsible option of not voting and weaken the GOP, you simply defeat your own purpose. It’s the same in the UK. The base hates Cameron, but not voting Conservative simply ensures that a constellation of extremists on the lunar Left takes power.

          • carl jacobs

            Trump is not serious. He is a vanity candidate. He is playing a part in a reality TV show. This is all about him and his ego. I will never vote for him. I am far more worried about the first post-Trump election that this one. He would be a catastrophically bad President.

            This election will be bad because Trump will lose in an historic landslide. He will also take down the House and Senate. But a post Trump election would be worse.

          • bluedog

            ‘But a post Trump election would be worse.’

            And what about a post-Clinton election in 2024, (gulp)? If the pressure cooker is screwed down until then the constituency that Trump has awakened with the promise of power will be even more frustrated. It won’t be Trump that provides the release either, he’ll be too old. Whatever Trump offers, we need to see it sooner rather than later, that’s what democracy is all about.

        • IanCad

          “You should stop and consider what it means when someone like me would even consider voting for Hillary.”

          Means to me that you are much like the Senator from my former home in SC: Lindsey Graham. An excellent target for a recall election.
          It may give you some comfort to know that I am absolutely lousy at predicting US election outcomes, but, I consider the “base” a fluid constituency and as it will lose some, it will gain others. Most likely the gain will be enough to elect an energetic and interesting new male President.

          • carl jacobs

            That was McCain’s strategy in the 2000 primary – run against your own base and appeal to crossover voters. It didn’t work for McCain and it’s even less viable in a national election.

          • IanCad

            Carl,
            Nothing would have worked for McCain. He is a buddy of Lindsey Graham.

        • gerv

          You are assuming that Trump’s base is the same as the traditional Republican base. I think that, at the very least, that’s an assertion which needs significant proof, as all the evidence is he appeals to a different demographic.

          • carl jacobs

            That is because he is running as a Republican on the Republican ticket. If you think he is creating a new de facto party (that being the implication of a new base) you are wrong. About 60% of the electorate is fixed in one camp or the other. Trump can’t abandon his own base and try to make up the difference. He isn’t going to come close to pulling most of the swing 40%.

        • It is your constitutional duty to vote one way or the other. And please remember your promise if you do happen to vote for Hilary.

          • carl jacobs

            No, no. I have discovered an alternative. We can elect Hillary in order to impeach her.

          • Hmmm …

            Can she be impeached for a felon committed prior to assuming office?

          • carl jacobs

            Yes. Impeachment is a political act.

          • Still, your promise was unconditional.

          • carl jacobs

            New occasions teach new duties.
            Time makes ancient good uncouth.
            He must upward still and onward
            Who would keep abreast of truth.

          • Words from a poem written protesting Amer­i­ca’s war with Mex­i­co?! You are getting desperate.

          • carl jacobs

            That’s one of my most favorite hymns of all time. And it was fit for purpose.

          • Not “All things bright and beautiful” then?

          • carl jacobs

            Meh. It’s OK. If kind of boringly pastoral.

          • Anton

            Hillary is no peach.

        • … and then shooting themselves for having done so.

          • carl jacobs

            I’m beginning to think that you might have some mixed motivations here…

    • Uncle Brian

      Trump will make Jimmy Carter look competent.

      Is such an achievement humanly possible?

    • You may not vote for him but 1,000,000s of others will – as this nomination process has proven. Voter turnout is up – massively. Hispanics are voting for him. Women are voting for him. Blacks are voting for him. In fact, all the people who are supposed to hate him are turning out and voting for him instead of the other candidates (including the black candidates, women candidates and Hispanic candidates!).

      You are probably correct that the world of Realpolitik will not be kind to him, but the political establishment needs something nuclear to change it. Trump is it!

      Can’t believe you’d rather have Hillary Clinton turn your country into an extension of the EU, just as the EU is ready to implode.

      • IanCad

        Reb,
        Good points about his Black and Hispaniic support.
        I know plenty of both. The Hispanics don’t want any more of their brethren to come over the border. They recognize, as do the Blacks, that excessive immigration is paid for at the expense of the working poor.
        Same thing over here. The fog is clearing.
        The Hispanic and Black protesters are mostly students, professionals, and welfare recipients – none of whose livelihoods seem threatend by more immigration.

    • big

      the only fallout you’ll get from Hilary is of the nuclear type after she nukes Russia…….oh happy days……

    • Well, you won’t be alone in staying home in front of the telly on election day; most of the National Review staff writers and readers will also prefer to commit an honourable seppuku, not to mention many in the Tea Party and others who backed Ted. It’s this principled stand, a repudiation of cheap, calculating realpolitik, the demasgogues and the lunatic fringe, to try and keep one’s sanity and virtue, and to help scuttle a Republican victory right when the US faces a corrupt felon for a president and a Supreme Court stuffed with “evolving Constitution” socialist ciphers that will test the GOP spirit. My sincere regrets and best wishes…not that we up North are going to escape the effect.

  • sarky

    We all need a trump to rise up!!!

    (Pickled eggs and Guinness should do the trick)

  • Retired Paul

    Everyone knows that Trump is an idiot, but he seems to be reasonably straight talking. Is that worse than Hilary Clinton? She is generally reckoned to be very clever, but she shows distinct signs of being anything but straightforward.

    Overall, I am relieved that I am do not have to choose between these two options!

    • IanCad

      Paul, you wrote:
      “Everyone knows that Trump is an idiot–“
      Really?
      “IDIOT”
      In thenomenclature of retardation an idiot is somewhat dimmer than an imbecile, who, in turn, is rated as dopier than a moron.
      “HYPERBOLE”
      A pattern of speech much indulged in by those with an exaggerated imagination and limited vocabulary. Quite common among the British but less so among the, generally, more articulate Americans.

  • carl jacobs

    Maybe the Republicans can run a third candidate and get the election thrown into the House …

    • CliveM

      I don’t think they’ll risk it. They will write off this election and target the next.

    • William Lewis

      Surely there couldn’t be a better time for an independent to throw his hat in.

      • carl jacobs

        We can hope …

  • What a fantastic last paragraph Cranmer. Nail head, meet hammer.

    • IanCad

      Agreed! Absent the first two sentences.

  • Anton

    Meanwhile. what can Britain do to get an anti-PC man into power?

    • CliveM

      The term PC has been so abused it’s meaningless. If being anti PC involves mocking the disabled, I hope never.

      • Anton

        Let’s see what he actually said and let’s compare him not against Christ but against Hillary.

        • CliveM

          I don’t think not mocking someone’s disability makes you particularly Christ like or is a particularly high bar to measure someone’s behaviour against.

          • Anton

            I disapprove strongly of mocking anybody’s disability, but I want to know what he actually said before forming an opinion, and I question whether it is worse than Hillary’s involvement in Benghazi and promotion of abortion (including probably for the disabled…)

          • CliveM

            http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/worldnews/donald-trump/12019097/Donald-Trump-accused-of-mocking-disabled-reporter.html

            It’s hard to pin down exactly what Trumps position on abortion as he seems to back track on statements made. However I haven’t heard that he’s an abolitionist.

            Disliking Trump doesn’t make you a Hilary fan.

      • big

        I reckon not being PC would get you shunned and put on a disciplinary in many work places today.It’s……mind control….internalised by the masses ,ergo they control themselves………stroke of genius i say. Shame we can’t run the program for common sense!

        • CliveM

          I think the problem with the term PC is that it’s used as to broad a brisk these days. Not mocking someone’s disability or colour etc doesn’t make you a prisoner of political correctness, it makes you a polite and reasonable human being.

          • big

            Clive have you ever worked in local government?

          • CliveM

            No. I thought of applying for one once, got the application form, promptly lost the will to live.

          • big

            you made the correct choice, however i did work for local authorities and believe me when you have a mortgage to pay you will do and think in a certain way or your on a disciplinary. this isn’t about being nasty to people it really is about you internalising something you don’t agree with,your co workers will look down their noses at you, it’s actually frightening to be involved in it.

      • Royinsouthwest

        It is possible to be against rudeness and cruelty without being PC.

        • CliveM

          Really that’s my point. Abusing people for being disabled, black, females or whatever is boorish and I would call that politically incorrect. Challenging a cosy liberal consensus, is completely different. It’s often called being politically incorrect and the left try and close down the debate (think immigration discussion), but I think it is something else completely.

    • big

      …vote for Nigel garage

  • Uncle Brian

    Principal Skinner is alive and well and living in Fort Bend, Texas:

    http://joeforamerica.com/2016/05/school-calls-police-girl-using-2-dollar-bill-buy-chicken-nuggets-gets-worse/

    To be fair, though, neither Seymour Skinner nor the lovely Edna Krabappel ever took their comic bungling to such ridiculous lengths. When a 13-year-old girl attempted to pay for her school lunch with a $2 bill …

    The story seems to be a true one, difficult as it is to believe. And all these alleged “adults”, including the police officers, are, presumably, voters.

    • James Bolivar DiGriz

      I have heard of this before and, sadly, it seems entirely plausible. Two dollar bills are not that common so people rarely see them and think that there is no such thing.

      But the fact that the school officials just called the police rather than doing 30 seconds research and looking at
      https://www.treasury.gov/resource-center/faqs/Currency/Pages/denominations.aspx
      is rather dispiriting.

  • “America, your fired.”

    • carl jacobs

      First good laugh I’ve had today.

      Btw. You should fix the spelling.

  • len

    God sometimes sometimes gives us what we what we deserve …and Trump may be it….

  • Coniston

    Clinton or Trump as the next US president? Poor America. And poor Western World.

    • IanCad

      In general the elected president rises to the task. Some do better than others, but it does not take a very large blanket tover the sins and accomplishments of them all.
      There is an awful lot to be said for the selecting of a president from a hat.

      • Anton

        The man who mistook his hat for a President?

        • IanCad

          Funny that; my wife mentioned Oliver Sacks this morning when she mistook our neighbour’s cat for their dog.

          • Anton

            Don’t tell the cat!

          • IanCad

            The cat already thinks it’s the dog.

          • Anton

            Impossible: cats always think they are superior.

          • Linus must be a cat.

          • Allosexuel

            Dis wood explain ‘is fascination with his own and others bottoms.

      • Martin

        Ian

        Obama has failed to rise to the task, I doubt if either of the two favourites of the leading parties will rise any further than he. Could be God’s judgement upon that nation.

  • Politically__Incorrect

    “the triumph of political incorrectness” – I couldn’t miss a chance to comment on that one
    There is something about Trump that makes him stand head and shoulders above his more “cultivated” peers. That something is integrity. He has stood up to the idol of political correctness and not buckled under pressure or yielded to the puritanical prescribed condemnation of his opponents. In a modern day politician, that is extraordinary. In that sense he already looks like a winner. If I was American he’d get my vote. Whatever the outcome of the election, Trump will have changed the political narrative. He has broken the fear barrier and said those things which many believe but fear to articulate.

    • big

      He has a Teesside tan…….gets my vote.

      • Politically__Incorrect

        … and a womble wig. Vote Ugly I say

        • big

          oh he’s ugly…..but his wife looks tasty,in a strange kind of fake plastic way

    • “That something is integrity.”

      That is disputable.

    • dannybhoy

      I don’t know that I’d describe it as integrity, more likely Donald Trump saw how totally fed up the American electorate had become with their politicians.
      As someone once said, “You can fool some of the people all of the time, and you can fool all of the people some of the time; but you can’t fool all of the people all of the time.”
      The fact is that democracy has become infected by greed, cynicism, and special interest groups. There is no integrity any more, but Donald Trump is the only US Presidential candidate who had the financial clout to defy the rule of political correctness.

      • Politically__Incorrect

        I agree with you that Americans, like the British, are fed up with their politicians. When I talked about integrity I was thinking about how almost all the other politicians have caved in on things like the LGBT agenda, abortion, etc… It’s not easy to stand up against these goliaths in Western politics, and Trump could probably still have won the candidacy without speaking out on them. I would say he took quite a risk by bringing them into the debate. So, I conclude the guy does have some principles beyond making money, and that is very rare in politics these days.

        • dannybhoy

          One of the major differences between the American and British political systems is that they have far less choice on whom to vote for and there is little room for equivocating. You’re either a team player or you’re not. “You’re either for us or you’re agin us” which I think is all part of the behind the scenes power brokers’ strategy. Let the people have their elections, as long as it doesn’t threaten our interests.
          As I understand it The Tea Party was a real attempt by American citizens to try and halt the lack of accountability by government and its continued growth at the expense of free enterprise. They lost out because the big players and the vested interests that fund the two parties weren’t interested. There was nothing in it for them.
          Like the EU, modern US political thought is abandoning the principles that made it great and (especially under Barack Obama) turning to a socialist style of government.

  • Uncle Brian

    Your Grace, you link to the unfortunate tweet in which the Bishop of Guildford, Andrew Watson, contrived to shoot himself in both feet at once with his double-barrelled juvenile nonsense about Trump and Brexit.

    To Bishop Watson’s credit, however, it should be remembered that almost as soon as his election was confirmed in November 2014, he acted swiftly and energetically to muzzle the singularly unpleasant “anti-Zionist” vicar of Virginia Water, Stephen “Stinker” Sizer (link below). Watson’s predecessor in the diocese of Guildford, Christopher Hill, did nothing at all, as far as I can tell, in his nine-year term of office to discipline Stinker, though whether out of apathy or sloth or because he was an “anti-Zionist” himself is not clear.

    https://twitter.com/BishopGuildford/status/702592038504681472

    • CliveM

      He was made to do it. There was an intervention that forced his hand.

  • Happy Star Wars Day.

    May The Fourth be with you.

  • Inspector General

    It is indeed Political Correctness, or to be accurate, disdain for it that has thrown up Trump. You see, Political Correctness consumes the very supporters of it in the most unexpected of ways. These supporters who so despise the rest of us because they see themselves as victims of the rest of us are in for disappointment. It is what can happen to any human who is stupid enough to allow themselves to be encouraged to be annoyed with their lot. Well, they are soon to wail and sob under this next President. Good show, Trump, much is expected from you!

    Tally ho!

    • CliveM

      Where have you been? Thought someone would be needing to write an obituary!!!

      • Inspector General

        Greetings Clive. In the words of Gary Glitter at the Crown Court, “Hello Hello, I’m back again”. An Inspector returns…

        One’s venerable steam laptop stopped working completely the other day, so it was off to the boiler shop to patch the contraption and to have a new hard thing fitted. It’s rather aged now, coming up for its 5th birthday, and the Inspector was amazed to be told that these blighters aren’t designed to last much longer than that! Anyway, the truth is that the clever things have a cooling system built in that operates using a heat sink and fluid of some sort. Over time the fluid runs away and the device gets hotter and hotter. Eventually, and the Inspector bears witness to this, the machine will cut out after mere minutes.

        Now, you can buy cooling devices, fans mainly, that will aid in keeping the temperature down – google on ‘PC cooling’. Good Wiki article too ‘computer cooling’ about this rather hush hush matter that is never talked about by PC manufacturers. It’s almost as if they would rather you buy, at significant expense, a brand new whatsit from them. Surely not!

        Pip Pip!

        • Royinsouthwest

          Steam laptop? Was it built by Charles Babbage? If so it will be worth far more than any Windows machine or Apple whether it works or not!

          • Inspector General

            Cammell Laird of Birkenhead built it. It weighs tons….

          • The Explorer

            I was watching ‘Sink the Bismarck’ recently. They had computers even then to calculate the trajectory of the guns. But the computer required an entire room.

          • Anton

            And was not wholly electronic, even with valves, not by far.

          • carl jacobs

            Consisting of two four-cylinder inverted vertical triple expansion reciprocating engines rated at about 1000 HP each. Plus a low pressure turbine to power the disk drive. All fired by 24 boilers.

            The Inspector shovels a lot of coal.

          • Anton

            That wouldn’t be the Titanic’s spec by any chance?

            And I’d thought the Inspector used the computer which Noah had in the Ark, reconditioned marginally…

          • carl jacobs

            Totally a coincidence. Did I mention the requirement for 19 million gallons of water per day?

        • CliveM

          Thank you, I will check this wiki article.

    • Uncle Brian

      Hello again, Inspector. So what are they saying about Trump and Brexit over their scrumpy at the Mouse?

      • Inspector General

        It’s all Brexit at the Mouse, Brain. Nothing else matters. The tradesmen are rather looking forward to making some money again – you can’t compete against an Eastern European hot bedding it, and sending his undercutting money back to Poland…

    • Good to hear from you again. One did wonder if PN had finished you off.

      • Inspector General

        One now has enough anti virus to sink a battleship, Jack…

        • Anton

          Which virus did they send you?

          • That’s between him and his doctors …

          • Inspector General

            The blighters have yet to write to tell me…

  • Findaráto

    Clinton will be the next president. Trump can’t win against her. He’s too polarizing a figure.

    The comments predicting his victory remind me of similar comments predicting the defeat of the equal marriage bill. Or the massive victory of Ukip at the last election in Britain. Delusion is completely impervious to reality. What fun I shall have when the result is announced…

    • Ah, Linus, you have returned with your usual positive and constructive attitude.

      After your accusation that Jack was bearing false witness against you, he asked: “Are you denying you once posted here as Linus and have used a number of other identities since?”

      Did you knowingly falsely accuse Happy Jack of lying? You did, didn’t you?

      • The Explorer

        I don’t recall seeing an answer to your question. Is silence denial or consent?

        • Avoidance. Jack will show persistence until he gets an answer.

    • Inspector General

      And yes, queer marriage. Another reason to vote for Trump (Carl Jacobs, take note). There is no greater measure of how Western society is degenerating than two men in the ‘bridal suite’ buggering each other after some disgusting service joining them together…

      • Beg to differ, Inspector. The measure of Western degeneration is surely abortion. 40 to 50 million children killed every year. That’s 125,000 every single day. Think about those figures.

        • Inspector General

          You have a point.

          • It’s the human sacrifice made to the modern god of sex.

        • The Explorer

          At least gay marriage can’t be accused of contributing to the abortion problem.

          • Ah, but it does. Indirectly.

          • The Explorer

            True. It’s an outcome of the hetero mentality that wants childless sex.

      • carl jacobs

        Inspector

        The West is f___ed from one end to the other. Do you know what will fix it? Pain. Do you know the source of that pain? Poverty. Welcome to the future.

        It doesn’t really matter a tinker’s dam whether Republicans or Democrats win. They both reflect the same corrupt culture. The argument about gay marriage is lost. Judgment has come and it will not be set aside.

        • Inspector General

          A shiny new penny for you Carl if you vote for Trump…

          • carl jacobs

            You must think I’m easy.

            Tell you what. You get Jack to put on a Man City jersey, sing Blue Moon for the camera, and put it on YouTube with verification that it’s really him and you have a deal.

    • Allosexuel

      I weel need to hide poor Lupin from yoo.

      • The Explorer

        You’re too late. He’s had him already.

    • carl jacobs

      He isn’t polarizing. He’s an egomaniacal narcissistic idiot. When the real campaign starts the Democrats are going to (metaphorically) shove him face first into a wood chipper. This election could show a 30-35 percent vote difference by the time it’s over.

      • “He’s an egomaniacal narcissistic idiot.”

        Plus, he’s got small effeminate hands and a weird ‘comb-over’.

        • IanCad

          Hyperbole again Jack. See my earlier response to Retired Paul.

      • Findaráto

        Yes, he’s an egomaniacal narcissistic idiot – who also polarizes. It can’t be denied that he has significant support. But he’s either loved or loathed, and if barely more than half of Republicans love him, and every Democrat loathes him, it doesn’t take a genius to do the “math”.

        Presidents can only be elected if they manage to appeal to the middle ground and this is exactly where Trump fails to score.

        So the Democrats will pulverize him. Clinton will not only be the first female president of the US, she’ll also have an historic majority.

        What, I wonder, will then happen to the Republicans in Congress? Having fielded such catastrophic candidate in the presidential race, how will their credibility be affected in House and Senate elections?

        Clinton may come to power with an across-the-board majority that would give her a totally free hand. We can count on her entrenching a left-leaning bias in the Supreme Court that will endure long past the end of her term(s). Will she also socialise health care along British and French lines?

        What about severely restrictive gun control? And Wall Street heavily regulated? What other heresies will Republicans have to suffer over the next four years?

        How did it come to this? How after 8 years of one of the most decried (by Republicans, at least) Democrat presidencies in history is yet another Democrat poised to continue with, and even push significantly to the left, policies that Republicans ought to have been able to unite against?

        The GOP has turned into GOOP, but not the lucrative kind that noted Democrat and lifestyle guru Gwynneth Paltrow makes millions from. Clinton’s presidency will be a busy time for dear Gwynnie. Who can doubt that she’ll be appointed as Health and Wellbeing Commissar and immediately ban the sale of red meat? Grass juice and goji berry smoothies along with spirulina and tofu burgers will become America’s staple foods.

        The obese will be sent to fat camps and mercilessly body shamed by Gywnnie clones chanting mantras like “consciously uncouple yourself from your dependence on flesh food and embrace your inner mung bean”. Arugula Macht Frei, after all.

        Perhaps emigration would be your best option. But who would have you? Putin’s Russia, perhaps? Better start checking out your local Orthodox Church. That droning and fragrant liturgy takes some getting used to…

        • IanCad

          Stock up on eggs Findars you may need them in November.

        • bluedog

          ‘And Wall Street heavily regulated?’

          Learn some history. No Clinton has ever increased the legislative and administrative burden on Wall Street. Want low-doc loans? See a Clinton. Want to abolish the Glass-Steagall Act? See a Clinton. The list is endless and Bill Clinton’s final executive orders were directly responsible for the lax climate that lead to Lehmann in 2008. Now, who finances the Clintons?

        • The Explorer

          Don’t goji berries interfere with warfarin?

          • Findaráto

            So they say. But perhaps that’s all part of Hillary and Gwynie’s master plan. Feed the fatties with goji juice until they bleed out, and solve America’s obesity crisis in the first year of the new presidency!

            The benefits don’t stop there. Relieving the land of its heavy burden of blubber will surely cause it to rise apace with the oceans. America will keep its feet dry while its overweight neighbours all founder and sink beneath the waves.

            See, Hillary really is a prophetic leader who can rival even Moses. Her path to the White House has clearly been ordained by a higher power (like Warren Buffett, for example…)

      • IanCad

        For Heavens Sake Carl!! Knock off this “Idiot” nonsense. Your distaste for the man is veering towards the irrational.

      • Anton

        I agree that he’d find it harder to shift the levers of power than he expects, but what exactly do you mean by the Democrats shoving him face first into a woodchipper as part of their presidential campaign? They’ve pointed out his inexperience and all his faux pas and it’s only made him more popular. What ammo have they got left?

  • bluedog

    It’s been a long time coming, Your Grace, but somebody had to do it – challenge the dreadful ideological conformity that has swept the Western political elites. In the UK, Farage has come close but somehow fails to translate his presence into formal political power by getting elected. Previously in the US, the McCain-Palin ticket had elements of Trumpism and one wonders how the exquisitely politically correct Carl would have managed to vote then. Despite his role as a professional enfant terrible, Boris is definitely a creature of the current consensus, and unlikely to emerge as the British Trump once Cameron is forced to resign.

    Trump certainly promises to be transformative in terms of US foreign policy. He may provide unexpected opportunities for an independent Britain, post-Brexit, to break out of the suffocating shackles of the Special Relationship. Freed from the inhibitions of both the EU and the US, Britain could soar given imaginative and determined leadership.

    Your communicant is concerned that Trump will appoint his wife or a photogenic daughter as VP.

    • If we Britain Primaries how far might Farage have travelled?
      The Trumpettes are a worry ….

    • carl jacobs

      I voted for McCain. And you have no conception just how “non Politically correct” this decision against Trump is for me.

      • bluedog

        One can sense your pain, Carl.

      • CliveM

        I hate to mention this, but about. Year ago I mentioned that Clinton looked good for the Presidency????

        I don’t remember you saying you were thinking of voting for her!

    • IanCad

      Can’t imagine that either would be worse than VP Biden.

    • The Explorer

      Whatever else one says about him, he has splendid taste in wives and daughters.

      • bluedog

        If you like the escort agency look..

        • The Explorer

          He obviously does. By all accounts, the agency element doesn’t stop at the look.

  • chiefofsinners

    Donald Trump has many faults. The point is, the electorate has decided that political correctness is worse.
    There is now an opportunity on both sides of the Atlantic to destroy the arrogance of those who believe they are born to rule. It is time for the two greatest democracies on earth to reclaim their former glory.
    And the sun is shining. A Caucasian spring.

    • Personally, Jack sees it a sign of things to come and they are neither hopeful nor pretty. It’s akin to democracy sweeping Hitler to power because he broke the political mould and pandered to negative perceptions and fears.

      • Anton

        I don’t agree with the analogy, but I think things will get worse on Trump’s watch if he is elected mainly because people of the West are continuing to degenerate morally.

        • A sexual free-lancer, an adulterer, 3 times married; a nominal Christian, who doesn’t bring God into it when he sins. He’s the perfect President.

          Still, who is Jack to judge?

          • Ivan M

            The Americans had elected a godly President in George Bush, but he staggered into endless wars. Between mass slaughter and moral degeneracy there is little to choose. The fact is the GOP since after Nixon has taken advantage of the “moral majority” to fight wars and sell out the country for the interests of the rich. Most would be Republicans have this all this all figured out.

          • IanCad

            Are you alluding to President Kennedy Jack?

          • Ivan M

            JFK would be considered a borderline rapist today. In those days the women just had to smile and accept the unwanted attention.

      • chiefofsinners

        This is the fault of politicians who have for so long abused democracy. The people want their country back. Electing Trump may be the jolt that is needed.
        Trump is objectionable in many ways but he is no Hitler, and US democracy is too strong to allow him to destroy it. Hitler gained power because he offered an end to the very real injustices inflicted on the German people by the treaty of Versailles. Our politicians have not learned the lessons.

  • The man’s a swine ….

    (Trump) was known to have “bombarded” Princess Diana with expensive floral arrangements after her 1996 divorce from Prince Charles. “I only have one regret in the women department – that I never had the opportunity to court Lady Diana Spencer,” Trump wrote in 1997. “I met her on a number of occasions … She was a genuine princess – a dream lady.” ….

    Speaking on The Howard Stern Show three years after Diana’s death, Trump said he would have slept with her “without hesitation” and that “she had the height, she had the beauty, she had the skin,”while adding that “she was crazy, but these are minor details.”

    (Wiki)

    • CliveM

      A Cad of the highest order.

      • IanCad

        Mmmmmm—-?!

        • CliveM

          Oops

        • CliveM

          Now amended.

      • The Explorer

        The stone which the builders rejected?

    • Findaráto

      Now that I would have loved to see. St. Diana The Wronged Woman marrying The Donald. Is that where he got his inspiration for the hairdo?

      You can see why he wanted her. The ultimate trophy wife for the ultimate parvenu. Such a pity it didn’t happen. The benefits for the Republican cause would have been incalculable.

      Oh well, there’s always Harry. Maybe he’ll bring home a Kardashian. Or better yet, Nicki Minaj or Blac Chyna. He has enough of his mother’s instability to do something every bit that outrageous.

      Imagine the scene: Westminster Abbey. Blac slinking down the aisle in a dress the size of a postage stamp with the queen’s Girls of Great Britain and Ireland tiara screwed into her updo. I can’t wait! I may literally explode with glee!

      • Ivan M

        Your first paragraph is classic.

        • Anton

          Agreed!

      • Linus, you miss Jack’s question?
        After your accusation that Jack was bearing false witness, he asked you: “Are you denying you once posted here as Linus and have used a number of other identities since?”

        Did you knowingly falsely accuse Happy Jack of lying? You did, didn’t you?

      • For a few days I hoped Harry might bring home Justin, our fluffhead PM. The two hit it off rather well. Too bad; another hope dashed.

        You’re still an insufferable pain in the ass and a shit-head, but this one deserves an uptick. Woudl give you more, lots more…if I had as many handles as you.

    • CliveM

      I’ve read that she complained that his behaviour left her feeling stalked.

  • ‘Is he the Anti Christ?’

    Every American president in recent history has been suspected of being the Anti Christ, and not without reason. Each incumbent has presided over a further erosion of religion and morals, in a formerly Christian country.

    Now Trump seems to bear a closer likeness to the AC than even Obama, yet who can blame the American people if they elect him into office? Their faith in the democratic process and the US constitution – which seemed touchingly unshakeable, despite the record of the man they elect invariably proving himself a puppet to special interests – has now taken a jolt.

    In recent decades, leaders of so-called democracies have grown arrogant as well as deceitful, and no longer feel the need to hide where their real loyalties are. Voters are presented with no real choices at election time – only people who share nearly identical values, including a profound sense of obligation to their common paymasters and a total indifference to their voters.

    Electing Trump – despite his obvious lack of experience or discernible morals – into office will be an act of desperation by people who are fed up of being fooled. He plays on their fears, and his boorishness is mistaken for sincerity. His actions once in office will be an eye opener for all – it will expose their democracy as either a con to pacify and control the little man, or something of true value.

    • len

      One day their will be ‘the man of sin ‘ totally indwelt by the spirit of Satan(as Judas was)
      But there are many ‘anti-Christ’s’ now and throughout history.Some ‘against Christ’ some proclaiming to be ‘as Christ’ or’ another Christ ‘Jesus warned us of these.

      • Thanks for explaining it so well. I have to agree. Many Christians seem to think the final Anti Christ will be either a pope, an American president, a future leader of Israel or the Islamic Mahdi. I have no opinion on this myself; a hundred years from now – if Christ has not returned by then – the power dynamics between countries and continents could change significantly, and then the speculations on the identity of the future Anti Christ will change accordingly.

    • big

      i always said Obama wasn’t the problem,more a case of what follows…..so we have black man….possibly white women,then what? ….oh that’s it, trans gender thingy……then civil war?

  • len

    ‘Political Correctness ‘(the atheists answer to the Judeo /Christian moral code) has been exposed to be a totally hypocritical veneer over the most basic of problems humanity faces. Donald Trump (like him or hate him) has exposed all the failings of ‘Political Correctness.’
    The only real answer to the problems facing humanity (of course God knew this all along) is the new birth a new heart and a new spirit.All else is doomed to failure….

    • Ivan M

      To call the Christian moral code, Judeo-Christian is similarly an exercise in PC, though one that meets with general approval here. Whatever that was worthwhile in ancient Judaism had already been subsumed in the Christian synthesis. One might as well be honest and call this code, Judeo-Hellenic-Romano-Germanic-Christian since these are the roots of West as traditionally understood.

      • IanCad

        Excellent Ivan! Could we perhaps add Pagan to the list?

        • Ivan M

          Sure. Denying history is one of the means by which the PC brigade maintains its hold on the prevailing culture.

        • len

          Certainly feel free, Constantine did 😉

      • len

        I suppose that depends on what you define ‘Christianity’ as? In my humble opinion it is ‘a follower of Christ and His teachings’ not a follower of ‘religion ‘, but we could even argue over that?

        • Ivan M

          What is there to argue? In your own terms may I ask this: Is Christ the Messiah? Why then hyphenate what He represents? I ask this rhetorically since it is clear to me from your “Constantine” reference below, that the term “Judeo-Christian” serves to deny the authenticity of the Roman Catholic Church. We are Pagans and Marian idolaters. You on the other hand have found your way to the original wellspring before it was contaminated by the Papists. I pick up Protestant bullshit quite easily.

          • Anton

            I am as against politicised protestantism as I am against Roman Catholicism (which is overtly political).

          • carl jacobs

            It is hilarious to hear RCs complain about those who would deny the authenticity of the RCC. Have you not read your own church’s history?

          • Israel’s history wasn’t all that either and yet they remained the People of God. You’re confusing human and institutional sinfulness with the authentic mission and authority of the Church.

          • carl jacobs

            Actually I was just referring to the fact that the RCC bases its entire self-identity on being the sole authentic church. You call everyone else non-authentic and them get offended when you are called non-authentic. Humorous.

          • It’s the truth. Btw, Orthodox Christianity and some other churches are recognised as authentic too, but the fullness of truth is found only in the Catholic Church.

          • len

            You must be quite accustomed to bullshit the Popes have spread so much about?

      • Anton

        Christianity claims to be grace set in contrast to law, ie giving man the power to keep good laws, which man by himself cannot do. But what are morally good laws? Our nations still need legal codes, and the only divine template ever given is part of the Jewish scriptures. So the adjective Judaeo-Christian is perfectly justified.

        • Ivan M

          Morally “good” laws exist everywhere there is a functioning society.

          • Anton

            That’s not the point I am addressing. In ancient Israel, uniquely, there were no bad laws, because the law came from God not man. There were plenty of bad laws in ancient Rome.

          • Ivan M

            That is the point at issue here.

          • Anton

            Your major point is that you object to the phrase “Judaeo-Christian”. I object to your objection because society is about law and the social system, and that is exactly what most of the Old Testament is about, whereas there is no guidance about those things in the New Testament. Christians regard both Testaments as equally divinely inspired. I am perfectly willing to concede that our society also has pagan roots, if you wish.

          • Ivan M

            Your legal system has its roots in Roman Law and Greek reason along with the common practice of the Germanic tribes. Why is that not being acknowledged in the hyphenation if such a distinction is important?

          • Anton

            Good question. I am objecting essentially to your preference for historic Western society being called Christian when Christianity is not a social order.

          • Ivan M

            Then acknowledge it if required by multiple hyphenations.

          • Anton

            I don’t call Western society Christian, at any period. Whether Catholic or protestant it was a politicised form of Christianity and therefore inauthentic.

          • Ivan M

            But it is Judeo-Christian instead?

          • Anton

            I don’t myself call it that either, given its other roots – which you have accurately identified, but in that case you should not call it “Christian”.

          • God has also revealed this objective moral code is written on ours hearts and is accessible by human reason.

          • Anton

            But very fallibly, because our hearts have fallen; that is why Jeremiah says that God will write a new code on people’s hearts.

          • It’s why God has given us the Magisterium of the Catholic Church and guaranteed it the protection of the Holy Spirit..

          • Anton

            If I believed that I’d be a Catholic. I am not.

          • Ignorance … invincible or culpable? You continually demonstrate you don’t understand Catholicism.

          • Anton

            Just as Catholicism consistently demonstrates that it doesn’t understand the Bible.

          • But if you accept my criticism, then you are not qualified to make this judgement.

          • Anton

            I couldn’t give a hoot if you consider I am not “qualified” to make a judgement. Just argue with what I say and if you can knock it down, good for you.

          • If you don’t understand Catholicism then how can you possibly offer a critique of it?

          • len

            If you can understand Babylonian religions you can understand the RCC..

          • There you go, you have just proved Jack’s point.

          • len

            And you have proved you know very little about the RCC.

          • You’re simply demonstrating your ignorance, Len. In your case, because of your limitations, it’s probably invincible.

          • Anton

            I never said I don’t understand Catholicism; that is merely your opinion. Do tell me what you consider would “qualify” someone to pass judgement on Catholicism.

          • At the very least an understanding of her dogmas and doctrine. And, paradoxically, if one acquired this, one would not pass a negative judgement of the Church.

          • Anton

            So, as I pass a negative judgement, that means I don’t understand Catholicism? And it is because I don’t understand Catholicism that I pass a negative judgement? And you talk to me about invincible ignorance?

          • carl jacobs

            Heh heh heh.

          • You can shut up, as well.

          • carl jacobs

            What? I was just sitting here.

          • Anton

            Glad you like that one! By the way, you pointed out (rightly) that there was no inevitability in Cranmer’s setting of Mrs Proudie (as on the new thread) against TGI Mondays. The latter is still going on, on YouTube, if you are interested.

          • Got it, Anton.

          • Anton

            Eyes wide shut, Jack?

          • Once you are granted the grace understand the truth, you accept it.

            The only Christian church in existence for the first 1,000 years of Christian history was the Roman Catholic Church. All other Christian churches which exist today trace their linage back to the Roman Catholic Church. Most non-Catholic churches which exist today are less than a century or two old by comparison.

            In the end, it comes down to authority.

          • Anton

            It does, but the word is open to misunderstanding. Spiritual authority is not gained by burning people who refuse it and by a continual nostalgic looking back to the era of Roman Catholic absolutism in society. That doesn’t impress me much. Or secular people. Or Muslims. Or pagans.

            You are also mistaken in claiming that the only Christian church in existence for the first 1,000 years of Christian history was the Roman Catholic Church. In that era it called itself simply the Catholic church and Catholic was an adjective, not a name. Today the Vatican dislikes appending the word “Roman” because “Catholic” means broad yet Roman is specific. That’s a problem more for me than you. I don’t give a hoot about the apostolic succession, meaning of bishops; each new believer becomes part of a family whose tree goes back unbroken to the apostles and to Christ, because conversion is done of one person by another. The Apostolic Succession is merely a power-grab by politicised bishops. Can you quote any authority for it other than those bishops themselves?

          • Ivan M

            The Bible that Catholics themselves had put together. This is akin to saying that the Pope does not understand Catholicism.

          • Careful ……

          • Anton

            I thought you reckoned he didn’t!

            You might wish to call the early church Catholics; the Orthodox call them Orthodox, others call them protestant. I call them Christians.

          • carl jacobs

            Yep, Ivan is right. The RCC was instrumental in assembling the Scripture after the Jews returned from Babylon. There would have been no Scripture at the time of Christ except for that Magisterial decree.

          • Ivan M

            In the form that it came to you? Babylonian Jews had you in mind?

          • Anton

            You might wish to call the early church Catholics; the Orthodox call them Orthodox, others call them protestant. I call them Christians.

          • William Lewis

            A comment worth making twice. 🙂

          • len

            Popes have made up ‘Catholicism ‘as they go along ,each add their bit (much like a snowball rolling downhill gathering all sorts of items ) until it become a huge hideous mess….

          • len

            Probably right there Ivan, Popes have know to call other Popes ‘heretics’.There once was two Popes who called each other ‘heretics’ and then they promptly excommunicated each other.Only occasion when the Pope has been right!.

          • len

            Perhaps some Christians understand the RCC only too well?

          • Those that do are members of the Catholic Church. You’re not one of them.

          • len

            Thank God!.

          • It’s not God that prevents you seeing the truth in Catholicism.

          • len

            There is a small amount of truth in Catholicism mixed with huge amounts of error thats what makes it toxic far more toxic than Islam

          • Ivan M

            There you go.

          • William Lewis

            The “truth” of Catholicism is revealed in its checkered and heretical past. It clearly cannot be the one authentic church of Christ.

          • It’s human and institutional history is certainly “checkered” and we could discuss this forever. However, it has never made a doctrinal error and “heresy” is actually a departure from her teachings.

          • William Lewis

            “However, it has never made a doctrinal error and “heresy” is actually a departure from her teachings.”

            Yes, well you could make those kind of circular arguments forever too.

          • len

            Cannot understand how any Christian can also belong to the RCC?

          • You’d be surprised at how many protestants convert to Catholicism as they set about answering that question.

          • len

            Not this one whilst I still have my faculties.

          • That’s disputable.

          • len

            Some might agree with you, I would rather be a fool for Christ than a dupe of the RCC 😉

          • You’re not a fool for Christ, Len.

          • len

            1 Corinthians 3:18

            Do not deceive yourselves. If any one of you thinks he is wise by the standards of this age, he should become a “fool” so that he may become wise.

          • There you go … point proven.

          • sarky

            Have you not read the old testament???

          • Anton

            Yes; did you never digest it?

          • dannybhoy

            Indeed, Israel was the original “One Nation Under God..”

          • len

            Define ‘good’. Many Muslims would define Sharia ‘good’.

          • Ivan M

            Sharia is in the form of the Mosaic practice.

  • Anton

    Regarding another election that is taking place today, a man who has this track record is likely to become London’s first Muslim mayor:

    * Sadiq Khan wrote a ‘how to’ guide for people wanting to sue the police for damages. This guide advised readers that they could secure payouts of up to £10,000 from forces by alleging racist behaviour or claiming wrongful arrest.

    * He wrote to the Guardian in the wake of the 7/7 attacks blaming government foreign policy for terrorism.

    * He represented Louis Farrakhan in his bid to have a ban on him entering the UK overturned – a ban upheld by successive Home Secretaries since 1986. According to the BBC, Farrakhan has described Judaism as “a gutter religion”, characterised Christianity as an oppressive faith linked to the slavery of black people and called Adolf Hitler “great” (although he said later that he had meant “wickedly great”).

    * In 2004, Khan said: “There are some… uncontroversial areas of Islamic law which could easily be applied to the legal system… in the UK.”

    * In 2004, Khan shared a platform with five Islamic extremists at an event with segregated seating for men and women.

    * In 2007, Khan questioned the need to criminalise forced marriage when other remedies existed, calling it “ghetto” legislation that would reinforce the stereotyping of Muslims.

    See:

    http://www.christianconcern.com/our-concerns/islam/londonistan-with-khan

    • Ivan M

      Its OK. He wants to kick out Red Ken. All is forgiven.

    • bluedog

      If Khan gets up as London Mayor, the Boy George will have to reconsider his enthusiasm for this institution. It doesn’t take too much imagination to realise that if Khan is Mayor he will build a power-base that would enable him to potentially take over the rump of the Labour Party, post Jezza. Then politics are defined on religious grounds, Labour = Muslim Brotherhood, the secular rest = The Void.

  • The Explorer

    Predictive spelling is the proof that computers really aren’t that smart.

    • CliveM

      I keep meaning to switch it off, but then I’d have nothing to blame!

      • The Explorer

        There’s always Findarato.

  • The Explorer

    Bounder, Colorado.

  • disqus_95cZkgVTBl
  • Albert

    Trump’s ascendancy is a direct consequence of global political conformity to a certain mode; the insistence on a certain narrative orthodoxy

    This is an important point. Political correctness has undermined debate by effectively allowing certain positions to issuing a veto on certain arguments against them. In the debate about same-sex marriage, I remember one MP saying he found the argument offensive that allowing same-sex marriage removed the objection to incestuous marriage. It was noteworthy that he didn’t in fact answer the argument.

    The question ought to be “Is X a good argument?” If it is, it ought to have just force, regardless of whether it offends those who disagree with it. If it isn’t a good argument, someone needs to show why it isn’t a good argument.

    • Ivan M

      Trump basically destroyed the PC mould. That is about the only thing I can say in his favour.

      • Albert

        It’s funny. Obviously, I think there are problems with political correctness, and yet, I don’t like Trump as I find him so offensive!

        • Inspector General

          “Problems with political correctness” is understating it. Platform denying is PC’s son…

          • big

            yes i agree PC is like fasion it changes every season……very difficult to keep up with,all done deliberately in my experience.

          • Inspector General

            The only thing to be said in favour of PC is that you can no longer fear a punch in the face for saying the wrong thing. You are ‘shamed’ instead…

          • big

            Don’t get caught with a clenched fist you’ll be put straight onto an anger management course……afterwards your co workers will never look you in the eye again….tooooo dangerous

        • Ivan M

          Trump or Hillary marks the end of the “American Century”. An ironic coda to a nation that had produced so many great men. As the pundits say a Republic lasts but for 200 years. I personally got turned off Trump when he became all gung-ho over torture. Bernie Sanders had a chance to stop the rot but he is not thrashing Hillary as he should.

          • bluedog

            They’re all so old. Trump 69, Hilary ditto, Sanders 74, add two terms and they’ll all be geriatric. Trump will be lucky he doesn’t go the way of Pope John Paul 1 in some celebratory exertion. Now that would cause an upset.

          • Ivan M

            I think he is aware of the “grassy knoll” option. He seems to want to march on Washington in Mussolini fashion. Those deep state guys in the NSA and the armed forces are not wimps. If he goes around treating them like hapless “Apprentices” I won’t put money on his long term survival.

          • Albert

            For me the problem was what he said about Muslims. It made no sense, particularly, given his policy on guns.

          • IanCad

            His stance on torture is a very black mark against him. Apparently he has now modified his position, It is not wise for a presidential candidate to advise flouting the law, made so clear in the Constitution.

          • Ivan M

            He lost the Ron Paul faction of the Party right there with his cavalier attitude over torture. Embedding the practice in the daily routine of interrogators brings many evils in its train.

  • len

    D Trump is smashing through all obstacles like some sort of out of control Juggernaut and what started in the minds of many as a joke has become deadly serious.The Establishment in the US is sacred stiff of him because he will not play by their rules.One wonders when he will hit the buffers or perhaps he will be derailed before then?.
    PC is a an attempt to control minds through controlling speech a concept which Orwell portrayed very well in his nightmare vision ‘1984’ bit off on the year but everything else fits perfectly……

    • big

      he wont hit the buffers…no ..no …more a case of the bullet hitting his head….and then…yes, and then back to normal politics.

      • len

        This is a very real prospect i fear?

    • Findaráto

      Actually it isn’t the Establishment in America that’s “sacred stiff” but rather just a relatively small number of Roman Catholic priests…

  • Inspector General

    Think of Trump as another Winston Churchill, chaps. Keeping muslims out of entering the US is a genius idea and will save lives. As for building a wall on the Mexican border, sheer brilliance. Winston would approve…

    • dannybhoy

      Where did you sneak in from??
      You disappear like some Aborigine gentleman gone walkabout, and then Hey Presto! you re-appear with great insousiance…

      • Inspector General

        Keep up Danny. The Inspector explains all below…

        • CliveM

          Be kind, he’s getting on.

        • dannybhoy

          Where?
          I can’t see anything…
          (Probably deleted by the Administrator)

    • CliveM

      The only time Winston talked about walls (publicly as far as I’m aware) was in relation to the Iron Curtain. I think he saw that as a bad thing.

      • dannybhoy

        Clive do you subscribe to universal multiculturalism?

        • CliveM

          What on earth does that mean?

          • dannybhoy

            It means that the way forward is to encourage the recognition of cultural equality fostered within the framework of advanced western societies, who are willing to put aside their cultural distinctiveness, their historical social development and any sense of patriotism, so that other cultures might be free to express themselves…
            knowing that the ‘host culture’ will underwrite the costs involved.

          • CliveM

            Doesn’t seem like a good idea to me. Bit confused as to its relevance with regards my comment.

          • dannybhoy

            “The only time Winston talked about walls (publicly as far as I’m aware) was in relation to the Iron Curtain. I think he saw that as a bad thing.”
            Sorry Clive I thought you were intimating that Churchill believed in multiculturalism.. but he didn’t, he believed in the sovereignty of individual nations..
            http://history1900s.about.com/od/churchillwinston/a/Iron-Curtain.htm

          • CliveM

            Whatever Churchills virtues or faults, multiculturalism wasn’t one of them certainly.

            He also disliked the Iron Curtain, even though it stopped people migrating to the west.

          • dannybhoy

            would that we had more statesmen today of his calibre.

          • CliveM

            Churchill was a remarkable man.

    • Good Heavens, Inspector! Trump and Lord Winston in the same paragraph. I shudder at the comparison. Anyhow, welcome back.

  • David

    Having read as much as is available to me concerning Trump I’ve jumped off the fence. So now I’ve decided that if it takes an over confident, shoot from the hip, loud-mouth of a self-made mega-rich businessman like Trump to wrest politics off the PC establishment and return it to the people, then so be it.

    • big

      What happens if he loses?

      • David

        The PC, fake democracy, establishment juggernaut rolls on – for now anyway !
        But by deferring the inevitable – the day of the democratic “market” correction, the eventual political melt-down just gets bigger.
        That’s my gut feeling anyway.

        • big

          I agree, i think America is in for a very torrid time.

          • We all are.

          • The Explorer

            That is not nearly recognised enough, and cannot be repeated too often.

      • Not if, but when he loses.

  • Redrose82

    I feel for our American cousins, I really do. They do have poor candidates from which to choose. However, I do hope they go for Trump as the thought of President Hillary Clinton utterly sickens me. I mean how would you like a prospect of Prime Minister Cherie Blair?

    • The American’s deserve all they get for rebelling against rightful authority.

      • Findaráto

        Hello Front Room, the American’s what deserve all they get? His dogs, perhaps? What have these poor canines rebelled against? And which American do you mean? Is it Obama?

        So what terrible crime have the First Dogs committed that their entire country should be placed under interdict by the Holy Prophet Front Room in his role as God’s Spokesman and power behind the divine throne?

        • Are you denying you once posted here as Linus and have used a number of other identities since?

          You knowingly falsely accused Happy Jack of lying. What does that make you?

      • carl jacobs

        When did we rebel against George Washington?

  • bockerglory

    His Grace says “You may be appalled and horrified by his values, norms and amoral fantasies. You may be shocked by his gyroscopic character and detached sense of reality.”. His Grace is using this “Rhetoric” style and it shows us that this is what His Grace thinks of Mr Trump.

    Well I don’t think Trump is any more or less crude and vulgar than any other human being. It is funny how some people think they are more intelligent, cultured and refined than others. Such types are intellectual snobs and unfortunately His Grace has been caught out this time and is guilty. But alas! We are all human. I have had to work and advise many “intelligent, refined intellectuals” and they are all vulgar and common at heart and are “fallen” human beings. This is why we all need Jesus.

    Also in the telegraph today Fraser Nelson says that it is the “Low-educated, low-income white …. overwhelmingly men …” that is voting for Trump. I don’t think this is quite right! There have been plenty of others voting for him.

    So here is a message for His Grace and Journalists – admit you got it wrong on Trump initially, apologise and show some humility. Stop being “intellectual snobs”. Stop suggesting that his supporters are “inferior” humans – this is not Christ like. Supporting Trump does not mean an individual is inferior and “low educated”. Our Lord Jesus Christ didn’t have GCSE or a PPE degree from Oxford – and he was the Greatest Leader of all time.

    Trump is a RISK TAKER. So he will take the RISK of saying “no” to protect US trade and especially for those countries that are undertaking a price war against Western Economies by having a “race to the bottom” (e.g. low wage countries (CHINA MEXICO), currency wars (CHINA), energy price rigging (OPEC & SAUDI)).

    • IanCad

      Neither, let me add, is he any more crude and rude than one; William Shakespeare, whose broad minded and mighty saucy masterpieces have been celebrated so recently on this very same blog.

  • CliveM

    An interesting article on Trumps chances, especially for Carl

    http://www.bbc.com/news/world-us-canada-36201368

  • Agreed about what ails our conservative culture, Your Grace…again, excellently analysed and expressed… except for the bit with Trump as a prophetic artist and philosopher, not to mention the assumption that what he says would be done…or even that believes his own tag lines…unless, once again, I’m missing the legendary British sarcasm.

    The Donald is a life-long Democrat, a long-time friend of the Clinton dynasty, an opportunist who cheats, bamboozles and shows off. Politically he is abysmally ignorant except for one crucial part; like Putin, Obama, J. Trudeau and others, he knows instinctively, by feral instinct apparently, what people want to hear. And, like a clever businessman and marketing man, hints, suggests and feeds back people’s own fantasies, excites their proverbial hopes and dreams and promises the undeliverable. Should he get to the White House, with his chintz and imported models, he will make a bit of a mess of things, although together, administrations, the thousands of careerists, the House and the Senate are quite capable of putting the brakes on anything outright dangerous or totally insane.

    Alas, to the dismay of the “alt-right” who came out of the woods for him (literally, in some cases) and the anti-establishment Repubs, there will be no bans on Muslims, no wall between Mexico and the US and no industrial and commercial renaissance based on his vague and impractical idea of raising tariffs. How do I know? For one, even Trump himself has wavered and changed his mind on these issues right in the middle of primaries. Also, one needs to look at his long record in business dealings.

    It’s not only the demagoguery, the sexism and crudeness which may be fine at a bar after a couple of beers or good for the shock effect on a blog comment. Barely reported is the upsurge of hope riding on the vague “make America great again” slogan. In mimicking Obama, the pied piper who raised the hopes of poor American Blacks (and made their lives even harder in the end), The Donald ignites the dream of the lower class Whites across the US, a dream which can be described so: Jobs where a good old boy, without even high school education could turn a wrench on a gewgaw all day and make thirty buckaroos per hour, and all the benefits one can dream of, and for those too lazy, drugged out, obese or moronic, more Food Stamps and Disability. For the illegals in the country and the enfranchised Hispanics, Donald’s airy promise of a wall is negated by his on-the-record flip-flopping and not-too-subtle promises of a full amnesty.

    But none of this is really new, Your Grace. Elites rise and bog down our economy, institutions and culture with their greed and restrictions, enrage the citizenry with their contempt and like night follows day, the demagogues appear, promising the moon. They never deliver of course, but it doesn’t matter; all they are gunning for is a place at the table, power, and a bigger slice of the pie. It’s the old monster we now call “fascism,” the civilization-destroyer stalking the weakened Polis, the one our Classics had different names for and we looks like we’ll be “privileged” to see it in real-time everywhere, because surely the Donald and his Trumpkins won’t be the last or the only ones. Just as an aside, has anyone seen my yellowing copy of Jose Ortega y Gasset’s Revolts of the Masses?

    • CliveM

      Excellent post Avi.

    • IanCad

      Avi, You seem to have, as Carl, an abiding dislike of the man. Can’t see where he’s any worse or much better than any other pol in Washington. Or anywhere else for that matter.

      • You havent been following the nomination as closely as Carl and I have probably. It’s not just Trump, but his core supporters, who have exceeded The Donald in vileness and stupidity.When klukkers and neo-Nazis become “politicall engaged” for the first time I can remember, you have to wonder about the candidate. Not that I think he’s a Mussolini or a Putin, but like Obama, he is an exploiter of the angry, the poor and the terminally stupid.

        • IanCad

          Avi,
          The KKK and Neo-Nazis are such a small proportion of the electorate. My take is that many voters see him as being able to repatriate jobs that have gone overseas, perhaps capable of keeping immigration to reasonable numbers and offering some hope that the working people of the USA may at last see a remedy to their declining paychecks.
          I do believe Reagan was held by many in the same low regard as is Trump.

          • Uncle Brian

            Ian, the first time Reagan ran in the Republican primaries was in 1976, when he had already been governor of California for eight years. What has Trump ever governed? Quite apart from his personal shortcomings, which have been aired here often enough, it looks like yet another case of the successful businessman who is tempted to think that his skills and experience can be harnessed to the national purpose. Two such cases in Britain that spring to mind (admittedly going back a few years) are Cecil King of IPC and Jimmy Goldsmith of Cavenham Foods. Remember those two?

          • IanCad

            UB,
            I do remember the 1980 race and I stand by my statement. The vitriol spouted against Reagan was vey similar in tone to what Trump is receiving today.
            This post should not be held as an endorsement of either.

          • It doesn’t matter hiw small the unhinged are; Trump exploited them to intimididate his opponents and critics with threats and turned a blind eye to their thuggery…and even invited it at times.

            I know how voters see him. And in their desperation they are projecting on an utter fraud who will exploit them, again, if he gets a chance. They are idiots, plain and simple. Idiots like millions of other idiots the world over throughout history who handed the reigns of power to Big Men with Big Promises and got buggered in the end, only to repeat the process again, several times in their lifetimes.

            This is new for the post-War democratic West; we are starting to behave like Russians and Africans, rallying behind flashy show-offs and demagogues, hoping for miracle Cargo. We may have reached the point of no return.

            And no, Trump does not compare in any way to either Reagan or Churchill, for goodness’ sake!

          • Uncle Brian

            This is new for the post-War democratic West; we are starting to behave like Russians and Africans,

            You might have included Latin Americans. Look at Venezuela today and Argentina up till a few months ago, where Macri is described as the first democratically elected non-Peronist, non-Radical president since 1916. We hope to be making a similar change here in Brazil in a matter of days, though Michel Temer, currently vice president and presumably soon to be president, is really just yet another old-fashioned wheeler-dealer.

        • dannybhoy

          I would say that even the poor and the terminally stupid deserve our respect as human beings.
          Those who are poor may be so because of a lack of education and opportunity. I’m no soft liberal, but as a Christian it seems to me that the cynical and powerful prefer to keep some people poor, and yes there are stupid people around, but they can be given dignity and kept from those who would exploit them.
          Am I my brother’s keeper?
          Yes I am.
          Everything you say about Donald Trump may be true, I don’t know. But I have no confidence whatsoever in Hilary Clinton, and I think the movers and shakers of America have sold their souls to the gods of materialism and manipulation.

          • Danny, I’m just giving you my view of Trump’s strategy….which simply put, is Obama’s own, but directed at the Whites. God bless the poor and the lame in body and mind, of course, but God help a nation that takes their advice on governance or installs a leader of their choosing.

          • dannybhoy

            Oh I respect your views Avi. You’re an intelligent and well read man.
            I am just contrasting this stuff with the way God shaped the people of Israel as a nation. There were dumb people then too. But I think that God in all His wisdom, resourcefulness and love wants His people to look after each other. Not that the dumb sit on their bums as it were, but the bright people, the go getters recognise that even the dumb are precious in His sight, and even the dumb can contribute something to society if given the leadership and opportunities.
            It’s all a matter of how you view them.
            And that is what makes me sad about where political America is moving to.
            They no longer believe in America. They outsource to maximise profits, they exploit the young and poorly educated, they honour those who have made it whilst ignoring how they made it.
            America is no longer a vibrant nation but a dying one, with all kinds of maggots and parasites feeding off her, eager to make another buck while they can.
            I had hoped that perhaps Donald Trump was playing a very clever game, but maybe he is indeed no better than the others. That will be very sad for America, and even worse for the free world.

          • dannybhoy

            By the way Avi, did you think anymore about CGI pictures like Robert Zebecks has made?

          • The Republican electirate, independents and even a few stray former Dems whi couldn’t stomach a choice between an aging felon and an aging socialist had a reasinable choice; Ted Cruz. He was not “establishment” nor a RINO (Rep’n In Name Only), had experience in government and is a brilliant Constitutionalist with concrete plans on addressing the very problems everyone worries about.

            But, he’s not a celebrity, warm or personable, nor a flashy billionaire with a harem of imported Slavic “models.” Worse, he treats people as if they intelligent, diesn’t rile them up and doesn’t promise the impossible.

            Apart from that, I won’t compare 21st century America to the Bronze Age Fertile Crescent in order to excuse the idiocy if the masses. Yes, we’re in deep doodoo now, and not just the Yanks either.

          • dannybhoy

            “Apart from that, I won’t compare 21st century America to the Bronze Age Fertile Crescent in order to excuse the idiocy if the masses.”
            The bronze age fertile crescent where God revealed Himself to mankind, specifically Avram..
            When it comes down to it Avi, people will always disappoint you, and even more galling, we will disappoint people.
            I think your Jewish Scriptures give dignity to mankind, and they can still be adapted to people’s needs today. Example: Israel and the Ingathering..

          • Ha! You flattered me too many times already, old friend, but thanks for that; it gladdens the soul as I’m all alone this shabbat, for the first time in years…with everyone flown for a post-Passover vacation either to the end of this continent or to another one. I’m making dinner as I always do and even thought of setting everyone’s plates. That would be balmy and pathetic, with no one to appreciate my self-pitying melodrama (plus I’d have to wash them again!).

            Off to struggle with chickens and wine now, boys, have a good weekend!

          • dannybhoy

            It’s not flattery Avi, more appreciation.
            Recently I have been learning that people are not lovable because they are perfect.
            Nor even because they are flawed.
            They are lovable when they stop pretending, hold up their hands, and say “Hey, I’m so much a fraud I have no more excuses to offer.”
            That’s when true love starts to flow and heal.

          • Anton

            Isn’t Cruz married to Goldman Sachs?