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“The devil’s arm grows longer by the minute…”

Goodness! In the light of recent events in Parsons Green, the ever-dynamic government of Sharia Dismay has taken action, as I discovered when I called in at Mr. Ballcock’s Ironmongery on the High Street the other day.

“Good morning, Mr. Ballcock,” I said in my most cheerful manner, “I wish to purchase a bucket.”

There was a sharp intake of breath from behind the counter.

“Certainly, Mrs. Proudie,” replied Mr. Ballcock, “but only if you can supply the right documentation. You need an official permit to buy buckets now – it’s all part of this anti-terrorist crack down.”

“Alas, I have no documentation, but surely you recognise me as the Bishop’s Lady?”

“That’s as may be,” said the ironmonger, “but the regulations state that any attempt to buy a bucket without producing a passport, birth certificate, family tree going back ten generations, notary’s certificate stating you have never purchased or read a Koran, full set of finger prints, bank details and oath of loyalty to the Crown, means I have to report you to the constabulary as a potential Jihadist.”

I left without a bucket.

The Archdeacon faced similar bureaucratic obfuscation when he attempted to hire a pony and trap to visit some of our outlying parishes, his own barouche being currently out of action.

“What the blazes do they think I am going to do with it? The insolent pipsqueak at Hackney Carriages-Are-Us presumed to lecture me on ram-raiding and mounting the kerb in such a way as to endanger life and limb. Why would I want to raid a ram? Why can’t these head-up-their fundament boil-in-the-bag Communist Purpose poltroons address the real issue of terrorism and stop devising Machiavellian legalistic contortions to make life damned unpleasant for the law-abiding and increasingly put-upon decent majority?”

Why indeed.

On Tuesday, I attended Countess de Courcy’s afternoon tea party. The Countess, fresh from court, had much to say about the so-called ‘Palace Coup’ initiated by the Prince of Wales in order to smooth his pathway to the Throne. According to courtier’s gossip, Her Majesty’s private secretary and the Prince have locked horns, the former having advised the latter to drop a number of favourite causes and projects which, when king, might embarrass the Monarchy, such as ‘Forward to Feudalism’,  ‘The Anti-Carbuncle Alliance’ and  ‘The Restoration of German Princes Fund’. We ladies agreed the Prince had caused considerable embarrassment already, notably in marrying that Keppel strumpet, those toe-curling sanitary endearments and talking codswallop to selected shrubbery. Lady Arabella Gresham asked if my Lord the Bishop would play a part in a future coronation: alas, Barchester is not one of the senior ecclesiastical sees, so the answer is no; but, given half a chance, I’d be more than happy to crown Charles III… with my umbrella.

The Countess wondered if Meghan Merkel was related to the Reichskanzler in Berlin. I couldn’t comment, but it does looks suspicious. German marriages are what made the Monarchy what it is today… dull as ditchwater.

My Lord the Bishop and I are planning our annual visit to the Cheltenham Literature Festival, though we are somewhat disappointed that Mr. Dickens and Miss Bronte will not be attending as both are dead. Understandable, one supposes. We shall of course avoid the dreaded Hildabeast and her entourage, there to peddle her book on the recent presidential election entitled, ‘Infamy, Infamy, they all had it in for me!’ or something like that. She blames everyone but herself, poor deluded thing, as she transitions from pant-suited powerhouse to post-politics Miss Haversham.

Mr. Slope tells me the Campaign for Transgenderisation has reached the shores of the Antipodes, where a referendum is about to take place. It’s all about Bruce marrying Bruce, and Sheila marrying Sheila, though marriage is not what it is and that’s a fact. Well, I suppose those jolly swagmen can do what they like with their billabongs, and what they keep in their tucker-bags is entirely their own affair, though I am sure it will frighten the kangaroos (horses being in short supply). As far as I’m concerned, it shows the devil’s arm grows longer by the minute (a bit like Mrs. Dismay’s nose).

I read The Jupiter’s report of President Trumpelstiltskin’s speech to various ambassadors and heads of government in New York with interest. He declares he would always put the United States – and the interests of Americans – first. How refreshing, and how so unlike our own dear Prime Minister, who couldn’t give a goose-turd for her own people. The President made it clear that, should the United States be attacked, he would respond will full force. What on earth is wrong with that? What do liberals expect him to do? Nothing? He also roundly condemned communism and socialism, the blessings of which we have yet to see in reality – but then again, perhaps we have!

Mrs. Dismay’s later speech to the same assembly showed her for what she is – a globalist, neo-Marxist incompetent who twitters on about justice and freedom whilst suppressing liberty at home; a vicar’s daughter who is wet with desire for the Saracen and more concerned with refugees than the indigenous Briton. Shariah May is no conservative: she will scupper Brexit and pledge billions of pounds to the Zollverein even after we have left. That which calls itself The Conservative Party is but a chimera – it wears a blue burkha to disguise the traitors hiding within its folds. It is like the Norwegian Blue Parrot, having fallen from the perch of sanity long ago. It is dead.

It deserves to lose the next election, even if we have to suffer the emetic of Corbyn Monoxide for a while. It might just bring the nation to its senses. There again…

I feel better now, or I will after a soothing Earl Grey and a freshly-baked hobnob. I might even allow myself two, as I am quite wound up. I am well aware there are storms and earthquakes to write about, let alone the mischief going on in Burma, but these must wait.

So, as Shariah May sheds the seven veils of integrity whilst belly dancing to the seductive nose-flute of Soros and the combine harvester of authoritarianism scoops up the ripening corn of civil liberties, I bid you all a fond farewell for now. Should the good Lord spare me, I shall be scribbling again next week.

  • Gregory Morris

    Blimey. A bit apocalyptic, Mrs P. Enter right: Mr Jacob Rees Mogg

    • Maalaistollo

      JRM is certainly unimpressed by the Dismay negotiating stance. See http://www.express.co.uk/news/uk/857725/brexit-jacob-rees-mogg-eu-theresa-may-conservative-party

    • Chefofsinners

      Are you not aware that this is end-of-the-world day? Exit left the Church. Anton explains all on the previous thread. All very plausible were it not for the scripture “No man knoweth the day or the hour.”

      • Anton

        Are you one of those who reckon that no man will know the day or the hour even six years into a peace treaty cut by a world dictator with Israel one autumn and broken by him two-and-a-half springs earlier?

        No man knew the day or the hour when Jesus spoke, to be sure. Not even He did. But he gave the signs to look for, and did not do so for no reason.

        Allow me to add that I wrote on the preceding thread, “the theory has more going for it than some, but when all is said and done I think it is wrong.”

        • Chefofsinners

          I am one of those who reckon that the day and the hour will be before any such peace treaty. And that it will come like a thief in the night.

          I think we would agree that the current Rev 12 theory is unlikely to be correct.

          • CliveM

            Should we be worried by our continuing existence? Have we been “left behind “?

            Has anyone checked any RC blogs?

          • Sarky

            My understanding was that the disciples expected jesus back in their lifetime. Also, that revelation makes sense in the context of the time but not as a prophecy for two thousand years later.

          • Anton

            The disciples expected Jesus back in their lifetime? Sarky, when that conversation took place they didn’t even expect him to get crucified and depart! Your Bible knowledge is lacking.

          • Sarky

            For the Son of Man is going to come in his Father’s glory with his angels, and then he will reward each person according to what he has done. I tell you the truth, some who are standing here will not taste death before they see the Son of Man coming in his kingdom.” – Mt. 16:27,28

            “Tell us, when will these things be (the destruction of the temple), and what will be the sign of your coming, and of the end of the age? . . . This generation will not pass away until all of these things take place.” – Mt. 24:3,34

            “Behold, I am coming soon! (tachu – quickly, speedily (without delay)) Blessed is he who keeps the words of the prophecy in this book.” – Rev. 22:7,12,20

          • Anton

            Regarding Rev 22, Jesus had already said on the Mount of Olives that the gospel would first be offered to all peoples – living in all lands – while the Book of Revelation speaks of the whole world under the thumb of one man of evil. That will take a while but, in context, there will be no delay once those things have happened.

            Matt 24 – Jesus mingles (intentionally) his description of the destruction of the Temple with the description of the End of the Age. His words “This genea will not pass away until…” EITHER refer to the generation who heard his words and to the destruction of the Temple less than 40 years later; OR genea means race/people, ie the Jews – and they are indeed still around, unlike everybody else who has been kicked off their land for so long.

            Matt 16 – to understand this verse you should recognise that Jesus is referring to Daniel 7:13-14, where the unusual phrase “son of man” first entered scripture:

            behold, One like the Son of Man, coming with the clouds of heaven. He came to the Ancient of Days, and they brought Him near before Him. Then to Him was given dominion and glory and a kingdom, that all peoples, nations, and languages should serve Him… His kingdom is the one which shall not be destroyed.

            This happens when God gives Jesus his kingdom, ie at the Crucifixion and Resurrection. His kingdom is the collective of his people, ie the faithful church. Probably you are assuming that this verse refers to his second coming. More detail:

            http://www.ligonier.org/blog/some-standing-here-will-not-taste-death-unfolding-biblical-eschatology/

          • Manfarang

            Matt 24
            The desire to bring the words into more apparent harmony with history has led some interpreters to take “generation” in the sense of “race” or “people,” and so to see in the words a prophecy of the perpetuity of the existence of the Jews as a distinct people till the end of the world. But for this meaning there is not the shadow of authority; nor does it remove the difficulty which it was invented to explain. The words of Matthew 16:28 state the same fact in language which does not admit of any such explanation.

          • Anton

            I advise you to look up the relevant verse at biblehub.com and use the Greek and Lexicon options which tie the original words to standard dictionaries of ancient Greek. Anyway, even if you reject GENEA as a synonym for ETHNOS in this case, there is an alternative interpretation which I gave.

          • Manfarang

            Lets not forget the original words were spoken in Aramaic.

          • Anton

            Betcha it was Hebrew actually.

          • Manfarang

            Allen C. Myers, ed. (1987). “Aramaic”. The Eerdmans Bible Dictionary. Grand Rapids, MI: William B. Eerdmans. p. 72. ISBN 0-8028-2402-1. It is generally agreed that Aramaic was the common language of Palestine in the first century AD. Jesus and his disciples spoke the Galilean dialect, which was distinguished from that of Jerusalem (Matt. 26:73)

          • Sarky

            For me, revelation makes sense in the context of the times. Using gematria, which as you are aware, was a common tool of the time, 666 become ‘nero ceaser’. The 12 headed beast is clearly rome.
            Revelation clearly refers to the persecutions of the times and is written to give hope to christians living through it.

          • Anton

            I’m glad that you find the Book of Revelation so easy to understand.

          • Sarky

            It is if you don’t make it all mystical and supernatural.

          • Chefofsinners

            Your interpretation ignores the book’s own introduction. “Write, therefore, what you have seen, what is now and what will take place later.” chapter 1 verse 19.

          • Sarky

            Probs not talking about 2000 years later though is it??
            People tend to write about what they know and see, revelation is no different. If you were being persecuted and wanted to get a message out, dont you think you’d do it in code???

          • Chefofsinners

            Clearly is talking about 2000 years+ later, ‘cos it hasn’t happened yet.

          • Sarky

            Or, like im trying to say, it already happened 2000 years ago.

          • Anton

            Angels aren’t supernatural?

          • Sarky

            Not the ones who ride bikes.

          • Anton

            I’ve yet to find that in the Book of Revelation.

          • Anna

            “Now learn this lesson from the fig tree: As soon as its twigs get tender and its leaves come out, you know that summer is near. Even so, when you see all these things, you know that ite is near, right at the door. Truly I tell you, this generation will certainly not pass away until all these things have happened. Heaven and earth will pass away, but my words will never pass away.”
            (Matthew 24:32-35 NIV)

            The fig tree represents Israel. Christ prophesied the destruction of Israel. The restoration of Israel is a sign that the final age has begun. The generation that ‘will not pass away’ could mean either the generation born in 1948 or the generation to be born at the spiritual restoration of Israel.

          • dannybhoy

            In this instance dear Anton, you are wrong and our resident sceptic is right. The disciples/apostles did expect that our Lord would return ‘soon’ as in (I think) their life time..

          • Anton

            How could they expect him to return if they weren’t expecting him to leave?

          • dannybhoy

            Matthew and The Great Commission
            16 Then the eleven disciples went to Galilee, to the mountain where Jesus had told them to go. 17 When they saw him, they worshiped him; but some doubted. 18 Then Jesus came to them and said, “All authority in heaven and on earth has been given to me. 19 Therefore go and make disciples of all nations, baptizing them in the name of the Father and of the Son and of the Holy Spirit, 20 and teaching them to obey everything I have commanded you. And surely I am with you always, to the very end of the age.”
            Mark

            Mark 16English Standard Version (ESV)

            The Great Commission
            14 Afterward he appeared to the eleven themselves as they were reclining at table, and he rebuked them for their unbelief and hardness of heart, because they had not believed those who saw him after he had risen. 15 And he said to them, “Go into all the world and proclaim the gospel to the whole creation. 16 Whoever believes and is baptized will be saved, but whoever does not believe will be condemned. 17 And these signs will accompany those who believe: in my name they will cast out demons; they will speak in new tongues; 18 they will pick up serpents with their hands; and if they drink any deadly poison, it will not hurt them; they will lay their hands on the sick, and they will recover.”

            19 So then the Lord Jesus, after he had spoken to them, was taken up into heaven and sat down at the right hand of God. 20 And they went out and preached everywhere, while the Lord worked with them and confirmed the message by accompanying signs.]]

            Luke
            45 “Then he opened their minds so they could understand the Scriptures. 46 He told them, “This is what is written: The Messiah will suffer and rise from the dead on the third day, 47 and repentance for the forgiveness of sins will be preached in his name to all nations, beginning at Jerusalem. 48 You are witnesses of these things. 49 I am going to send you what my Father has promised; but stay in the city until you have been clothed with power from on high.”

            The Ascension of Jesus
            50 When he had led them out to the vicinity of Bethany, he lifted up his hands and blessed them. 51 While he was blessing them, he left them and was taken up into heaven. 52 Then they worshiped him and returned to Jerusalem with great joy. 53 And they stayed continually at the temple, praising God.”

            John
            20 “Then Peter, turning about, seeth the disciple whom Jesus loved following; which also leaned on his breast at supper, and said, Lord, which is he that betrayeth thee?

            21 Peter seeing him saith to Jesus, Lord, and what shall this man do?

            22 Jesus saith unto him, If I will that he tarry till I come, what is that to thee? follow thou me.

            23 Then went this saying abroad among the brethren, that that disciple should not die: yet Jesus said not unto him, He shall not die; but, If I will that he tarry till I come, what is that to thee?

            24 This is the disciple which testifieth of these things, and wrote these things: and we know that his testimony is true.

            25 And there are also many other things which Jesus did, the which, if they should be written every one, I suppose that even the world itself could not contain the books that should be written. Amen.”

          • Chefofsinners

            Anton said “when that conversation took place”. Obviously once Jesus had left they knew He would return. And yes, they were expectant. I try to live every day expecting that Jesus will return in my lifetime, because He could. This has always been the case for every Christian.

          • Anton

            It could not happen in the absence of globalisation, which really got going at the Industrial Revolution, and until the Jews had returned to the Holy Land. Was that understood before it happened? Actually Yes, some of the English Puritans foresaw these criteria.

          • dannybhoy

            Luke 18:8
            There are lots of verses where our Lord tells the disciples what will happen..
            Luke 21 25….

          • Anton

            But they didn’t get it. They never expected the Crucifixion.

          • dannybhoy

            Well that is true, they had the Jewish mindset that the Messiah would come as King and deliver Israel from all her enemies and bring justice and blessing.
            I believe that some Jewish sages believed there would be two Messiahs, one the Suffering Servant and one the great King.

          • dannybhoy

            I think the general tenor of New Testament scripture bears that out.

  • bluedog

    One lies prostate at your feet, Mrs P, in recognition of your superior judgement of the May harridan. Her speech in Florence has no equal since a certain speech made on return from Munich by one of her Conservative predecessors.

    One can offer a translation of Mrs May’s speech in Florence, ‘Phillip and I have been discussing retirement and where and what we might do. On our recent summer holiday we thought a lot about Tuscany and we did some on-line searching. It turns out the there was a wonderful villa/flat/apartment for sale not far from Florence and on the spur of the moment we made an offer, which has been accepted, and we have put down a deposit. Frankly, this whole Brexit thing is a dreadful drag. The Cabinet is hopelessly divided and the civil service completely opposed to the whole idea. Phil Hammond has persuaded me to put the whole thing on ice while he and Sir Christopher Heywood sort out a reasonable compromise of some sort with the EU. David Davis hasn’t got a clue. I’ll continue as PM for another two years (wouldn’t it look awful if I chucked it in now?) and then I’ll resign and let them sort it out of they can.’

    Without question, Boris could see this coming. Now is the time for him to keep faith with the electorate, draw a leadership group around himself and shoulder M/s Dismay out of the way.

    • dannybhoy

      But not Boris, bluedog. He blew his chances of being taken seriously whilst still mayor of London. A new haircut won’t change a thing..
      The real problem is that we lack true leaders, men and women of conviction. We have been breeding ‘placemen’ and party camp followers for years. The UK political class has become a glove puppet operated from Europe..

      • bluedog

        One can’t afford to be too high-minded in the quest for power, danny. But completely agree that there is a serious shortage of political talent. As this writer keeps saying, Boris wins elections. In fact, he’s never lost one, and he’s showing every sign of growing up and not playing the clown. More important, Boris retains an offensive spirit, and it is quite obvious that Mrs May is in a defeatist mood and tired of the top job, already. Other pretenders like Mogg are simply not credible and do not have the broad appeal that Boris has won. Mogg has many strengths but comes under the heading of ‘pale and interesting’. Boris has enormous recognition, everyone knows who he is, and that’s a major positive.

        • Dreadnaught

          It says much for the paucity of credible/able politicians when Johnson and Mogg, even Corbyn are the only ones that attract the public’s attention.

        • Maalaistollo

          Self-promotion is an inevitable tool of the politician’s trade. If it is accepted that both BJ and JRM are, in different ways, engaged in that activity, the choice needs to be made on the basis of other criteria, eg honesty and trustworthiness. Those characteristics appear evident in only one of them. If an ‘offensive spirit’ is what is required, why isn’t dear old Dennis Skinner the PM?

          • bluedog

            Politicians tend to dissemble and the higher the office, the greater the tendency.There is no doubt that JRM has a first class mind and an unblemished record for integrity. But then his political life to date has been without the complication of executive responsibility. Make him a minister and put him in front of a good interviewer and one might see something different.

        • dannybhoy

          We shall see. Being a good leader is not about having all the answers, but knowing where to get the answers. It’s about appreciating the zeal of the prophet and the clear thinking of the pragmatist. Even though I believe in equality I sometimes think in our desire to afford the same opportunities to all, we have erased the value of the individual, the loner, the thinker. We prefer ‘corporate man’.
          I seem to remember that in ancient days the Greek city states when threatened by a formidable foe would temporarily relinquish their independent individuality and elect the very best warrior strategist as their leader and unite under him..
          Perhaps (for a time) we need to return to that philosophy..?
          Certainly it seems to me that we human beings go through cycles.of priority. When young we are dependent, when physically mature we seek a mate, in our twilight years we seek familiarity and security.
          Where would I be without my wonderful wife? ;0)

          • bluedog

            Not sure to whom you lead, you carefully avoid being specific.

          • dannybhoy

            Sorry it was just a generalisation, following on from how leaders emerge in a modern democratic society. JRM for instance is perhaps seen as more of a novelty than a potential leader. The same with Boris. He grabbed people’s attention because of his appearance, his outspokenness and his reputation as both ‘a brain’ and a bit of a rogue where the ladies are concerned..
            However, politically he failed to live up to expectations and it’s “Goodbye Boris.”

          • bluedog

            The central issue is the need to play for time until Corbyn is too old to lead Labour in an election. He’s currently 68 and will be 73 if the government survives until the next election is due. If elected in 2022, he would be 78 at the end of the electoral term five years later. One would hope that Labour would not try to promote a leader that old. This writer thought May was doing the right thing by calling an election to secure her own mandate. Her ratings were extremely high at the time but she made two fatal mistakes; a long campaign and thus exposure to risk, and her own inertia and failure to engage. Now TM has made another fatal error in deferring Brexit for two years in such a way that Britain is excluded from EU decision making but bears the full cost of all EU diktats. It’s hard to believe that a professional politician could be so inept. It is also hard to believe that she will survive as Conservative leader. So, who’s next? Your call.

  • Chefofsinners

    Thank you, dear lady. Jihadis have certainly added new vistas of meaning to the term ‘bucket list’.
    One is reminded of St Thomas a Bucket, slain in his own cathedral. Of course nowadays this sort of behaviour is welcomed in our churches. Whilst perusing the pages of Exchange and Martyr this week, I noticed the following advertisement: Fine Gothic cathedral available for desecration. Ideal venue for destroying the lives of righteous men. No Job too big, no Job too small.

  • dannybhoy

    “Mrs. Dismay’s later speech to the same assembly showed her for what she is – a globalist, neo-Marxist incompetent who twitters on about justice and freedom whilst suppressing liberty at home; a vicar’s daughter who is wet with desire for the Saracen and more concerned with refugees than the indigenous Briton. Shariah May is no conservative: she will scupper Brexit and pledge billions of pounds to the Zollverein even after we have left. That which calls itself The Conservative Party is but a chimera – it wears a blue burkha to disguise the traitors hiding within its folds. It is like the Norwegian Blue Parrot, having fallen from the perch of sanity long ago. It is dead.”

    Excellent Mrs Proudie!
    The British Tory Party has become the EU Toadie Party.

  • len

    Are we coming out of the EU?…Maybe…Maybe not…
    You put your left leg in, your left leg out,in out, in out, you shake it all about, etc.

    • Cressida de Nova

      Len – calm down. Please sit quietly and keep your legs together. This is not the time for self expression in wanton abandonment.

      • Chefofsinners

        You Catholics are so Puritanical.

  • Inspector General

    Breaking news, Mrs Proudie. There is a possibility that North Korea may have just blown up. If true, wouldn’t it be a simply wonderful end to an unpleasant time of late!

  • Inspector General

    Mrs Proudie. As Londoners face the choice of once again paying full whack for a taxi, or walking everywhere, your Inspector can reveal what in his opinion delivered a fatal blow to Uber…

    You see, there have been scores of complaints to various ‘representative organisations’ about Uber drivers taking a dim view to same sex goings on in the back of their vehicles. For that reason, the sentence had to be death. May God have mercy on the new jobless’ job prospects…

    • Anton

      TfL’s withdrawal of Uber’s permit for London is a disgrace. Vested interests have succeeded in keeping the cost of cabs high for everybody. It is absurd in the satnav to see men driving round on mopeds learning ‘the knowledge’ of London’s streets. The dam will eventually burst and normal people will be able to afford a cab back home after a good night out.

      • Chefofsinners

        The concern being whether they will actually arrive home with body, wallet and virgo intacta, given the Uber approach to background checks.

        • Anton

          Don’t use them then. Simple.

          You might be underestimating Uber’s own safeguards, though.

          • Chefofsinners

            That leads into a broader discussion about how much market regulation is desirable. Since taxis often serve people disadvantaged by illness, disability, tiredness, aloneness, inebriation, being foreign, etc. the sector is widely considered to need some regulation.

          • Anton

            Widely considered by taxi drivers. As I said, Uber has good safeguards: the cab registration number is verified by the customer, and online feedback can be given. Fear of being caught and punished is the main deterrent to crime and here the fear factor is high.

          • Manfarang

            Especially those operating from the airports run by Dick Turpin & Co.

          • Chefofsinners

            There is a delivery firm run by two blokes called Daniel and Stanley.
            “Stan Dan Deliver.”

        • Inspector General

          Don’t think there’s much of a problem there. The drivers tend to be family men after a regular income as they all have several Mohameds at home that need feeding. Oh, and those other things they don’t particularly want but are stuck with, daughters…

        • carl jacobs

          If Uber was perceived to be unsafe, people wouldn’t use it. The problem is that Uber is seen by politicians as insufficiently “socially responsible”. It’s not about safety. It’s about the business model. Politicians want employers who take responsibility for (and can be held to account for) employees. Uber’s business model depends on never establishing that connection with its drivers.

          This will be humorous if Uber is ever actually banned. Lots of left wing Londoners would suddenly find it difficult and expensive to get around. Nothing is more hilarious than a Progressive who has to actually live with the consequences of his ideology.

          • Chefofsinners

            “If Uber was perceived to be unsafe, people wouldn’t use it.”
            The problem being that if the government regulators approve Uber, then it is likely to be perceived as safe.

          • carl jacobs

            People don’t need government regulators to make that decision. They will make it from experience. If Uber was unsafe it would have already ceased to exist.

          • Chefofsinners

            Like lions. Totally safe, ’cause they still exist.
            No, you make two of the basic assumptions of economic modelling: i) perfect knowledge. ii) rational consumers. The real world is not so cut and dried. People are stupid, people get drunk, they take risks, they believe advertising, they fail to assimilate all available information and they make poor decisions. Predatory lions in Uber clothing are prowling and pick off the weakest.

          • carl jacobs

            Lions don’t depend upon a public perception of safety to keep people using their services. And, no, I am not assuming either perfect knowledge or rational actors. I would not fly on Ethiopian Airlines? Do I have perfect knowledge of EAL? No. I simply assume a third world country can’t maintain a safe airline. Am I therefore being rational? You tell me.

            Word of mouth would kill Uber dead. One bad experience would quickly be communicated and others would hear of it. People would hesitate to call. It wouldn’t take too many repeats of that circumstance for people to get an exaggerated view of the risk. Then they wouldn’t just hesitate. They would stop calling. This would be an irrational response to imperfect information but it would be none the less fatal.

          • Chefofsinners

            You talk in hypothetical terms. “One bad experience would kill Uber dead”. There is no need. We can test your assertions in the real world.
            At this link http://www.whosdrivingyou.org/rideshare-incidents there is a list of around 20 deaths, 50 assaults, 100 sexual assaults, 15 kidnappings and a raft of other crimes by Uber drivers. But the company has not ceased to exist.

          • Anton

            Relative to how many passenger-miles, and what are the equivalent stats per passenger-mile for radiocabs and kerb-hail cabs?

          • Chefofsinners

            I don’t know. Neither do you. Maybe we could have some kind of government regulator who could specialise in knowing all the facts, collating and assimilating them and making an impartial decision. And getting criticised by those who don’t know all the facts.

          • Anton

            If you can’t give those comparative stats then you have made no point.

            We already have too many damn government regulators. That’s my point.

          • Chefofsinners

            The point was a rebuttal of Carl’s assertion about the impact of incidents with Uber drivers.

            If you don’t know the facts, you need someone who does. That’s why there are government regulators.

          • Anton

            No. The free market needs no regulators and Carl has explained in detail how quickly word would spread if Uber really were dangerous, and it would nosedive.

            The reason there are are government regulators is because it is a milch cow for government. Just another tax, coming on top of already artificially high taxi rates, to hammer the “poor bloody infantry” ie the working poor.

          • Chefofsinners

            “The free market needs no regulators”? Really? What of Drugs, prostitution, guns, and contract killings? Doctors who botch surgery, supermarkets that sell horse meat as beef, and every snakeoil salesman in your caveat emptor world? The market will cope? People will eventually stop buying this stuff once word gets around, and the devil take those who die in the meantime.

          • Anton

            I am all in favour of a free market in drugs. Legalise the lot and tax them to the hilt. That’s what’s done with fags and whisky and the present diversion of a huge amount of police time to drug law enforcement isn’t working and is a huge waste of resources.

            Most things are best coped with by a “avoid if once bitten” free market strategy. If you want protection in something crucial eg buying a house, hire a lawyer – just as people do. Murder is of course illegal, and negligence should be sueable.

            Nanny State pretty soon turns into Big Brother.

          • Chefofsinners

            Anarchy in the UK.
            How did those lyrics go again?

          • Anton

            Ask Gilbert and Sullivan. The law gave people that much freedom in their day. Was Victorian Britain anarchistic?

          • Chefofsinners

            I wasn’t there. Maybe the Inspector could enlighten? By all accounts it was a Godless, lawless place where those who had power to protect generally abused that power.

          • Anton

            Whereas today…

          • Chefofsinners

            Chimney sweeps are REALLY expensive. Oh for the unregulated Victorian market in child labour!

          • Anton

            Try using the cat.

          • Sarky

            Doesnt work though does it. Fags are highly taxed, therefore most fags smoked are smuggled in and free from tax. Same will happen with drugs.

          • Anton

            So?

          • Sarky

            You still don’t have control. You just disguise the problem.

          • Anton

            What problem? People killing themselves is not a problem of mine. OK, the State loses the tax revenue, but the main point is that the police aren’t half-killing themselves doing something futile.

          • Sarky

            People killing themselves is not a problem of mine.

            Is that how compassionate christianity works?? Glad I’m an atheist.

          • Anton

            God so values human freedom of choice of the individual that he has let the world get into the shit state it now is. This will not be the case indefinitely, but I seek to match his attitude to freedom in regard to what the law should be. At the individual level I hope I could talk someone down off a high ledge rather than say “Go ahead, jump!”. Pl;ease don’t confuse the individual and collective levels. I can love someone; the State can’t. Preserve me from the compassion of the State!

          • carl jacobs

            Good grief, sarky. If we try to prevent people from hurting themselves you shout “Quit imposing your morality on others.” If we leave others to act on their autonomy (as you demand) you say “This is how compassionate Christianity works.” Or are you really saying “We act how we want and you help clean up the mess. Unconditionally and without judgment of course. And don’t be speaking any of that “God” shit while you do it. That isn’t what you are here to do.”

            Drug addiction is from your culture and your worldview, sarky. Not mine. There is no clearer sign of the degeneracy of the West than its wholesale flight into alternate reality through drugs. The bored and the despairing seek what they cannot find in life through chemical alteration and turn their minds into baked alaska in the process. And what answers do you have? You can’t even prove that your own life has meaning. How can you tell them that their quest isn’t ultimately more meaningful than simply living life in the barren hopeless dead universe that you presume you inhabit?

          • carl jacobs

            You know, Anton, there is a curious campaign going on in the more progressive parts of the United States call “Ban the Box”. The box in question is the box on a job application that asks the applicant if he has ever been convicted of a felony. Employers routinely use that question to screen ex-cons from job interviews. The campaign seeks to force businesses to defer asking that question until after an interview has been granted. The business would then be required to publicly explain to the unsuccessful applicant how the crime he committed might directly impact the job being offered, and the business could be sued for its answer. The rationale is obvious. It’s hard for ex-cons to find employment. The state is seeking to shift the burden off itself and onto businesses. The aggregate is served by helping ex-cons get jobs and not re-offend. But certain particular employers will pay the price when a particular ex-con reacts according to form.

            Which is why I say it is curious. One the one hand, you have regulators saying passengers must be protected during the hiring process from drivers with dangerous history. On the other hand, you have regulators saying don’t consider the dangerous history of felons so they can find employment. It all depends upon whose parochial interest is being served. Regulation isn’t done exclusively in the public interest. It is done based upon a particular political perspective of the public interest. As in “We don’t like Uber because it encourages contingent employment, and we don’t like screening felons because then the state has to pick up the tab when they can’t find work.”

          • Anton

            The usual hypocrisy!

            The British government simply wants revenue by selling monopolies, just as James I and Charles I did, and it then has to appoint a regulator to go with each industry it regulates.

            It is truly depressing how many people here seem to think that “unregulated” is virtually synonymous with “illegal”. There is no point in Brexit if Brits are going to think like that.

          • carl jacobs

            Chef

            Your examples are from all over the world. They would need to be concentrated in a given area and then they would kill Uber in that area. No one in (say) the US cares about crimes that happens in (say) Singapore. But if you get 20 murders, 50 assaults, and 100 sexual assaults in (say) Louisville Kentucky, Uber will die in Louisville Ky. And people in similar areas would start looking askance at the service.

            People expect a certain level of crime just as they expect a certain level of aircraft accidents. Isolated accidents won’t sink the airlines and isolated crimes won’t sink Uber. But a discernable criminal pattern in an area would. It would mean potential customers are repeatedly hearing bad information about the service they might potentially use.

          • Chefofsinners

            The problem with your Louisville argument being that dead people are difficult to resurrect, so a degree of anticipation is advisable. Maybe a regulator, who can collate information from across the world where the same system has run into problems, and insist that the company changes its approach before a problem occurs here.

          • carl jacobs

            I’m not opposed to such regulation. What you say makes sense. Nonetheless, I see no latent safety problem with Uber and neither does the market. That doesn’t mean such a problem couldn’t emerge. Regulation shouldn’t be used to kill unwelcome competition for a favored industry – or to kill an ideologically disfavored business model.

          • Chefofsinners

            Regulation’s function is to operate when the market does not see a problem. You cannot see a problem either, but apparently the regulator can. Probably, the regulator has more information than you. It will all be tested in court soon enough. I don’t see why anyone is complaining.

          • carl jacobs

            When it comes to personal safety being violated by assault, the market is far more sensitive than any regulator could hope to be. Your case is best made by things like vehicle safety, and insurance, and driving record.

          • Chefofsinners

            Evidently the market is not more sensitive than the regulator since many violent crimes have been perpetrated by Uber drivers abroad. The regulator has responded to them because the market has not.

          • carl jacobs

            Violent crimes in Brazil do not provide any useful information about the potential for violent crimes in the UK. It’s a totally different context. To regulate on that basis is to reveal the presence of a hidden ideological agenda.

          • Chefofsinners

            As you yourself said, the examples come from all over the world. If we were on another planet then your argument might apply.

          • Anton

            That’s a loooooooong taxi ride!

          • CliveM

            There is something surreal about this discussion, satanic uber versus angelic black cab. See attached for a little context, and would people stop miss applying unregulated!!

            https://www.google.co.uk/amp/s/www.standard.co.uk/news/crime/over-400-london-cab-drivers-charged-with-crimes-last-year-a3226396.html%3famp

          • carl jacobs

            Seriously? You think you should set policies in the UK based upon events in Rio? Well, you better start arming your police then. Because you’ve got bigger problems than Uber drivers to address.

          • Sarky

            The taxi drivers involved in the Rotheram grooming gangs weren’t uber drivers.
            There are scum everywhere, the law of averages is that some will be uber drivers.

      • layreader

        There are plenty of alternatives to black cabs; they used to be called minicabs. Uber’s only contribution to London’s transport was to monopolise the minicab market, and, like all monopolies, it must ultimately fail.

        • Anton

          That’s untrue. The problem with a minicab is that you seldom know the number of the local company and they are often committed for the next hour. You could generally and easily call up an Uber within minutes.

          • carl jacobs

            And that’s the magic. Uber could never afford to put enough vehicles on the streets to achieve that response time if it had to own the vehicles. Instead it facilitates private individuals who set their own hours and use their own vehicles. They go where the calls are and respond to the market. The fleet can expand or contract to market forces without Uber involvement.

            It’s a brilliant and effective model that allows a taxi service to closely emulate all the advantages of a private car. But it does not lend itself easily to full time employment with benefits. Hense Uber is “socially irresponsible”.

          • dannybhoy

            It helps clog up already congested roads, it is difficult to ascertain roadworthiness, insurance, and trustworthiness/accountability of the driver.
            Most complaints are about Uber taxis not black cabs.
            There are buses..

          • carl jacobs

            Yes, there are busses. Why do people prefer cars? Because cars go where you want when you want. Busses don’t. If you ride a bus, you generally have to hoof the last quarter mile of the journey yourself. How vulnerable are you to attack if you are walking alone in the dark from the bus stop? Do you attribute this vulnerability to busses? You should. It is inherent in the mode of transportation.

            I happen to ride a bus to work periodically. If I drive I will spend 30 minutes per day in transit. If I take the bus that time increases to 2 hours. How much value should I attach to that extra 90 minutes?

            In fact, Uber will reduce congestion like any other taxi service because one Uber driver will account for multiple trips. Would you also complain about congestion if the density of black cabs equaled that of Uber? I think that there would be no complaint – except the black cabs could never afford it. Uber provides a level of service that can companies cannot match. That is why they see Uber as such a threat.

            And here is an exercise for the reader, danny. Who should be allowed to drive on “congested streets” and why? Do you have some test of social responsibility that justifies using a car or are you simply hostile to personal transportation? You seem to have an idyllic image where the many inconvenience themselves so the few righteous can drive.

            People use Uber because they like Uber. You seem to be saying “Yes but they shouldn’t like it. So they must be prevented from using it. Yes it will be more inconvenient and expensive but …tough. They can ride the bus.” If the choice isn’t immoral who are you to restrict it?

          • Anton

            This is a weird subthread, Carl. I expect people in Industry ‘A’ to lobby the authorities for protection for Industry ‘A’. That’s inevitable. But in an era in which we are nearly all producers of one thing and consumers of many it is very strange to find people advocating protectionism for industries of which they are themselves consumers. Socialism truly does rot the mind.

          • carl jacobs

            People are afraid of the contingent economy, and that is what Uber represents. I am also surprised at the frequent references to the race of the driver on this thread.

          • Mrs Proudie of Barchester

            I think it is more to do with the worrying times we live in, dear Carl. Most Brits are pretty tolerant, but terrorist attacks in London and Manchester, and the way mass immigration is changing the nature and culture of some of our cities, means that ordinary decent folk are more worried…and yes, more frightened, than they used to be.

          • betteroffoutofit

            That’s because if you’re in a taxi-line, and if you wait for a British-driven cab to turn up . . . forget it. It’s not going to happen.
            Last time I kept giving up my place to others in line — I got told off by everybody anyway. Guess what, they said I’d be reported for ‘racism.’

            So then I rented a car – and the mozzie boy who took me to my rental harrassed me as I opened the door to take my seat.

            You Americans really don’t know what it’s like here — or what it used to be like prior to the invasion.

          • Anton

            This too is anecdotal, but I had a great chat about cricket with my most recent Muslim taxi driver.

          • Sarky

            The last one i had, was excited to show me his invite to the queens garden party because of his charity work. Really nice bloke!!!

          • Sarky

            Really?? Its a right wing christian blog.
            Theres an innate fear of anyone who doesnt look like Mrs Proudie or her male equivalent.

          • Anton

            I’d thought it was rightwing until this subthread.

            The concern expressed is not about race but religion, actually; and it doesn’t worry me in regard to Uber anyway (see my comment about chatting cricket).

          • Sarky

            See my similar comment that follows.

          • carl jacobs

            You are stereotyping. Besides there aren’t enough Christians left in Europe to account for the growing existential fear in Europe.

          • dannybhoy

            “Would you also complain about congestion if the density of black cabs equaled that of Uber? ”
            No, you surely know Carl, that the British Isles is far smaller than the USA. You also know that any road however wide can only hold so many vehicles.
            I would rather see more environmentally friendly public transport vehicles in our UK major cities with equally environmentally friendly and carefully regulated private taxis for those in a hurry.
            Anyway whilst I believe in capitalism, I do think it needs to be regulated or capped, rather than given free rein.
            I am an idealist, but not an idyllist.
            My fear is that capitalism and democracy will be used by our enemies to destroy us.

          • carl jacobs

            You really didn’t answer any of my points. You just confirmed by implication that what I said about your position is true. If you really want to help the environment then force your population into high-density high-rise tenements and make them walk everywhere. Protect the green space. Eliminate smog completely. It will be so healthy.

            Too far to walk you say? Well then … Electric street cars! They can queue for hours in the outdoors breathing air with no smog. Healthy!

            And there is a model already. That’s what the Soviets did.

          • dannybhoy

            “Why do people prefer cars? Because cars go where you want when you want. ”
            Cars – private cars – are rather different to minicabs or uber taxis..
            “How vulnerable are you to attack if you are walking alone in the dark from the bus stop? ”
            That’s a law and order issue Carl. Naughty people..
            How many rape/robbery cases have been attributed to buses?

          • carl jacobs

            Cars – private cars – are rather different to minicabs or uber taxis.

            Uber is about as close as a transit system can come to a private car. It works because there is a high probability that an Uber driver is just a few minutes away when you call. That solves the frequency problem inherent in transit. It then goes directly to your destination. That’s why people like it and use it. It mimics a private car so much better than other systems. The cab companies simply cannot provide the vehicle density to solve that frequency problem.

            That’s a law and order issue Carl.

            An attack by an Uber driver is also a law and order issue.

            How many rape/robbery cases have been attributed to buses?

            I guess it depends on your method of attribution. If someone is attacked while he is walking from the bus stop to his home, is that the problem of the bus or not? Would he have been in a position to be attacked except for his use of the bus? What if he had driven straight to his home?

          • dannybhoy

            It’s people who attack us Carl, not inanimate objects. I and my wife feel safe where we live because we know most of the folk in our community . Venture further out to where folk of mixed ethnicity, awareness levels go up, and in areas where the majority are Muslim/Caribbean/ Somalian the stress levels go even higher.
            A black cab driver is registered, is traceable.

          • carl jacobs

            So here what I heard you just say. You are concerned that Uber will kill off the cab companies and then your only option will be Uber cars driven by Muslim immigrants. This isn’t about congestion or the environment or work rules or exploitation. It’s about your fear of immigrants.

            Am I correct? Because it has surprised me how quickly the race of the driver entered this discussion.

          • dannybhoy

            That’s because most Uber drivers are foreign. That’s because we have attacks on people and we have terrorist attacks.
            It might be acceptable to some as a necessary component of ‘freedom ‘ but I prefer feeling safe and comfortable in my own country.

          • Anton

            Then stick to blackcabs. But don’t try to stop those who wish using Uber. Apart from anything else, the competition would drive down the price for you when you use your next blackcab.

          • carl jacobs

            When you call an Uber driver, you get displayed on your phone his name, his picture, a description of his car, and his license plate.

          • dannybhoy

            I didn’t know that, not having used, or ever intending to use Uber. A few years ago my wife and her sister went for their annual jaunt to the Big Smoke, and took an Uber taxi from the station to their hotel. (No apps involved, he was just touting for business).
            Anyway his English was very poor and he kept asking the girls for the postcode -which they didn’t have, only the name of the hotel.
            He stopped the car in the middle of a busy road and went off to ask people where this place was..
            Of course that’s a one off, but better to have a black cab driver who knows the city and is known by other drivers and of course the police..

          • carl jacobs

            took an Uber taxi from the station to their hotel. (No apps involved, he was just touting for business).

            So he wasn’t an Uber driver then. He was a private taxi. The Uber driver also has an app on his phone in his car. It’s typically mounted on his dashboard. He needs to know where to go to get you. He needs to know how to get you where you want to go. The app directs him with GPS. Uber drivers don’t need to ask for directions. You don’t even exchange money with an Uber driver. The app tells him that you have paid. You just get out of the car and leave.

            Honestly, danny, what you are communicating is that you don’y know much about Uber at all.

          • dannybhoy

            I know they are clogging up London roads, I know what that US magazine says about them, and I know they are stealing business from our own trained and accountable black cab drivers, who are mostly London born and bred.

            Just as your POTUS promotes American interests (and I agree with him), so I want to see UK interests put first. I don’t want globalisation, I like national individuality, not corporate conformity.
            I totally dislike the arrogant and bullying attitudes of companies like Google, Amazon, Starbucks and the like, who avoid paying their legitimate taxes and exploit human beings…

          • Anton

            What you forget is that people want Uber because it is cheaper and because they can get an Uber more easily. Why are you taking the side of a small number of self-interested blackcab drivers against what is currently 700,0000 people who have signed a petition against the delicensing of Uber at change.org, a number rising by an unprecdented 100,000 every 150 minutes?

          • dannybhoy

            “Why are you taking the side of a small number of self-interested blackcab drivers against what is currently 700,0000 people who have signed a petition against the delicensing of Uber at change.org, a number rising by an unprecdented 100,000 every 150 minutes?”

            You surprise me Anton.
            Really.
            Why am I taking the side of a small number of self-interested blackcab drivers?
            Because I don’t like Uber.
            Everyone’s ‘self interested’ Anton. Every decision a human being makes is self interested. It’s called self preservation.
            I like black cabs, – even red black cabs. They are as much a part of London as red buses, policemen with helmets etc etc.
            Why would we want to see more vehicles clogging up London’s roads?
            But listen, go ahead and use your blinkin’ Uber taxi. It’s your right; at least up until the end of September..
            And it’s my right to support black cabs as a traditional part of London.

          • Anton

            Yes, it’s your right to be ripped off.

          • IrishNeanderthal

            There’s a lot more space in Russia.

            And, for a bit of fresh air, even if not that relevant to urban transport, why not enjoy this?

            FLASHMOB: Citizens from the Russian Far East city Blagoveschensk singing Ukrainian song

          • dannybhoy

            Am I going mad here?
            “People use Uber because they like Uber. You seem to be saying “Yes but they shouldn’t like it. So they must be prevented from using it. Yes it will be more inconvenient and expensive but …tough. They can ride the bus.” If the choice isn’t immoral who are you to restrict it?”
            My argument is why I repeat I, don’t like it and why I,repeat I, am concerned about it.

          • Linus

            What, you’re so overweight you can’t even walk a quarter of a mile and need a car to transport you from door to door?

            It’s the American business model that’s heading for extinction. It’s literally going to eat itself to death.

          • Anton

            Exactly; it gives a much closer match of supply and demand.

      • dannybhoy

        The True Cost of Your Uber Ride Is Much Higher Than You Think
        https://motherboard.vice.com/en_us/article/9a3vye/uber-true-cost-uh-oh

        I don’t like Uber.
        For the same reason I never ever would use cheap hand carwashes.
        They all seem to be foreigners, and I suspect exploitation and discrimination..
        There are far too many alleged attacks or abuses linked with Uber taxis.
        They add to road congestion.
        There is some sort of scandal involving buying proper private taxi insurance and then switching to private car insurance.
        I suspect that Uber undermines basic law and order. i.e. flouting rules and laws in the name of free enterprise.
        I don’t believe in unbridled capitalism.
        I accept that black taxis are expensive and should be investigated, but at least you know the driver is registered, checked and the taxi is compartmentalised, keeping you and the driver separate.

        • Anton

          Fine. Stick to black cabs. This is not about who prefers which type of taxi, however, but about FREEDOM OF CHOICE to use Uber or not. Carl gets it (below). Don’t you?

          • dannybhoy

            What does freedom of choice mean? Does it mean that as long as it’s cheap why worry about personal safety, or regulation in terms of vehicle road worthiness, insurance and accountability?
            A civilisation is built on freedom of choice???

          • Anton

            If you’d rather live in a place where there is little freedom of choice, I can name plenty of countries.

            It will have an MoT and be insured like any motor vehicle on the road today, and if you are worried about personal safety despite the Uber driver accountability which I’ve explained below then DON’T USE UBER. But let others.

          • dannybhoy

            The age of unregulated free enterprise is over. Our world is too crowded, and we understand how much human activity impacts on our environment, and how open borders also opens us up to potential attacks.
            Tell me, are you really happy that all handwash car outlets are run by Eastern Europeans, and no native British get a look in? Are you happy that there is known exploitation going on, with employees being forced to work long hours with low pay and miserable conditions?
            Are you not bothered that almost anyone can be an Uber driver?
            As a citizen and a Christian I most certainly am.

          • Anton

            So Uber now wrecks the environment and facilitates terrorism? I’d say you have done your best to change the subject, but I’m not falling for it.

            The age of unregulated free enterprise might indeed be over in which case we shall all be the poorer for it. Back to mediaeval Guilds who keep all nonmembers from practising their trades, what?

            Brits don’t want to handwash cars for money, and don’t have to while benefits are so lavish. Simple solution: Cut benefits.

          • dannybhoy

            “So Uber now wrecks the environment and facilitates terrorism? ”
            I didn’t say it wrecks the environment (you sound slightly hysterical).
            But yes, it does bother me that so many Uber drivers, minicab drivers are Muslims.
            I refer you to this..
            http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-3678547/Taxi-driver-pleads-guilty-killing-Glasgow-shopkeeper-Asad-Shah-wished-Christian-customers-happy-Easter.html

            https://www.thesun.co.uk/news/1577830/taxi-driver-who-laughed-and-laughed-as-he-stabbed-another-muslim-to-death-for-disrespecting-the-prophet-muhammed-is-jailed-for-life/
            There was also a tv programme one or two years ago which documented the routes taken by ethnic and non ethnic British taxi drivers across a major British city..
            I haven’t found it yet, but perhaps others will remember it?

          • Anton

            I repeat: If you don’t like Uber, don’t use it. But who are you to tell others that they can’t?

          • dannybhoy

            Where did I say they can’t?
            I said I don’t like Uber and gave my reasons.

          • Anton

            You support the withdrawal of Uber’s license, which is equivalent. I repeat: If you don’t like Uber, don’t use it. Nobody is forcing you to. But let others use it if they want to spend less.

          • dannybhoy

            But the more traffic there is the more pollution. The more vehicles the more impediments re emergency vehicles. I believe public transport of any kind should be regulated and carefully monitored.

          • Anton

            Nonsense. The more Uber the fewer private cars on the road in regard to many journeys, as Carl has explained. Why are you picking on Uber? If there is too much traffic then why not pick on the private motorist? Because it could be you, maybe?

          • Brits do hand wash cars for a living I know plenty of them. They don’t work in gangs from a disused old carwash alley in a Shell or the like forecourt. Instead they pop in to see people at work to see who wants a car clean. They have all the equipment for a full wash and valet and payment is when the job is done. They are good so get repeat business.

          • dannybhoy

            You live n a large town or city Marie?
            The only ones I see are Eastern European and I will not use them. If they are indeed British I would use them.

          • Mrs Proudie of Barchester

            Oh I don’t know, the Polish fellows who give my barouche a good rubbing down are most efficient and pleasant.

          • dannybhoy

            Polish always gives a better finish to a vigorous rubbing down…

          • CliveM

            The era of unregulated free enterprise ended about the regency era. We haven’t enjoyed it for a long time and no one is advocating it.

          • dannybhoy

            Anton is.

          • CliveM

            is he? Or is he saying lightly regulated?

          • Anton

            It is all about what is regulated. Some things should be, some shouldn’t. If one man wants to get paid by another to drive him from A to B then I don’t think it is anybody else’s business.

          • CliveM

            But Uber is regulated in that it has to comply to certain rules and regulations.

            The point I’m making is the left (not you DB :0) )tends to witter on about neo liberalism or claim lack of regulation when none of this is true. All business activity is subject to some regulation, it’s the level that’s being debated.

            If Uber was not subject to regulation, why would it need a licence?

            If we accept the idea that Uber is unregulated, we start believing the lies that Corbyn and co are spouting.

          • Anton

            Indeed; I don’t see why anybody should need a license to run taxis in cities. But at present they do, and I am complaining that Uber has just lost its license and the result will be that a cheaper service has been forced out by a vested interest that charges more and that cozied up to the authorities.

          • dannybhoy

            No, he’s arguing for freedom of choice.

          • bluedog

            danny, are you against airbnb too? The business model is identical to that of Uber, it’s completely unregulated and some of the landlords (gasp) maybe Eastern Europeans or other non-native British. Is it an environmental threat for people to let out empty bedrooms for profit? Or should these empty bedrooms be re-allocated by the state to BME migrants and refugees?

          • dannybhoy

            What’s airbnb?
            It’s certainly not wrong to rent out a spare room; people have been doing it for centuries. It’s called taking in a lodger.
            We were btl landlords for a few years, renting out a house.
            But that’s rather different to clogging up the roads and making travel in big cities more difficult and unhealthy.

          • bluedog

            Is that a serious question? If so, suggest you try google.

          • dannybhoy

            ‘Course it’s a serious question. Why would you assume otherwise? I’m 71. I grew up in an era where we had draughty sash windows, frost on the inside of the windows during winter, no ‘fridge, no telephone, no central heating, and most people of my clarss went to work by foot or if they were really posh, on a bike.
            I belong to a generation when we had Army displays and Navy Days, and there were more than three boats in the docks. I grew up when we had no television and it cost six old pence and a penny ha’penny bus ride to go to a children’s Saturday morning matinee at a local cinema…

          • bluedog

            Those were the days!

          • Anton

            Now that you have presumably found out what AirBnB is, do you think it too is immoral?

          • dannybhoy

            It seems like a good idea. Where would morality enter into it?

          • Anton

            Blue asked you if you disapproved of it too, since it is the same business model. Please reply to him now you know what it is!

          • Anton

            You ducked Carl’s question that followed his explanation of how Uber actually reduces road traffic.

          • You can’t compare Uber to the print industry. We don’t have infinite space for roads in cities to support every tom dick and harry that wants to setup a taxi firm. Uber are decidedly dodgy, they have no workers rights for their drivers, they flout the laws and don’t pay enough tax.

          • Chefofsinners

            Calm down everybody. I’ll share my chauffeur if it helps.

          • Anton

            I’ve never controlled a coach and four.

          • Chefofsinners

            You’ll be lucky to get a Boris bike in the current climate.

          • Anton

            Changing the subject to global warming?

          • Mrs Proudie of Barchester

            Not in the biblical sense, one hopes…

          • Anton

            They are casual labour and nobody is forcing them to work for Uber. They pay heavy taxes on the car and on petrol; how high do you think tax should damn well be?

          • Linus

            St. Anton the Pharisee’s mounting hysteria over the Uber ban makes me wonder if that’s what he does for a day job.

          • dannybhoy

            We are not communicating well here, Linus.
            Anton is an intelligent well educated professional man, so it is possible I have not made myself clear.
            I hesitate to say more..
            My loyalty is to my brothers and sisters in Christ rather than enemies of the faith…

          • Linus

            Pixtian physicists have a habit of being laughed out of their profession. Uber may be his only employment option.

            That’s pure speculation on my part, of course. But the strangled hysteria evident in his posts on the subject of Uber gives rise to suspicion. In my mind at least. You may venture to believe what you will.

            And too damned right I’m an enemy of your faith. Just as the people who believe in it are enemies of my community.

          • dannybhoy

            You are so wrong..
            “Just as the people who believe in it are enemies of my community.”
            I don’t hate gays. Okay as a heterosexual male I cannot identify with the lifestyle, and as a Christian I know the Bible condemns homosexual practices; but I don’t hate anybody. I would happily be friends with a gay person, without condoning the lifestyle. We are more than our sexuality.

          • Mrs Proudie of Barchester

            Well said, dear dannybhoy…well said

          • Linus

            You don’t want to be seen to hate gay people, because Pixtians are supposed to love not hate. But your beliefs about us equate to hate because they hold our feelings and attractions to be inferior to your feelings and attractions, and evil if acted upon, or imagined, even though no harmful consequences ensue for anyone.

            That’s as good a definition of hatred as I can think of. Willingly inflicting suffering on people who do you and nobody else any harm because you don’t like who they are.

            This makes you very much the enemy of the LGBT community. I hope for their sake that you don’t have any gay friends. I would advise any gay person to keep well away from you. Your aim is to persuade us to make a living sacrifice of ourselves to your beliefs and suffer for your pleasure. Those are not the actions of a friend.

          • dannybhoy

            For Goodness sake Linus, get real, get in the real world. I have intervened and stuck up for people who for whatever reason were being bullied or abused, Sometimes it worked out well, sometimes I ended up regretting it, and sometimes I got pasted..
            You talk a load of crap Linus. You are entirely self absorbed and you risk eternal separation from God with your insults and blasphemies.
            Make no mistake, God wants all men to choose life and not death. That’s why the Lord Jesus Christ came into the world, to give His life so that we might be reconciled to God and have eternal life. You are as much a sinner as I am, and God offers you salvation.
            Stop with the crap, stop with the blasphemies and repent and live.

          • Linus

            The real world? That’s exactly where I live. You’re the ones who dream about invisible Sky Pixies and an imaginary fairyland called Pixidise. Not to mention the fearful Pixcinerator where Sky Pixie sends you when you’re naughty little boys and girls.

            The only blasphemies uttered around here are uttered by Pixtians. Not against any god or Sky Pixie: what doesn’t exist can’t be blasphemed. But against the reality in which we live. It just isn’t good enough for you, is it? You have to decorate it with gilded fancies and make-believe fairies. And above all, there has to be jeopardy to be avoided and a happy ending where you get everything you want, because the point of your existence is to get everything you want, isn’t it? The universe was created for your benefit.

            Mewling child, why don’t you try growing up?

          • Anton

            I am happy to confirm that I am not now and have never been an Uber driver.

          • Anton

            Did I expect you to be pro-freedom?

          • Chefofsinners

            It’s not hysteria.
            It’s ex-uber-Ants.

        • Merchantman

          Why not combine Uber technology with black cab training and standards. Everyone a winner.

          • dannybhoy

            I do believe I heard a black cab driver say the very same thing on LBC radio on Saturday morning. But as I understand from the first article I quoted ..
            “Investor reports reveal riders only pay 41 percent of the full cost of each ride, with investors footing the remaining 59 percent.”
            So perhaps the idea is that subsidies will lead to monopolies, and then who knows? Take a look at this article from ‘The Week’, a US publication..
            “How Uber could become a nightmarish monopoly”

            http://theweek.com/articles/675434/how-uber-could-become-nightmarish-monopoly

          • Anton

            If you deregulate entirely then as soon as Uber start overcharging, others will be free to undercut them.

            Although that 41/59 split is probably chosen to make a point; we all know that the cost of running a car can be small or large depending on what is taken into account and what isn’t – ask the taxman.

          • carl jacobs

            Because technology isn’t the “secret sause” of Uber. The critical idea was mobilizing private automobiles into part time taxis. There is simply no way a taxi company could put that many cabs on the road. It’s the low barrier to entry that allows the system to work and it’s precisely that low barrier that so threatens cab companies. Putting the Uber system into a traditional cab just means you have a better way to call a cab. You won’t have the density of drivers that allow so many people to get around.

      • I’d rather pay for a trained professional comfortable Black Cab with room for a suitcase than an Uber Taxi with a foreign driver relying on satnav who likes a grope at the end of the journey.

    • Mrs Proudie of Barchester

      There is always the Clapham Omnibus, dear inspector.

  • It is dead

    The death of the traditional, patriotic Conservative Party occurred some time before 1955. It was in that year that Churchill, talking to Ian Gilmour about immigration from the Caribbean and the Indian subcontinent, said: ‘I think it is the most important subject facing this country, but I cannot get any of my ministers to take any notice.’ Gilmour records the remark in his book, Inside Right.

    For the last 60 years, the Conservatives have represented themselves as pro-British while working to undermine Britain. The success of their deception owes much to their skill as liars but could not have been achieved without the gullibility of the electorate, for which the Conservatives daily give heartfelt thanks.

  • Father David

    I am delighted to learn that security arrangements are so strict and rigid in Barchester, you can’t be too careful these days. May you all live in peace. Having just see “Victoria and Abdul” on the Transatlantic cinematograph, I can thoroughly recommend the same as it depicts the special relationship between the old queen and her faithful Moslem servant.
    May I be permitted to enquire – do to have a Munshie Mrs Proudie? If not, I recommend that you acquire the services of one such forthwith as it will do wonders for Christo-Islamic relations.

    • Norman Yardy

      The only thing that will help Christo-Islamic relations is if they convert to Christianity.

    • HedgehogFive

      A rectifier is an electrical device that converts alternating current (AC), which periodically reverses direction, to direct current (DC), which flows in only one direction.

      That is how “Christo-Islamic relations” would evolve in such a situation.

  • Manfarang

    Mischief going on in Myanmar- Ata Ullah’s stated aim of defending the Rohingya has severely backfired. As one analyst said, “It is very difficult to give much credibility to the claim that the ARSA is trying to protect the rights of the people.”

    • IrishNeanderthal

      That’s sounds significant. Could you provide us with a link?

      • Manfarang
        • IrishNeanderthal

          What do you make of this article Why The West Should Do Nothing About The Rohingya Crisis In Myanmar?

          And might this next one have any bearing, albeit indirect, on the situation in Myanmar?

          https://www.steynonline.com/7428/it-still-the-demography-stupid
           

          • Anna

            The situation in Myanmar has been much distorted by the MSM which rarely interviews observers who might provide a more balanced perspective. Watch this video beginning at 2:08-

          • Manfarang

            Don’t forget the Tatmadaw (Burmese military) uses its notorious “four cuts” counter-insurgency strategy that aims to cut off food, funds, intelligence and popular support of armed resistance groups.

            The strategy was masterminded by former dictator General Ne Win, leader of the 1962 military coup and a trainee of the once occupying fascist Japanese Army. The four cuts strategy was inspired by Japan’s “three all”, or sanko seisaku, (“kill all, burn all, destroy all) tactics.

          • Anton

            That’s called a Ne Win Strategy.

          • Manfarang

            Fighting continues in northern Burma against the Kachin Christians, largely unreported.

          • Manfarang

            American envoy Patrick Murphy was in Myanmar from last Monday to Wednesday to assess the situation and while there he visited Rakhine and met with senior officials including Aung San Suu Kyi, and the military commander in chief, Min Aung Hlaing.
            Murphy has urged an end to violence and for humanitarian aid to be sent to the area.

    • Mrs Proudie of Barchester

      Who’s ARSA are we talking about?

      • Chefofsinners

        And why did it backfire?

        • Mrs Proudie of Barchester

          One shudders…

      • Manfarang

        I have no doubt in Barchester the Salvation Army is the one going round the pubs selling War Cry.

  • James60498 .

    That description of the Prime Minister is awesome.

    • Mrs Proudie of Barchester

      You ae most kind, dear James, but really the woman just gets my goat…

      • James60498 .

        Not at all Mrs P. I really don’t think I have ever actually used the word “awesome” before either in writing or verbally.

        It just seemed to be so appropriate. Up until then I really thought that the woman was indescribable, but some how you did it.

  • TropicalAnglican

    GREAT NEWS FOR ANTI-TRUMPERS!!

    Good News #1: Hillary Clinton has launched her latest book, “What Happened”, and it has straightaway rocketed to the top of Amazon’s bestseller chart! Remember, she won the popular vote, so sales of up to 65 million are expected! Ignore the ridiculous rumour that 3 million were dead at the time of voting!
    Also ignore this link if you do not wish to view the response from President Trump’s side:
    http://i.dailymail.co.uk/i/pix/2017/09/03/04/43DACF8900000578-0-image-a-16_1504410948124.jpg

    Good News #2: The Trump playbook is doing so badly that it is on sale now! Half-price special offer for Lab/LibDems/SNP/Wet Tory members only! Just 10 pounds plus 3.95 p&p. Grab a copy!
    Note: The Trump playbook was written with winners in mind. It therefore comes with a warning label on the back: “Will backfire on lefty/liberal losers. – BOOM! – Oh dear, too late was it?”

  • Norman Yardy

    Dear Mrs Proudie,
    ‘It deserves to lose the next election, even if we have to suffer the emetic of Corbyn Monoxide for a while. It might just bring the nation to its senses’:

    Which party can we Christian Brexiteers and others turn to find an earthly saviour to prevent the land becoming an Ottoman style atheist country? With a Muslim as London Mayor, how long before a PM? Twas a time when Jews were proscribed from Parliament. Might have been wiser to proscribe Muslims and their evangelical and violent approach to domination.

    True, Trump is a true patriot. Britain has not seen such leadership since the days of Churchill. (Except for dear Maggie). Even, so called ‘Christian’ MP’s turn turn coat when it suits to get a ministerial position.

    What was the norm has become the exceptional and what was exceptional and frowned on has now become the norm.

    Lord deliver us.

    • Father David

      Harrumph !!!!!

      • Mrs Proudie of Barchester

        An ex-snortation, dear Revd. David?

  • Bernard from Bucks

    “… notary’s certificate stating you have never purchased or read a Koran…”
    A gem to be copied and used over and over again, with of course our dear lady’s permission.

    • Bernard from Bucks

      Thank you Marie.
      One uptick here, is worth a hundred in Heaven. Bless you.

      • Bernard from Bucks

        Thank you also dear Inspector.

        • Inspector General

          One is stalking Linus, Bernard.

          • Mrs Proudie of Barchester

            There are other hobbies, dear Inspector….

          • dannybhoy

            Or did you meaN ‘Hotties’?

      • I’ll give you another one then.

    • Mrs Proudie of Barchester

      Permission granted, of course….

  • Bernard from Bucks

    “Shariah May is no conservative: she will scupper Brexit and pledge billions of pounds to the Zollverein even after we have left.”
    Meanwhile Mr McCoy told The Telegraph: “Breaking ranks is a cardinal sin in the EU.”
    I don’t seem to recognise this amongst any of the seven deadly sins.

  • len

    Brexit is becoming like ‘Jarndyce V Jarndyce’. Very taxing.

    • Mrs Proudie of Barchester

      Or Jaundice V Jaundice….very bilious

  • Mrs Proudie of Barchester

    I’m thrilled to have spent all week penning my thoughts on the doings of the world for my dear friends to spend time debating uber drivers. It’s good to know one provides a public service, or dare I say a ‘safe space,’ for motorised snowflake-ism. “Poop-poop” as the Toad once said, “Poop-poop”.

    • IanCad

      “….a globalist, neo-Marxist incompetent who twitters on about justice and freedom….
      Just one statement of fact that has me wishing for the return of the block and the gibbet as a curb on those treasonous politicians who care not a whit for our sovereignty.
      Don’t worry Mrs. P. Many read and appreciate and have no need to add anything.

    • carl jacobs

      It’s the Inspector’s fault. He started it. You should thwack him with a mixing spoon.

    • Anton

      Barchester Uber Alles

      • carl jacobs

        Hrmmm . I’m marginally inspired …

        Mrs Proudie uber alles
        Uber Alles on der blog.
        [Hummm hum humm humm hum hum] hobnobs.
        [Hum hum … ]

        Oh it’s hopeless. I can’t do this. Chef, you should apply your prodigious … umm … talent.

        • Anton

          Playing Haydn Seek?

        • Chefofsinners

          One hesitates to do requests, but as it’s you…

          Barchland, Barchland Bishop’s Palace!
          Uber alles on der blog.
          Mrs Proudie is our solace,
          Eloquenter than Rees-Mogg.
          Earl Grey, hobnobs, double entendres,
          She knows how to sour the Kraut.
          Yet one thing she never ponders:
          Is old Slope uber or ‘out’?

          • Mrs Proudie of Barchester

            Goodness! It does have a certain swing …

    • Chefofsinners

      I feel a referendum coming on: Uberexit.

      • If we stay longer than March 2019 we’ll be Uberexit.

    • It’s that Anton’s fault, he’s got a thing about Uber and unfettered capitalism.

      • Anton

        Victorians such as Mrs Proudie would have understood, but too many people have now been brainwashed by Nanny State and advocate the denial of freedom. Yes, I’ve got a thing about freedom.

        • Freedom for the drivers to stick their hands up ladies skirts, freedom to inappropriately hug women passengers, freedom not to speak English and to take you round the houses, to behave as they please. Look I’m all for freedom for new creations and ideas, but Uber is just the middleman taking a cut for providing access to the app that uses the internet. They’ve simply replaced the old fashioned taxi cab booking office. They have not and cannot top the Black Cab service and comfort. Do you know why the Black Cabs have high roofs, it’s because there is room for a gentleman’s top hat.

          • IanCad

            Next time I am invited to a function in the Capital, the attendance at which requires the wearing of a top hat, I shall hail a Black Cab. For lesser occasions a Uber
            ride will suit quite well.

          • Anton

            You don’t wear one on the way to church?

          • IanCad

            A little to ostentatious for church I believe, Anton. I confine my wearing of a topper to Royal Ascot and the occasional day with The Quorn.

          • Anton

            Not only high roofs but high prices and often scant availability. If you don’t want to use Uber then don’t use Uber. Nobody is forcing you to. If you want to pay more for less, Feel free. But grant freedom to others to make their money go further.

            Uber drivers get rated, you know, and you can see that rating when you call one up.

          • dannybhoy

            I’m with you Marie!

          • Anton

            The trouble is that about five iterations ago Carl asked you some hard questions and you have avoided them all.

        • Linus

          Freedom? But the whole point of Pixtianity is that you’re not free. You belong to Sky Pixie and if you don’t follow his rules, you’ll burn in the Pixcinerator for all eternity. That’s not freedom. It’s merely an illusion of freedom, because you’re only free to make one choice if you don’t want to writhe in agony for all time.

          Is that why freedom is such a fetish for you? You want to make the most of the little bit of it that you enjoy here on earth before your term of eternal bondage and no more choices ever starts in Pixidise?

          • Anton

            Actually I’m a slave of the Lord Jesus Christ. Grasp that while grasping my love of secular freedom and you grasp all.

          • Dreadnaught

            Jesus a slave owner – who’d a thought it.

          • Anton

            I volunteered.

          • dannybhoy

            He means ‘a servant of the Lord’ as all good Christians aspire to be,Dreadders. As you will understand when you finally accept God’s grace and are born again..

          • Anton

            Please don’t put words in my mouth. Please read the New Testament in the original Greek where the word is DOULOS, the main Greek word for slave. If you want to translate it as Servant then you come up against Paul in Romans explaining how he has been purchased by Christ exactly like slaves have.

          • Linus

            Grasp all? I can see that’s exactly what you do. From root to tip, with both hands. And then you jerk it back and forth until you wring a mindgasm out of it.

            That kind of mental masturbation may get you off, but the average man sees no point in wasting his life trying to reconcile the irreconcilable. If you’re a slave, you’re not free. If you’re not free, you’re a slave. Merely saying that being a slave makes you free doesn’t make it so. You can pronounce any words you like, but unless they make logical sense, they’re devoid of all meaning.

            There’s only one possible interpretation that gives your words sense. If you are Sky Pixie then you can certainly be a slave to yourself and be free to do what you like at the same time. And that’s how I understand the words of your masturbatory creed. You’re the ultimate narcissist: the devoted slave of your own ego and the imperious master of your own will.

            The banality and selfishness of your creed are sickening. And your singleminded determination to pursue your own advantage quite contemptible. That you’re powerless to influence any life beyond those of your own narrow circle is reassuring. But I pity the poor saps whose lives serve only to service your narcissism complex.

          • Anton

            As I said, grasp that I’m a slave of the Lord Jesus Christ while grasping my love of secular freedom and you grasp all. Fail to grasp it and you grasp nothing.

          • Linus

            I grasp nothing about you except the monumental ego that drives you to worship yourself. That’s quite enough for anyone to grasp. Grasping that leaves one with a profound distaste for grasping anything else to do with you.

          • Anton

            You are a slave to yourself. That’s a terrible situation.

          • Linus

            You are a slave to yourself, only you call your alter ego Sky Pixie in order to hide its true identity from yourself.

            This is much worse than a “terrible situation”. It’s a time bomb waiting to explode. Someday, somewhere the cognitive dissonance will get the better of you and catastrophic breakdown will ensue. I hope nobody standing nearby is taken out as collateral damage.

          • Anton

            Sexular humanists are most certainly slaves to themselves.

    • len

      Quite interesting to read the last comment on the thread and to try and guess what the discussion was originally about, bit like ‘Chinese whispers’ I suppose. I don’t suppose i’m allows to say ‘Chinese’, not PC ?.Oh whatever.

    • IrishNeanderthal

      It has got quite übertrieben (over the top).

    • Hi

      There was also the excitement of a New Zealand general election and “Jacindamania”.

  • David

    Thank you Mrs Proudie for another brilliant missive.
    Yes all can now see that the pretend Conservative Party has not a conservative bone in its body and, what is more, no respect for either the democratic process or the clearly expressed decision of the British people. This is clearly treachey and betrayal.
    Come back to politics Nigel, your country needs you !

  • It’s a superb account of the weeks’ events Mrs Proudie. Your annoyance with Mrs Dismay is palpable, I do agree with you, so much so that I have penned my disgust in an email to her at 10 Downing St.

    • Mrs Proudie of Barchester

      I will – I have already written to my MP so another broadside would be just the ticket! Many thanks Marie I am afraid the PM really upset my apple cart!

  • Father David

    How come that overblown puffball – Johnson, our joke of a Foreign Secretary, hasn’t been sacked by Mrs. Dismay?

    • Royinsouthwest

      Mrs. Dismay is the one that should be sacked. What has she ever achieved during her career?

      • bluedog

        Exactly. Mrs May is showing signs of being completely out of her depth and being ‘run’ by Phil Hammond who is ‘run’ by mandarin Sir Christopher Heywood. The concern has to be that May is too weak to survive and that Corbyn will win power as the Conservative mandate, based as it is on the DUP, collapses.

        • Father David

          Surely, you cannot be serious after her Florentine speech? I’ve never heard so many platitudes packed into a 5,000 word oration. The whole thing could have simply been summed up in two words – “WE SURRENDER!”

          • bluedog

            But you’re a Remoaner, you should be thankful for Mrs May’s surrender.

          • Father David

            Yes, but her dire platitudinous oration in Florence, failed to mention one vital inclusion – the promise of a referendum on the final deal. If the final deal reflects the Florentine speech then her troublesome tory right wingers, along with millions of others, would surely vote against it and the whole sorry Brexit fiasco would crumble and the happy prospect of remaining a member nation of the EU would be back on the table.

          • magnolia

            You need to do a lot more research into the beginning of the EU, the ideas behind it, what the US Govt. thought and why it encouraged it, its occultic connections, (look at Maurice Strong’s beliefs for a starr) and the fraud perpetrated on the people of the UK via Heath, (possibly held to ransom through his own dodgy predilections), together with the known mistruths told during the first referendum, before you come to a sound mind on the matter.

            Big clue: it is not a cosy club for those who wish to foster understanding and avoid nasty things called wars. If you think that you are clueless about the power of the military industrial complex, and the determination of the hard as nails men behind it.

          • Father David

            By coming to “a sound mind”, presumably that means agreeing with you Magnolia? I was interested to read in this morning’s Times that the truce following Mrs. Dismay’s speech in Florence has lasted a mere three days! How she hasn’t sacked bumbling Boris by now is a mystery. The sooner she does so the better for all concerned.

          • bluedog

            Ever been tempted to buy a bridge? This writer thinks he could sell you one.

          • Father David

            How much are you asking for it, it wouldn’t just happen to be in the region of £350 million a week by any chance?

          • bluedog

            No, but the figure you mention is the ‘freedom dividend’ that can be expected on departure from the Evil Empire of the EU. Thanks for high-lighting the benefit.

          • Father David

            In your dreams!

          • bluedog

            Encouraging to see that Labour is finally outing itself as the Subjugation Party – a group of intellectuals seeking to control the proletariat and bend them to its will rather than reflect their democratically expressed wish to leave the EU. There’s a word for the act of seeking subordination to the control of a foreign power.

          • Father David

            That’s not exactly how I would describe the next Labour government but I very much look forward to Jeremy Corbyn, the Prime Minister in waiting, taking over the residency of Number 10, following the disastrous Premiership of Mrs. Dismay.

          • bluedog

            Mrs May’s performance is undoubtedly calamitous in a political sense, but has she done anything that will do lasting damage to the UK? Of course not!

            Corbyn, on the other hand, is a complete nonentity of very limited talent. Even before the launch of his undistinguished parliamentary career, did he ever rise above the office of Probationary Junior Librarian at Neasden Polytechnic? One suspects not.

            Enthusiasm for Corbyn sets up a dangerous chain reaction, given his affiliation with certain terrorist groups such as Hamas and Hezbollah. Both these groups are committed to the destruction of Israel, and hence can be termed ‘anti-Semitic’. One notes Corbyn’s less than vigorous attempts at eradicating the virulent anti-Semitism now sweeping the Labour Party, in common with so much of the Western Left. One concludes that if Corbyn fully and sincerely supports Hamas and Hezbollah, he may be an anti-Semite himself.

            Now as a supporter of Corbyn, can you see where this sequence leads? Strictly entre-nous, are you an anti-Semitic bigot too? If not, prove your innocence.

          • CliveM

            There is only one reason for voting Corbyn, you hate this country.

          • Father David

            What a vile, pernicious, contemptible insinuation.
            LOVE GOD
            LOVE YOUR NEIGHBOUR AS YOURSELF.

          • bluedog

            Heavens, this is a bit SHOUTY. Let’s take a step back. You said, ‘I very much look forward to Jeremy Corbyn, the Prime Minister in waiting,’ From this unqualified statement of support one can conclude that you are in full agreement with Corbyn’s world view. Corbyn has been unashamed in his cultivation of terrorists, including anti-Semitic groups who seek the destruction of Israel. Is that what you mean by ‘LOVE YOUR NEIGHBOUR’? it isn’t clear. Neither is it clear whether you actually disapprove of Corbyn’s stance. Perhaps you are merely indifferent, one can’t tell. You proclaim your leftward bias, so does that include support for BDS, a position which appears to be fashionable within the CoE?

          • Father David

            Wasn’t that a wonderful reception for Jeremy, our Prime Minister in waiting at the Labour Party conference in Brighton as he delivered his Leader’s speech. Amazing how the impression of Mr. Corbyn is changing in the media. Yesterday, the Times cartoonist had him walking on water. Next week it’s the Nasty Party’s conference – I anxiously await and look forward to the kind of reception the current Prime Minister will receive. Probably not a united chorus of
            “Oh, oh, The-re-sa Ma- ay!”

          • bluedog

            ‘Amazing how the impression of Mr. Corbyn is changing in the media.’

            //www.telegraph.co.uk/news/2017/09/27/jeremy-corbyn-has-created-safe-space-anti-semitism-misogyny/

            So true.

          • Mrs Proudie of Barchester

            Oh come on, you write sermons….

          • Father David

            I presume that you write sermons for “My Lord, the bishop”?

      • James60498 .

        Well. She’s become Prime Minister and Home Secretary.

        Oh. I see. You mean what has she actually done that’s useful.

        I am a bit stuck there.

    • len

      The Tory party is a rudderless ship, with no one at the helm.

      • Father David

        Well, a clear alternative is waiting in the wings, willing and ready to take over the rudder just as soon as Ma Dismay calls another snap election which should have been called for the autumn by now, if it wasn’t for the venal DUP propping up the present shower.

        • bluedog

          What, you would favour a Corbyn govt. with Diane Abbott as Home Secretary?

          • Royinsouthwest

            It could be worse. Corbyn could decide to make her Chancellor of the Exchequer instead.

          • Father David

            I would certainly favour a Labour government as opposed to the current useless bunch who were expecting a Tory landslide in June and ended up losing seat after seat and having to rely upon the extremist DUP to prop them up. Who is in the next Cabinet will be entirely up to Mr. Corbyn, the Prime Minister in waiting.

          • bluedog

            There must be a reason that no previous Labour government has ever chosen Corbyn for ministerial office.

          • Mrs Proudie of Barchester

            Yes, its because he is bonkers.

          • bluedog

            Precisely. But alas, Father David believes that with Captain Corbyn at the helm of the ship of state a new era of enlightenment and prosperity will dawn. Captain Birdseye is a better bet. Is there something about the incense in his church about which we are not being told?

          • Father David

            There must be a reason why no previous Conservative government ever chose Camoron for ministerial office before he was elected leader of the party.
            Thank you Dave for cutting and running following your disastrous decision to hold an EU Referendum and leave the country with the Brexit chaos. It will be forever the albatross around your neck and the distinctive mark of what can be laughingly called your legacy to the nation.

          • Anton

            I too am grateful to Cameron for that decision.

          • bluedog

            Hmmm. Is it a case of call me Father Dave? But seriously, isn’t it typical of Labour that they effortlessly prove they are too stupid to learn from the mistakes of others? Of course, an alternative explanation is that the Left are so suffused with moral supremacy that they believe they can float above normality.

          • Mrs Proudie of Barchester

            Corbyn is to politics what syphilis is to polite conversation, a man who straddled the Abbott and see Hamas and Hezbollah as bosom buddies and Venezuela as paradise is not fit to hold the keys to number ten.

          • Chefofsinners

            More of a number 2 kinda guy.

          • Mrs Proudie of Barchester

            Is that toilet humour?

          • Dreary Steeple

            ‘extremist DUP’ , if only, the dupers are too near the centre for my liking.

          • Father David

            Well, Dreary, we can only be thankful that there are no Ukip MPs to prop up this lame duck government.

          • Anton

            Who is “we”?

          • Father David

            I refer the Honourable Gentleman to the results of the June General Election when Ukip’s vote plummeted drastically. Now they don’t even have a single MP, not even at Clacton.

          • Anton

            UKIP are suffering from the happy problem of having won their only cause. Now, would you answer the question?

          • Father David

            Well, your mate Farage doesn’t seem too happy with the outcome of his “victory” to date, nor indeed does his side-kick Rees-Mogg; both of whom seem to be spitting blood and feathers at Mrs. Dismay’s Florentine cave-in and it still seems to be civil war among the tory tribe over Brexit

          • Anton

            Yes, with any luck we shall crash out of the EU without a deal because of our inability to present a united front to the EU and EU intransigence.

          • Anton

            Why not just dig up Marx and Engels?

          • Chefofsinners

            Er, because Engels was cremated and his ashes were scattered off Beachy Head.

          • Anton

            You’re pedantic.

          • len

            Pedantic.Don’t get bogged down in details Chef.

          • Chefofsinners

            Just trying to save you a lot of digging. Details matter.

          • Father David

            Surely, that would be most unseemly and besides to perform such an act of desecration would require Home Office permission which I very much doubt Ms. Rudderless would allow.

          • len

            Con man Corbyn and disastrous Diane?. You are joking?

          • James60498 .

            Propped up by the pro-abortion, pro “gay marriage” IRA/SF?

          • len

            Hilarious?

          • bluedog

            Careful, len. She’s black, and any comment at all can be deemed a hate-crime at the victim’s absolute discretion.

          • len

            I am colour blind, I don`t see colour I see people.

          • Anton

            As it should be. But the law isn’t.

          • bluedog

            Highly commendable, len. The only problem is that not everyone, even persons of colour, feels the same way. Indeed, one only has to listen to the sayings of Diane Abbott to realise that if she wasn’t of black identity, she won’t have much to talk about.

      • Royinsouthwest

        Not even Amber Rudderless?

      • Chefofsinners

        Er, call me pedantic, but if there’s no rudder, there isn’t really any point having someone at the helm.

        • Anton

          You’re pedantic.

        • len

          No, precisely.

  • Hi

    You are all here ? What happened to this rapture event/ end of the world thingy?

    • dannybhoy

      Sorry, can’t hear you.
      You sound a very long way away…….

      • Sarky

        Specsavers do free hearing checks now!!

        • len

          Who said that?

    • IrishNeanderthal

      Hannah,

      I think I will let Alison Hinds comment on that:

    • Anton

      This was the claim:

      https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Revelation_12_Sign

      I did say in advance on this blog that I disagreed with the prediction that a semi-apocalyptic world event would happen on September 23.

      Please notice that the prediction was not specifically to do with the Rapture, and that in any case I and many other Christians do not hold to the timing of the Rapture that you have probably taken from popular trash films and novels. Google “pre-Tribulation Rapture” (that view) and “post-Tribulation Rapture” (the view I hold) if you wish to inform yourself better.

      • dannybhoy

        Jack T Chick had very definite views on The Rapture..
        https://www.chick.com/reading/tracts/5025/5025_01.asp
        I know you have definite opinions too Anton, so here’s a link to his biography.
        https://www.chick.com/information/authors/chick.asp

        • Anton

          Jack Chick had very definite views on many things, and many of them were nonsense. If you are going to attack the Church of Rome, at least get your facts right.

          • dannybhoy

            Where’d you get this stuff from Anton?
            First because I don’t like Uber, you decide I’m saying no one should use it, now because I reference Jack T Chick on the Rapture, I’m attacking the Church of Rome..

          • Anton

            Sorry for the misunderstanding in the preceding post Danny; my comment “If you are going to attack the Church of Rome, at least get your facts right” was addressed rhetorically to Chick, not you.

          • dannybhoy

            Thanks for clearing that up. I was becoming concerned at this alarming new development in your usually calm manner. I know you’re a stickler for accuracy, but this sudden sharpness was most unlike you, Anton.

    • Chefofsinners

      Pretty much the same thing you think has happened to the birth-of-the-messiah thingy.

    • len

      Still here….(sigh)

      • dannybhoy

        Good one Len!

      • betteroffoutofit

        Me too!

      • Cool. I didn’t know you lived in Wirral. I have relatives (ion laws) who live in Chester.

  • David

    The good ship Great Britain appears to be adrift, without power or direction. The absentee “Captain” Mrs Dismay is simply not capable of fulfilling the role of captain of the ship. She is a sycophantic Remainer lacking in any vision for her country , and disdaining to carry through the political instruction delivered unto her. Given that, in her speech she always referred to the UK public with the pronoun “they”, I doubt whether she even sees herself as one of us, and a servant of our constitutional processes. We desperately need a champion, arise Nigel Farage or his Jacob Rees-Mogg.

    • dannybhoy

      Anybody save Corbyn Monoxide, or Phil Hammond.
      I think we need a return to a time of heroes, inventors and entrepreneurs and people who were actually proud or at least pleased to be British…
      Goodness, if a tinpot dictator wearing a short back and sides and NHS spectacles can defy the world and get away with it, why can’t this great innovative and eccentric nation of ours do the same, but for the very best of reasons? Let’s get back with the Commonwealth nations, the little nations who grow coconuts and bananas and play rugby..and other nations willing to trade with us.
      Let’s remember our wonderful past, our development through the centuries, acknowledge our bad bits and modestly mention the great things we did.
      And so on and so on..

      • David

        Totally agree Danny boy. Am currently camped out in Vancouver airport awaiting our BA flight home. Thank for the U – tube link – it quite warmed the cockles of my heart !

    • Anton

      I’m becoming a bit of a Jacobite myself.

      • David

        Define Jacobism.

        • Dreadnaught

          Being a fan of the Moggster perhaps.

        • Anton

          Support for Jacob Rees-Mogg, of course! Is he Mrs Proudie’s MP by any chance?

      • David

        Spare yourself. I reminded myself of the history of the French Revolution. Hmm – being a Burkean conservative Jacobinism is a bit of a stretch. But given Mrs Dismays latest treacherymy trajectory is towards you!

  • dannybhoy

    I came close to it during my weight lifting days…

  • Inspector General

    Fellow Christians – the Inspectorates Anti Virus needs renewing. The incumbent is demanding a whopping £60 for 2 years. However, it still allows through a nuisance virus one is regularly sent (you know who you are…). It doesn’t incapacitate but it needs clearing out which takes time. Any sensible suggestion considered.

    God be with you all…

    • Sarky

      Stop irritating people??

      • Inspector General

        A pox on you Sarky

      • dannybhoy

        Yeah,,
        Why doncha??
        Only kidding Sarks.

    • dannybhoy

      Malwarebytes is supposed to be very good..

      • Anton

        Yes.

    • Royinsouthwest

      Would you be better off with a Mac?

      • Chefofsinners

        Dirty old one?

    • Chefofsinners

      I believe there has recently been significant progress in dealing with your condition.
      http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/health-41351159

    • Sybaseguru

      Teach you to use those dodgy websites. I don’t bother with AV, just set your user so you can’t install stuff by removing admin rights. Before you do that set up an admin that you only use to install stuff, but don’t use on the web. Alternatively use a proper operating system like xubuntu.

    • David

      I recommend an Applemac- they are almost immune to viruses, and more intuitive to use, an useful feature for I T challenged moi.

    • bluedog

      We’ve been here before, IG. A crisis in your security detail seems to be an all too regular occurrence. Other voices have recommended a Mac, although you will need MS Office programmes to retain your sanity. Can’t stand the Mac equivalents. As to security, we keep an old PC laptop for Netflix bingeing and that is protected by Kaspersky. As you would be aware, Eugene Kaspersky is an alumnus of a well-known Russian multi-disciplinary research institute, where they don’t do things by halves. No doubt Kaspersky protects the Trump family’s computers, and you can’t get a higher recommendation than that.

      • Inspector General

        Awesome, bluedog, as the Americans would say…

  • not a machine

    mmm so Cant discuss brexit at Brighton ????? can you get a refund ?
    like the good ole days at Pravda , airbrush em out 🙂

  • Sybaseguru

    I have great sympathy with the difficulty in buying a bucket, but clearly this young lady hasn’t visited HSBC recently. Mum died, but I had power of attorney, so you would think that when I took the probate letter along that all would be sweetness and light. I even took my passport to prove who I was.
    “But I need to prove your address” – but its on both the probate and POA, isn’t that good enough? This was just the start. I think they’ve promoted the cleaner to Manager and haven’t bother to train her.

  • Dreadnaught

    Never mind a bag for Life – Lidle now have a bag for Death.

    • Anton

      “There is death in the pot” – 2 Kings 4:40.

  • Anton

    So AfD are “far right” according to the BBC, for being sick of Merkel letting in millions of people dedicated to the destruction of Western civilisation? Take about useful idiots…

    Angela Merkel might end up going down as the most disastrous Reichskanzler in history. In view of who she is up against for that title, it would be an extraordinary achievement.

    • Dominic Stockford

      BBC Lunchtime news chose NOT to use ‘far’, merely ‘right’ in their headline. Still inaccurate, but an Interesting change!

      • Anton

        The headlines on the BBC website remain that AfD is “far right” at the time of writing.

  • Dominic Stockford

    If our ‘leaders’ were merely poltroons I think we would be blessed. They are in fact far worse than that.

  • bluedog

    It’s probably just laziness but after nearly twenty-five years on MS programmes it’s hard to adapt to the Mac copy. Anyway, I’ve still got old MS Word files that I regularly use and it’s somehow easier just to keep them going. Can’t stand the Mac calendar programme, nothing like as intuitive as the MS equivalent. Agree your thoughts on Mail.

    • dannybhoy

      My laptop (‘borrowed’ from the wife) runs on Windows 10 and I have Microsoft Office. The best OS imo was Windows XP, the most intuitive version. I would transfer Office to my iMac, but it’s easier to just switch computers.
      I do like Mission control.

  • Father David

    It all depends upon which paper you read. The Labour Leader himself mentioned in his conference speech how many pages the Daily Mail devoted to rubbishing him just before the June General Election and look what happened there! A significant increase in both votes and seats for Labour. Wasn’t it wonderful when Labour won Canterbury – if they can win there then access to Number 10 can’t be that far away. Jeremy then went on to make a plea that the editor of that particular extremely noxious right-wing rag increase the number of pages assigned to negative coverage of the Labour Party which will undoubtedly backfire and assist in considerably increasing even yet further Labour’s vote and tally of seats at the next General Election. I note that in June the Foreign Secretary’s own majority dropped from roughly 10,000 to a mere 5,000 thus making Uxbridge a marginal seat but not nearly so marginal as Amber Rudd’s slim majority at Hastings and Rye. Both seats are now within Labour’s sights. So, Bring it on.

    • bluedog

      ‘Probably not a united chorus of

      “Oh, oh, The-re-sa Ma- ay!”

      One rather likes a political party that doesn’t resort to mindless slogans and stirring ‘battle hymns’ to get its message across. Slogans are an emotional substitute for reasoned debate and policy formulation, would you not agree?

      Anyway, keep the blue flag flying.

      • Father David

        Dear boy, what are “strong and stable”, “coalition of chaos” and “getting our country back” if they aren’t “mindless slogans”? As for battle hymns – “Land of hope and glory” springs to mind. No wonder you are so blue!

        • bluedog

          There’s a clear distinction between election messaging and the sort of internal sloganeering at which Labour excels. If your target demographic is the British ummah, you need to keep it simple. Similarly there is a distinction between Land of Hope and Glory and the Internationale. The former is a tribute to Britain and its people, the latter advocates solidarity with the international community in the name of Marxism.

          • Father David

            Personally, I much prefer the soul stirring tune to the Red Flag – it goes so well to the hymn –

            O Christmas tree, O Christmas tree
            How lovely are your branches

            “FOR THE MANY
            not the few”

          • bluedog

            Thrillingly syncretic. A blend of Christianity and Marxism, lightly tossed with a drizzle of German paganism.

          • Father David

            It is said that the Christians of the Early Church are often regarded as the first communists – holding everything in common (see Acts 2: 42-47).
            Let me assuage your concerns that in matters of religion I am entirely orthodox.