corbyn-victory-2016
Democracy

Corbyn’s mission is Christian socialism – but the country will never vote for it

“So enthused by @JeremyCorbyn4PM win today,” tweeted the Rev’d Dr Giles Fraser, on hearing of the victorious re-election of Jeremy Corbyn as leader of the Labour Party. “The world is a better place for it,” he added, despite the global assessment being somewhat restricted to the delight of the IRA, Iran, Hamas, Hezbollah and Vladimir Putin.

So much of what Jeremy Corbyn longs to realise coheres with the precepts of Christian socialism – or the rhetoric concurs with a form of it. If you believe that the teachings of Christ offer peace through equality, dignity by welfare, and justice for the poor with the end of austerity, then Jeremy Corbyn is the chosen one. He comes to smash all that is Tory and evil, advocating community over individualism; redistribution over capitalism; society over selfishness; charity over greed. He wants to scrap trident, and turn swords into ploughshares: “Wouldn’t it be wonderful if every politician around the world, instead of taking pride in the size of their armed forces… abolished their army and took pride in the fact the fact they don’t have an army,” he said at the Hiroshima Remembrance service in 2012. “Surely that is the way we should be going forward,” he exhorted, to the delight of despots and aggressors the world over.

For the undoubted (vast) majority of vicars and bishops in the Church of England, Jeremy Corbyn comes to love the lost, feed the hungry, heal the sick, elevate the poor, and free the captives from a decade of Tory oppression. The Archbishop of York must be delighted that someone else grasps the imperative of the extreme left-wing “theology of where I am coming from“. The rich will howl as the wages of the labourers rise; the wicked will gnash their teeth as the widows and orphans of the world are welcomed in the land. And God help the moneylenders. Jeremy will bring justice; Corbyn commands compassion. At last, the New Jerusalem can be built in England’s re-ordered green and pleasant land (forget Scotland), and righteousness will flow like a statist-socialist stream. It is a liberation theology for mutuality, solidarity and interdependence. Everyone is equally valued; children are educated fairly; all skills are recognised and put to productive use. Who needs the dog-eat-dog casino world of market forces when state-intervention, social ownership, co-operatives and collectives are manifestly more beneficial than gluttony, waste and greed?

The problem is that Jeremy Corbyn is completely unelectable as a national leader. Whatever 60 per cent of Labour Party members believe, the country will never vote for his social programme or buy into his Corbynomic vision. He will not destroy the Labour brand, but he will certainly tarnish it with the patina of the Marxist-Leninist brotherhood. Rumours of imminent revolution may play well on the shop floor or in Guardian comment threads, but the English, the evolutionary British, just don’t do revolution. While the United Kingdom, led by a Conservative Prime Minister, forges a future of post-EU social freedom and economic fulfilment in the world, the Labour Party, led by a Trotskyist, seeks to re-forge a past of social control and economic Marxism.

But none of this is Jeremy Corbyn’s fault. No, the Labour Party possessed all the necessary checks and balances to ensure that no left-wing ‘extremist’ could seize the leadership and mould the machine to his (or her) shiny militant likeness. It was the Parliamentary Party who ensured that the name of Corbyn appeared on the ballot paper in order that the party might have a “full debate on policy“. Of course, the 35 MPs who originally nominated him include some un-reconstituted and unashamed ‘Old Labour’ names like Dennis Skinner, John McDonnell and Diane Abbott, but “morons” include Dame Margaret Beckett, John Cruddas, Frank Field, Kelvin Hopkins, Sadiq Khan… They genuinely believed that the enlightened, discerning, intelligent party membership would have the good sense to “dismiss the crazy views of the left in favour of a more mainstream candidate”. They’ve obviously never read their Plato.

Democracy is a wonderful thing: the world is indeed a better place for it. But there is no point having good intentions for government if you can’t get things done, like altering a few outcomes and making a few lives more livable. Is the proclamation of pure principle really better than the exercise of accommodated power?

  • Politically__Incorrect

    Underneath the rosy exterior idealism of Corbyns Labour lies a cesspool of hate and bile as illustrated by the regular abuse of Labour MPs by party members. No doubt that vitriol would manifest itself as party policy were Labour to form a government. Labour has becone the nasty party. The voters are not blind to it. The patty is buoyed up leftist ideologues but not by popular support from the electorate.

    • preacher

      Agreed ! For sure it wasn’t a member of any other party that threw the rock through the window of Ms Eagle’s local office when she stood in opposition to Corbyn. But she seems to have got the message & got back in line quite sharpish.

      • Mike Stallard

        Fascism and Socialism go hand in hand. It is seen as”authentic” to swear, to behave badly, to abuse Tory Toffs, to loathe people who are not on your side. Once de-humanised these “scum” can be wiped off and got rid of. Over the past couple of years, I have made myself go on leftie websites. Lots of ad hominem. Lots of bad language. Lots of hate. Very little common sense or real knowledge and research.

        • Pubcrawler

          “I have made myself go on leftie websites. Lots of ad hominem. Lots of
          bad language. Lots of hate. Very little common sense or real knowledge
          and research.”

          Yes, the Telegraph isn’t what it once was, is it?

          • Inspector General

            A damn good paper, sir!

          • Pubcrawler

            Once.

  • Inspector General

    Magnifico Giornata !

  • Jings

    Why not? All they have to do is persuade the voters.

    • Inspector General

      Good Point, and Good Luck…

  • chefofsinners

    Is Corbyn unelectable? The electorate is a beast of passion, not logic. It has a form of Tourette’s syndrome and lashes out unpredictably. Underestimate it at your peril.

    • Inspector General

      It’s all a question of marginals, old chap. The 40 or 50 seats that change at each and every election and tend to become the same as the new governing party. Gloucester is one of them. Will Corbyn win in Gloucester? Not a chance…

      • chefofsinners

        Anyone who still thinks the exceptional cannot happen in British politics has not been paying attention recently.
        The threat of Corbyn lies not in winning the middle ground but in mobilising those who have never voted before, or have voted for no-hope minority parties.

        • Inspector General

          The only votes Corbyn can count on is the urban peasantry and the young sons and daughters of the middle class in the main. This man delights in reminding anyone else, including working men, that Labour is more concerned with the workshy and bringing in immigrants from piss poor parts of the world to boost it’s vote.

          • Mike Stallard

            I am not sure I agree with this. There are an awful lot of people from “Uni” who look upon him as a senior lecturer and NUS President. Now, as minor teachers, minor officials in the NHS, Librarians, perhaps doctors, minor lecturers or police they are treating him like a pop star from Glastonbury. Their war cry is No Austerity (which means please can they keep their meagre jobs) and they are backed by their unions. They do not very much like zero hours contracts and they loathe the way that Mr Cameron reduced the Police and the bureaucracy by a staggering tens of thousands. They think they are working class. They think they qualify for vulnerability. And as at Uni they can make and wave placards and shout like Primary School children.

          • Inspector General

            Acadamia are too few in number and those who have left it are engaged in coping with the ‘real world’ outside. The only true Labour people in the public services are the pain in the arse union activists. The fact is that living standards have improved over the years and everybody is far too busy finding a holiday destination where they won’t be machine gunned on the beach. Malta is very popular these days…

          • CliveM

            Reports are that the traditional Meditteranean destinations are already banging up the prices. Good news for Greece I suppose.

          • Inspector General

            The resident muslim population of Malta is a healthy 0%. The Island is clean of that religion, if you will. The Islamic transients that are there are engaged in getting to Italy and presumably to the land of milk and Germanic honey. Can’t see the Maltese security people stopping them, either…

          • CliveM

            Every year the boss says “oh look Egypt/Tunisia/Turkey (or whatever) is really cheap” and I say “maybe, but funerals aren’t “.

            Islam is bleeding itself into the desert and if it wasn’t for the innocents being caught up in it, I’d cheer.

          • Inspector General

            One can imagine the socialists outrage. “What, no muslims resident in Malta? We must arrange 50,000 to go there immediately. For cultural diversity, and because it’s the right thing to do.”

          • Fine Catholic country … First Western nation to become Christian. The Constitution of Malta declares Catholicism as the state religion. Abortion in Malta is illegal. It is the only country in the European Union to prohibit abortion entirely.

          • Dominic Stockford

            The last paragraph utterly undoes anything good in the first two.

          • It is disquieting. However, abortion and divorce are greater threats to the stability of family life than is some civil toleration of homosexuality.

          • Dominic Stockford

            I notice the dissembling of the bit you don’t like in order to place blame elsewhere than it belongs (provided you really do believe what you said: Fine Catholic country) whilst at the same time claiming credit for Romanism for what you do like.

          • What is this Romanism of which you speak?

          • Dominic Stockford

            Don’t be a twit. It is most unbecoming.

          • Romanism is a word that was used as a derogatory term for Roman Catholicism in the past when anti-Catholicism was more common in the United States and the United Kingdom.

            After the Reformation and until at least the late 20th Century, majority Protestant states (especially England, Germany, the United States, and Canada) made anti-Catholicism and opposition to the Pope and Catholic rituals major political themes, with anti-Catholic sentiment at times leading to violence and religious discrimination against Catholic individuals (often derogatorily referred to in Anglophone Protestant countries as “papists” or “Romanists”).
            Historically, Catholics in Protestant countries were frequently (and almost always baselessly) suspected of conspiring against the state in furtherance of papal interests or to establish a political hegemony under the “Papacy”, with Protestants sometimes questioning Catholic individuals’ loyalty to the state and suspecting Catholics of ultimately maintaining loyalty to the Vatican rather than their domiciled country.

            You probably believe Titus Oates was telling the truth.

          • Royinsouthwest

            Unfortunately the worse the problems of Middle Eastern and North African countries get, the stronger support for extremism grows. If someone from a poor background gets a job in tourism, that is reasonably well paid by the standards they are used to, then they will want more tourists to come to their country. If they are unemployed and cannot see any prospect of finding a job because the economy is getting worse, not better, then they may think that they have nothing to lose by supporting extremists.

            I’m not suggesting people should go on holiday to Muslim countries. Only an idiot would not understand why people are preferring other destinations. Unfortunately the affected countries are in danger of being stuck in a vicious circle where terrorism damages their economies thereby creating conditions in which terrorism flourishes.

          • CliveM

            Yes I would agree, but at the moment I can’t see a way out. I think things are going to get an awful lot worse.

            And sadly it will be the innocent who will be most harmed.

    • A lot can happen in four years.

      • Inspector General

        What will happen in the run up to 2020 is that the electorate will be reminded daily that a Labour government will invariably require a coalition with the 50 odd SNP members. Can you imagine the price they will charge England for that…

        • Don’t even think about it! Stop speculating that far and live in the now. The next task is to get us out of the EU/single market, control immigration and get our fishing rights restored. Actions speak louder than words and the people will reward those who bring them actual results.

          • Inspector General

            That far? 2020 is just down the street. One can almost see it…

            Be good to see us have a navy again. It could be fishing patrols and firing across bows might be needed to persuade others the plunder days are over…..

          • Mike Stallard

            And we can do all of that within the EEA and if we just have the sense to join EFTA. Oh – and the CAP will go too.
            PS We need to negotiate our way out of the Single market. That is why it is best to remain in EEA while we do it.

          • I think you’ll find we are already a member of the European Economic Area as it was the precursor to the European Union. We don’t want to join the European Free Trade Association as this was set up for Norway, Iceland and Liechtenstein, it might be fine for what the Norwegians require but it’s not for the UK.
            In case you had forgotten, 17.5 British people voted to take back control of our country NOT to join the EFTA or stay in the EEA as this would be akin to staying in the EU. WE W

          • Mike Stallard

            Advantages of EFTA: CAP/CFP – kaput. Immigration is opened up as a discussion point with Article 112 of the EEA agreement. Freedom to negotiate our own trading agreements with international standards organisations and trading policies.
            And you talk about Norwegian strikers! Honestly!

          • big

            Mike no one is talking about Norwegian strikers,we’re talking about a supranational court that can impose EU law via the EEA agreement….the EFTA court…it’s a supranational court and has a very close relationship with the ECJ…..how much of that don’t you understand…. as for CFP,I am sure you are old enough to remember the cod wars!!!! Iceland are a totally unreliable partner for us,you really would be very foolish if you thought otherwise.

          • big

            Mike you should take Marie’s advice,see also my comments above….also you really need to do some independent research, i would start with the recent EFTA court case against Norwegian dock workers….i really would look at that case carefully Mike, because the EEA agreement isn’t doing Norway any favours.

          • big

            Marie you have an answer to your comment bellow from Mike,who incidentally lives in a fantasy world,he thinks going into EEA/EFTA will be great for the UK, a kind off departure lounge,where we can sit, for a few years……..,or decades,…no one can give an exact answer for how long!!!…. oh until we can sort ourselves out and decide what we’re going to do next,yeah in your dreamworld Mike!!!! this mad idea should be challenged when ever it raises it’s ugly stupid head, this so called Norway option is not Brexit!!…..we will still be controlled by the EU…..you only have to read into the EFTA court rulings to see what this will mean for the UK….it certainly won’t be “British jobs for British worker’s”,if you don’t believe me, then do a search into Norwegian dock workers who lost their case in April, at the EFTA court this year,it involved issues pertaining to freedom of movement and human right!!!!! infact the EFTA court is classified as an supranational court,and it coordinates very,very closely with ECJ…….
            EEA/EFTA option= technically out of the EU but still controlled by it via the EFTA/ECJ court nexus of supranational law. OUT MEANS OUT.

          • I’m with you on this. The tentacles of the EU are wide ranging, their satellite courts control ever more areas of our life and laws.

          • big

            Agreed, however some people like Mike and his friends over at the EURef blog think otherwise…..they really are deranged…..they can’t see,or except the Norway option would in fact by the final destination and not the journey in stages they think, also called Flexcit……barmy…really, really dumb idea that would get the euro sceptic cause put back decades

  • Orwell Ian

    While it is undoubtedly true the the British just don’t do revolutions the same cannot be said for those activists devoted to the causes of International Socialism and Marxism. The enlightened culturati have triumphed. Momentum has secured its revolution. The chosen one is enthroned (again). But “One does not establish a dictatorship in order to safeguard a revolution; one makes the revolution in order to establish the dictatorship – G Orwell) The object of power is power. The Labour party will now be reshaped in the image of its “saviour”. Standby for the purge.

  • Martin

    Surely democracy is about what I want, not what is best.

    • Dreadnaught

      No that is Facsism.

      • Inspector General

        Remainism…

      • Martin

        With fascism you don’t get the choice.

        • Dreadnaught

          O fcourse not but Il Duce does.

          • Martin

            That was my point.

  • David

    Those who try to create heaven of earth, under the rule of human beings, inevitably create a hell. Socialism leads to tyranny.
    Lightly regulated government and gradual reform is the English path to success, and the Burkean way.
    The best that we fallen humans can do is to muddle along, working always to reduce injustices and encourage as many as possible to fulfil their potential.
    Corbyn is a godsend as he will keep Labour in the wilderness for a very long time.

  • len

    The ship that was labour has now become’ the Flying Dutchman ‘with comrade Corbyn at the tiller and a momentous crew ,sometimes spotted at sea with its ghostly crew but never coming into port.
    Probably a good thing for the rest of us…

    • Dreadnaught

      I think the ship of which you speak is actually The Flying Pig.

  • Inspector General

    BBC News “Jeremy Corbyn: I’ll give more power to activists”

    How do you go about being an activist? Well, you find yourself a stone…

  • Dreadnaught

    I have heard that Corbyn’s nickname is Albert RN; after the dummy marched in and out of the PoW compounds in WW2.

    • carl jacobs

      What is this story?

      • Dreadnaught

        Its a movie based on fact called Albert RN [royal navy] where a dummy of a naval officer was supported by being held either side by prisoners in the centre of the group giving the impression of a full compliment while one of the number was actually going over the wire

  • John

    The Turkey Party votes for Christmas by a clear 6/4 margin. What a cracker.

  • Albert

    Since Blair came to power, we have bewailed the fact that politicians are so unprincipled they will do anything to get elected. Congratulations to the Labour Party for now doing anything not to get elected. That takes principle.

  • Mike Stallard

    I really hope your Grace is right about him never being elected. I really do.
    We had two Venezuelans in our English class on Thursday, an accountant and a professional guitarist. Now both are working in a local dog food factory.

    • Anton

      If they don’t like it they are free to return to Venezuela.

  • CliveM

    There are at least 3 reasons why it is improbable that Corbyn will get elected:

    Labour can no longer rely on the 50 seats from Scotland. And an Islington socialist isn’t going to reverse this trend.
    Boundary changes are going to lose them seats. So simply to stay stick, they need to gain significant votes.
    Corbyn is an idiot. By that I don’t mean he is left wing or a Trot, but that he repeatedly does and says stupid things. By all accounts he has no control over his own office.

    In addition he is a nasty piece of work, who turns a blind eye to antisemitism and violence against his own MP’s.

    • Mike Stallard

      You must admit, though, that he is a bit teflon – look at the lie in the train, for instance, or the death of that MP. The cuddling up to levantine terrorists does not seem to have hurt him much either.

      • CliveM

        But look also where he stands in the polls.

  • Pubcrawler

    Guido’s summary of ‘today at the conference’

    http://order-order.com/2016/09/25/today-at-labour-conference/

    This is even more loony than the early 1980s…

    • CliveM

      You know if the Conservative party talked and behaved in a similar fashion, there would be wall to wall condemnation on the BBC.

  • chefofsinners

    Nice picture of Corblimey.
    Looks like someone asked him to hold up one finger for every seat Labour are going to win at the next election.

    Either that or he’s thumbing a lift. It’s a neat summary of socialism: ‘Who would like to give me a free ride?’

    • len

      Comrade Corbyn is a puppet with Momentum pulling the strings.The thumbs up movement and the self satisfied sarcastic smirk are expressions of sheer glee of Momentums take over of the Labour party.

  • Shadrach Fire

    “Corbyn’s mission is Christian socialism”
    Why is it my spirit is not leaping for joy?

    • Inspector General

      One is reminded of the socialist thuggery that said there can be no more Grammar Schools, and this was set in stone. So, whilst they fight amongst themselves, we can free people’s children from the low standards previously imposed, because of the “no one can be better than anyone else ” school of Marxism.

      On the religious side, how will lefty priests deal with this, other than badly…

  • bluedog

    It’s all for the best, Your Grace. Barring a palace coup within the Parliamentary Conservative Party, one can easily envisage Mrs May serving as PM until 2025, at which time she will be a sprightly 69 and ready for a peerage. On the other hand Mr Corbyn will be 76, and possibly unable to fend off a determined challenge from say, Yvette Cooper, still only an athletic 56. Eight years of stability under Mrs May could prove to be exactly what a post-Brexit Britain needs.

  • IanCad

    It would seem to me that Corbyn’s victory is yet another example of the electorate, not so much endorsing his policies, but of being completely fed up with MP’s who seem to reside on a different planet.
    Brexit was a straw in the wind. Could those same voter sentiments propel Donald Trump into the White House? Tonight’s debate should be interesting.

  • dannybhoy

    “So much of what Jeremy Corbyn longs to realise coheres with the precepts of Christian socialism – or the rhetoric concurs with a form of it. If you believe that the teachings of Christ offer peace through equality, dignity by welfare, and justice for the poor with the end of austerity, then Jeremy Corbyn is the chosen one. ”
    Christian Socialism? No such a thing. Only the Gospel of reconciliation and making men new from within by the power of the Holy Spirit.
    If Christian Socialism is what some vicars and whatevers want, it would explain why so many act like social workers..

  • bockerglory

    And that is why Jesus said “give to Caesar what is due to Caesar ….” In other words, earthly leaders are just that – earthly and prone to error. Christians should vote for the leader for what that individual thinks would be best from administrative law and justice purpose. Earthly leaders are just administrators. Christians should advise and counsel (like Daniel & Joseph) for the sake of peaceful co-existence but the earthly leaders are not God.

    Applying this to Corbyn, could he lead a government to run the country competently? If he cannot, then perhaps we should not vote for him. As for socialism – Jesus said we would always have the poor and man alone does not live on bread. Jesus is saying, this earthly life we live will always have differences in wealth and it is individual compassion that makes the difference (govt. Can never rid the world of injustice, hunger, pain or death – only God can do that).

  • len

    Christianity will never fit in with this present world system.
    The only way Christianity will fit into this world system is to make compromises with Christianity and a ‘compromised Christianity’ isn’t Christianity at all Catholicism and Anglicanism has proved that!.

    (How long before the inquisition turn up?)

  • bugalugs2

    Corbyn’s mission is not ‘Christian socialism’, it is secular Marxism. Christ did not advocate taking money off the wealthy in taxes underpinned by the threat and use of force, he advocated that those with money should choose voluntarily to give their own money away. The two positions are radically different.

    • Alan Bartley

      Agree! True Christian Socialists do not believe it is the State’s duty to become the all protecting providing parent. It believes in obtaining for the workers in hand or brain the just full fruits of their labour. So no state robbery/wealth transfer from the working to the non-working, whatever is needed has to be through spontaneous Christian Charity.

      Paul’s dictum that if a man would not work neither should he eat – only applies where he can work. Thus old Labour sought FULL EMPLOYMENT in a ZERO INFLATION economy – both are impossible today’s Keynsianism. In fact Labour has come to accept the not-working-for-several-generations underclass and written them off apart from buying their votes with generous State benefits, benefits that Corbyn/McDonnell have pledged to increase and continue – this requires massive wealth transfer from all classes including the working class who will thus never receive the full fruit of our labour promised us in the old Clause 4. The whole Corbyn/McDonnell/Old Labour project is fatally flawed and dishonest to offer.

  • Dominic Stockford

    Having just looked at the detail, and presentation, of Tom Watson’s speech it is fortunate he is not the Labour Leader.