Boko Haram children burned 2
Extremism

Boko Haram burns children alive, but no EU 'open door' to Nigerian refugees

 

Some two thousand miles away in Deir ez-Zur, Syria, Islamists have besieged the city of 120,000 souls. Women are raped in the street, men beheaded on the banks of the Euphrates, and children are left to starve. The Islamic State (aka Daesh) is in control, and our media and political class insist that we must open our borders to those who can flee the persecution.

Some two thousand miles away in Dalori, Nigeria, Islamists have beseiged the village of an unknown number of souls. Women are shot, men blown to smithereens, and children burned alive in their homes. Boko Haram (which has pledged allegiance to the Islamic State, aka Daesh) is in control, and our media and political class have condemned the slaughter.

Why does the EU insist on opening its borders to Syrian refugees fleeing the Islamist terror, but not to Nigerian refugees fleeing the Islamist terror? Tens of thousands are scrambling for their lives; hundreds of thousands are internally displaced, living and partly living in the squalor and stench of faeces-ridden cities of sodden canvas. Yet we offer sanctuary only to Middle-Eastern evacuees, and not to those from Sub-Saharan Africa. Why is that?

Are Daesh suicide bombers more deadly than those of Boko Haram? Do raped Syrian women cry louder or longer than raped Nigerians? Is the whining of starving children worse than the squealing of those burning to death? Don’t the bodies of Nigerian men bleed as much as Syrians? Isn’t a Boko Haram bullet just as deadly as one fired by Daesh?

It is estimated that Boko Haram has slaughtered around 20,000 and driven 2.5 million Nigerians from their homes over the past six years. Our media and political class routinely condemn the barbarity, which is every bit as agonising as the struggle and strife throughout Syria. Indeed, according to the Global Terrorism Index, Boko Haram has overtaken Daesh as the world’s deadliest terror group. But not a senior voice is raised in Church or State demanding immediate asylum for Nigerians – not even for 3,000 orphans plucked directly from the soulless refugee camps of Minawao. The BBC helpfully provides facts at-a-glance; the Guardian reports matter-of-factly; politicians are mostly mute, and the bishops.. well..

My Lords, will the Minister join me in expressing his appreciation of those moderate Muslims who have spoken out in this country against Boko Haram and in emphasising the continuing need to be proactive in drawing together those communities that would easily find themselves pitched against each other in our towns and cities?

Why aren’t politicians, bishops and the media screaming for the EU to open its borders to the Nigerian victims of Islamist barbarity? Is it ‘cos they is black? Or is it ‘cos they is Christian? Does God love Nigerians less than Syrians? Does He care less about their burning? Is the humanity and dignity of the black Nigerian not equal to that of the brown Syrian? Is their oppression any less? Before the Cross, is our relative institutionalised indifference not crying out for a political theology to challenge the callous ranking of the suffering of other human ‘others’?

  • Dreadnaught

    But this is ‘nothing to do with religion of Islam’; the religion of peace…

    • Merchantman

      Er, of course not. Peace, peace and then the end shall come.

      • Dreadnaught

        Er..Duh!

        • Anton

          Merchantman was being sarcastic and quoting scriptures about people saying “peace” when there is no peace.

          • Dreadnaught

            You think I wasn’t being sarcastic in the first place Ant?

          • Anton

            I think you were, but it wasn’t clear to me that you thought Merchantman was.

          • Dreadnaught

            I still don’t see the sarcasm as Islam apologists say peace will come when the world is all Islamic.

          • Anton

            I took Merchantman to be sarcastic because of the total absence of peace within and between Islamic lands. This runs back all the way to the Sunni-Shia split within one generation of Mohammed.

          • Merchantman

            Those of a Anti-Christ bent are prone to proclaiming Peace when a particularly nasty and present danger is in sight; its one of the determining litmus tests of who is in which team; who gets it and who doesn’t.

  • Ian G

    Is it ‘cos Nigeria used to be part of the Empire and we can’t be seen to be colonialist? Black? Christian? Commonwealth? Will the rest of the Commonwealth speak out, please? We have no leadership in the UK anymore.

  • Ivan M

    The Syrian refugee crisis was manufactured by Turkey and Saudi Arabia, as a means to pressure the West to overthrow Assad. Assad is still around, and Ms Merkel has said that the “refugees” can’t stay forever. There is no comparable imperative operating in Africa. I’ve read that upward of three million people have died in the Congo, as a result of the “resource wars” that went on for about a decade. Hardly anyone seems to be bothered about that.

  • sarky

    Its because there is no guilt. We are not bombing Nigeria.

    • Anton

      Well said. Also, I’m sure that our PM, who enacted gay marriage without any manifesto mandate, has noted that the Anglican church in Nigeria is strongly against it in contrast to many liberals in the CoE here.

      • sarky

        I doubt that’s even a consideration. Black africa has always been ignored, its only when these things are publicly highlighted, like the news reports from Ethiopia in vthe 80’s, that the public conscious is awakened and the govermnent is forced to act by the weight of public opinion.
        Will we see pictures of burnt kids on the bbc? I doubt it. Its the wrong sort of horrific death isnt it?

        • Anton

          The thing is, regardless of your or my opinion of gay marriage or aid packages, Western governments have been talking seriously about withholding aid from African countries that they regard as homophobic. So it IS on the radar of people like Cameron.

          • Dreadnaught

            We should be trading not aiding. The money goes to buy fleets of Mercedes for governments who don’t give a crap about their own nations apart from what they can screw out of them.

          • Anton

            That’s one good reason. Another is that it is not the UK government’s business to give tax revenues away.

          • Dreadnaught

            Isn’t Charity enshrined in Christianity?

          • Anton

            Yes, but charity means voluntary giving and taxation isn’t voluntary. The personal response to distress and the political response should not necessarily be the same.

          • sarky

            Then Jesus said to them, “Give back to Caesar what is Caesar’s and to God what is God’s.” And they were amazed at him.

          • Phil R

            It wasn’t about taxation

          • Dreadnaught

            In calling for a return to a Christian country surely it follows that the country assumes the voluntary nature of the giving. Taxation is concomitant with nationhood; you cant escape it if you want the security that being a citizen of a secure nation demands.

          • Anton

            Tax me more and I have less I can give to charity. Also it is absolutely not the job of your government to use tax revenue to run other countries than your own.

          • sarky

            Sorry but I can’t agree. The two can’t be equated.

          • IrishNeanderthal

            Agree? Me neither.

            Although our agitator class keep going on about “Islamophobia” and “homophobia”, and more recently “xenophobia”, they’re quite different and distant legs on the same centipede, and one hardly relates to the other.

          • The Explorer

            Don’t know about the US and Nigeria, but in Nairobi in 2012, the US embassy hosted Kenya’s first gay pride event (on US initiative) with the words, “The US government for its part has made it clear that the advancement of human rights for LGBT people is central to our human rights policies around the world and to the realization of our foreign policy goals.”

            That suggests to me that Anton has a valid point.

  • Shadrach Fire

    When will someone speak up that there will forever be enmity between the seed of the bond and of the free.

    • Anton

      I’m confused by that; if you are making a reference to Isaac and Ishmael, this isn’t about Israel. Do you mean something else?

  • IanCad

    Utterly sickening YG. We are ruled by the most gutless, abject curs.
    It was a black day for Nigeria when British rule ended and the district commissioners ceased their benign authority. And so it was for most of those other backward lands who, once, benefited so greatly from British administration, legislation, sanitation, transportation, irrigation and – to define the whole; civilization.

    • Anton

      Not to mention his predecessors. But sturdier times may return.

      • IanCad

        Not while the H&SE rules the land.

        • Anton

          As I said, sturdier times may return.

    • David

      Well said Ian.

  • preacher

    Empires crumble & fall. We are no longer the British Empire, we have sold our birthright for a slice of E.U cake & the only thing that matters to our leaders is to ‘negotiate’ the size of the slice. We sit comfortably in our Ivory tower of the Western Nanny State & worry about – sugar while others die, out of sight out of mind.
    Thank you Dr Cranmer for highlighting this horror. I know that many thousands read your reports, may this one contribute to the relief of those suffering in Nigeria at the hands of unrestrained evil.

  • len

    ‘The thief ‘comes to kill steal and to destroy. ‘The thief ‘of course is Satan and he is working everywhere we see brutality, murder, rape, and terrorist activity.
    This evil spirit has entered into sections of humanity throughout time and is now the driving power behind every act of these Islamic terrorist groups.
    We are seeing ever greater acts of barbarism from these groups and if they are not directly confronted this malignant force will grow in ever increasing power.

    • sarky

      I thought god was stronger than Satan?
      Not much evidence of it.

      • The Explorer

        Christ called Satan the prince of this world. During the Millennium (on the reading to which I adhere, the time between the First and the Second Coming) Satan is bound. That is, limits have been set on his power. When he is unbound, the resultant evil will bring the world to an end. Only after the Second Coming and the Last Judgement will Satan’s power be destroyed.

        • sarky

          So god will help a christian with a promotion or with a move, he’ll heal a sore leg, guide them on relationships, but when it comes to burning children………….

          • chiefofsinners

            When it comes to burning children God will move His people in every country of the world to highlight the suffering and petition their governments to take action.
            You speak as though no Christian might ever expect to face suffering. You know that’s not true- you are feigning ignorance to make an empty point.

          • sarky

            No I’m not, I’m pointing out how god is apparently visible in the mundane and impotent when it matters.

          • The Explorer

            That God will help with promotions, house moves etc smacks of the Prosperity Gospel or Islam: health and wealth are the mark of God’s favour. It’s not what the New Testament says.

            Behind this seems to lie the view that God (if He existed) has devolved too much responsibility to angels (if they existed) and humans when He should have kept a tighter rein on things. You can take it up with God when you meet Him.

          • chiefofsinners

            Which is pretty much what they said to Jesus on the cross.

          • sarky

            As I thought. A 2000 year old lie.

          • grutchyngfysch

            You are making the error of assuming that the persecution of the Church is in any way a sign of God’s slipping authority. It is not. It is the fulfilment of what the Lord promised would happen: suffering both natural and man-made.

            If Christians condescended to mere materialism, that would no doubt be a source of little but else but misery, but since we do not have so small a view, we know that the present evils are necessary – as the present rebellion is tolerated – before the day when evil and rebellion shall be no more.

          • sarky

            And you’re ok with that? A loving god that allows persecution and misery for his people? You can keep him.

          • grutchyngfysch

            A loving God who was persecuted, tortured and killed for my sake; a God who has conquered death; and a God who has promised to be with His people even unto the end (of both our lives and this age).

            He keeps me, sarky, as He keeps everyone who suffers for His sake.

          • sarky

            A god who has conquered death, a death that he created. As for he keeps you. ..like a pet???

          • grutchyngfysch

            Yes sarky, God conquered the death that was appointed as the just consequence of sin. He didn’t have to conquer it for Himself. He didn’t have to conquer it in order that He might live in paradise or add eternal life to Himself. These things He has possessed since before the beginning.

            He conquered it for mankind’s sake. Indifferent, uncaring, hell-bound man was the recipient of the unmerited grace of Jesus.

            So if you think to prick in me some sense of outrage at being compared to a pet in relation to God, you understand less than nothing. I’m not even as vaunted as a pet next to my Creator: but my God has ransomed me from death. That gap that causes you to sneer – magnify it a thousandfold and a thousandfold again, and you will still not have come close to measuring the height or depth of the love my God has for me.

          • sarky

            ‘Indiffernt, uncaring, hell-bound man’ – why? because of god. god knew the millisecond we were created, what he had in store for us. Don’t give me the stock ‘free will’ answer because it won’t wash, god stacked the odds against us from the start. The tree of knowledge wasnt hidden away it was in plain site. Eve, a being without sin was tempted (although how you tempt a perfect being without sin and therfore unable to even understand temptation, I’ll never understand)
            Your god knew what would happen and allowed it. All the suffering in the world is not down to man, but god and the only way out of suffering is to love and worship thisvain being that caused the suffering in the first place.

            You talk of the love god has for you, please, the best you can hope for is indifference.

          • grutchyngfysch

            The convict blames the Judge, but it is his own crime that led him to the dock. Tell me, mortal man, where will you sit when you judge the Creator of Heaven and Earth?

          • sarky

            I’m sitting in my living room.

          • IanCad

            Perhaps so Chief. Moloch though, is Satan’s prize pupil and although fire is his chosen cruelty, other methods more suited to his worship in this present age serve instead. The abortion clinics know them well.

          • Anton

            Or his best disguise.

          • The Explorer

            How does any of that follow from what I’ve said?

          • sarky

            because satan (If you believe that sort of thing) is very visible, god is invisible.

          • The Explorer

            What’s that got to do with promotions and sore legs? Don’t understand the explanation.

          • preacher

            Hey brother it’s not what we see, it’s the results of men’s actions that shows the spiritual influence behind their minds.
            Good or bad – corrupt & vile, or benevolent & compassionate.
            We live in a World that is currently a battleground & the choice is ours who we serve – it’s called freewill. If God destroyed all the people who oppose Him we would all live in a peaceful World, the downside is we’d all be zombie like robots.
            However God does promise judgement. when the day comes. Just as the allies judged the War criminals of Auschwitz & Belsen.

    • grutchyngfysch

      Spot on Len. The second half of that verse is never more critical: “I came that they may have life and have it abundantly.” (John 10:10)

      The victims of Boko Haram are utterly beyond their power any more. The Islamists are fully within God’s.

  • CliveM

    It’s shocking. But we will do next to nothing as a nation. Which will probably still be more then the EU.

    Why? Because of weakness (what can we do?) and moral cowardice (the voters won’t like it).

    But what should be done? It’s easy to express outrage, but what do people suggest? There are no bodies of children lapping the shores of the Meditteranean. So no anguished media reports and if it was possible for the displaced to trudge or sail their way to Europe, would we want to let them in?

    So we are left, impotent and angry. Blaming the politicians, or the Bishops, or the fates or a non existent God (if you’re an atheist). But the children will go on dying and the women will continue to be raped.

    • IanCad

      No matter how little we do it will be more than we are doing. I’m not yet convinced that all traces of vigour and principle have yet departed this land.
      Unfortunately we have a political system that values the meek, the flexible and the indifference of a TV and sports addled electorate.
      Where are men with voices? Those prepared to raise Ned and hang the consequences? They must be out there somewhere.
      Maybe I’m wrong; but our history is of the ebb and flow of the quality of our leadership. The tide must turn soon.

      • CliveM

        In both 2013 and 14 we sent a small number of military advisors to help “in the fight against Boko Haram”. There where also media rumours that the SAS where to be sent to help (always a reassuring headline for a Prime Minister). So it could be argued that we have given some help. How long they stayed or how effective they where………?

        But there is no strategy, simply a reaction to headlines (the curse of modern politics).

        But, and I ask the question, what should we do? Nigeria hasn’t asked for troops or significant military support. It is one of the most corrupt nations in Africa, so ‘aid’ is likely to disappear into politicians pockets. We won’t be offering space to refugees anytime soon?

        I ask the question, not to be awkward but because I hope someone has an answer.

  • Billo Qasira

    The greater the influence of Islam in our society, the more we condemn future generations in Britain to the fate of non Muslims in Nigeria and Syria.

    • Dreadnaught

      Totally agree; the maxim should be destroy Islam before it destroys you.

  • chiefofsinners

    We admit refugees from Europe, we allow unlimited migration from Europe, trade freely with Europe, pay their citizens benefits, give them our health service, spend 2% of our GDP on defending them and let them make our laws for us.
    Meanwhile in the so-called Commonwealth, there isn’t much wealth and there isn’t much in common.
    Never mind, soon we’ll be able to go cap in hand to Europe and beg them for a temporary, tapered emergency brake on nothing much. Nice work, Dave.

  • David

    I yearn for strong leadership, of a moral and Christian type, to rise up again in this land. Given a period of proper preparation and sound leadership, the peoples of these islands are capable of great things again.
    We are moving through a period of moral decline. The effete media and the soft-skinned establishment are to blame for this corruption and confusion of the people. The tide will turn and real men and real woman, of strength and virtue, guided by good principles, rooted in Christianity, will return.
    We turn to God for wholesome strength – there is no other source.
    “Unless the Lord builds the house, those who build it labour in vain.
    Unless the Lord guards the city, the guard keeps watch in vain” (Ps 127)
    Evil will be defeated by God. But meanwhile sons and daughters must work towards that end.

  • Darter Noster

    When my parents lived in Nigeria in the late 1970s and early 1980s, one of their favourite pastimes was to fly to Kano to spend a few days in that beautiful city in the North. They would walk the historic streets and visit the oldest Mosque in Sub-Saharan Africa. Today, any white westerners visiting Northern Nigeria would be lucky to escape alive. What has changed? Not, fundamentally, the Nigerian people. Those people have become the victims of a cancerous Islamism spreading south across Africa; that same cancerous Islamism which infects everywhere from California to Paris to London and Bradford, and which has its ultimate expression in the fanatical human garbage controlling much of Syria and Iraq.

    We could open our doors to every Nigerian who wished to escape for a better life, but leaving aside the practical questions of how many people Britain and Europe can physically absorb, what would that achieve except to signal a further retreat by the vast mass of humanity in the face of evil? Once humanity has abandoned North Africa and the Middle East to nihilistic evil, will we be any safer? Who is going to take in the European refugees when the new Caliphate takes its war into Europe on a large scale, beyond individual attacks, which it surely will do in time?

    Fight or flight is the question being put to all of humanity by this religion of death; we can either answer it by gradually encouraging entire populations to flee before it, or we can do everything in our power to support those brave souls, of whatever faith or ethnicity, who are prepared to fight the cancer where it stands. These tragic images can either be a call for humanity to flee, or they can be a rallying cry, a banner behind which the civilised world gathers its strength and says “We will not put up with this any more. We will not flee. We will not retreat into gradually shrinking safe havens and leave the perpetrators standing on the field of victory.”

    All our power, ideological, financial and military, should be placed behind the people fighting this evil, because it threatens the entire world. The Nigerian people do not need a refuge; they need friends who can help them take their country back in the name of civilisation.

    “We gave your family temporary refuge” or “We destroyed the monsters who did this to you, and made sure they could never do it again.” Which would you prefer to be that poor child’s legacy?

    • Ivan M

      It is true that the murderers are Islamic but the initial impetus and financing of this version of Islam had its origins in Saudi Arabia, the Gulf and Pakistan.
      (Although there was always propaganda from the Saudis, it really got going after the siege of Mecca in 1979. Encouraged as it was, by the stupidity of the Americans – what is jihadism when you can give the Soviets a bloody nose as Brzezinski would say.) Those countries, or substantial numbers in those regions have not paid any price for spreading terrorism throughout the world. It is getting repetitive, but I’ll say it again, the West principally the US and the UK, have been complicit in this, ignoring it (and latterly encouraging it) when it was directed against the Russians, Indians and the Shiites. The chickens have come to roost as they say. It is possibly self-sustaining now, and will be that much more difficult to eradicate.

      • IanCad

        A first-rate analysis Ivan.

        • Ivan M

          Thank you sir.

      • Anton

        UK has not been a really big player in world politics since Suez, and you have to fight today’s enemy because tomorrow’s could be anybody. But to say that Washington doesn’t get it about Islam is an understatement. I understand that their generals and intelligence services have imams to explain the Muslim mind to them. Given that Islam has a doctrine of taqiyya (deception), they are going to get the worst possible advice. They didn’t employ Marxists to explain communism to them during the cold War, did they? What part of “Fight… until there is no more resistance… and the only faith is in Allah” (Q8:39), and numerous similar verses in which the word ‘fight’ is based on the root qatala (meaning make war on, with intent to kill), do they not understand?

        • Ivan M

          I have to agree about the relative lack of influence of the UK, Anton. Adding to what you wrote, I believe that the US brass were not really fooled, and would like nothing better than to withdraw from their fruitless task of civilising the Muslims.

  • Uncle Brian

    My apologies to His Grace for going off topic, but I’m still hoping to see an update from Carl on Iowa and (next) New Hampshire. Did Cruz beat Trump by a wide enough margin? And what about Rubio’s third place?

  • Albert

    The odd thing of course, is that it is not just that calls are made for the Syrians but not the Nigerians, but that with regard to Syria our policy discriminates against Christians (or at least, it was before Christmas).

    You could be forgiven for thinking it is that the policy discriminates against Christians. And that’s odd, because I think that if you ask people whether they would like a Muslim or a Christian refugee living next to them, the overwhelming majority would say they would prefer the Christian.

    • Old Nick

      Thank you Albert. One problem with looking out especially for the Christians, who are, after all, more likely to get it in the neck from DAESH than Muslims (and who – for those who don’t know – have been in Syria since before there was Islam) is that one is then accused of favouring the imposition of religious tests (along with being asked “how would you tell ?” – a question asked by those who are unaware that the Ottoman milet system worked on religious affiliation – I can remember when you needed a baptism certificate for a visa for Iraq). Added to that the Press are obsessed with the Yezidis, who God knows deserve our sympathy, but who are a good deal less numerous than the various Syrian Orthodox, Syrian Catholics, Melkites, Chaldaeans and Church of the East. I fear that those who run the BBC really are so ignorant about Christianity that they do not want anyone to whisper that Christians are suffering from DAESH because they assume that all Christians are TV evangelists from the Bible Belt (unless they have been specially vetted for being OK, like Canon G. Fraser).

      • Albert

        This is all true, but the problem is that the present policy actually discriminates against Christians. In order to be let in, as I understand it, you have to come from a refugee camp. But Christians have been driven out of those camps. So they can’t get in. But those who drove them out (or who push them overboard in boats)…

        • Old Nick

          I know, Albert. The whole mess is in my prayers. Do you know if representations are being made to HMG or anyone about this poisonous anomaly ? Or might one of the BBC-approved Christians (even Canon Fraser) be suborned into saying a few words in the right places.

          • Albert

            The Cardinal Archbishop of Westminster has been plugging away at this, I think. The Archbishop of Canterbury has raised it in the Lords and with the PM. I don’t know if there has been any change. At the beginning of the crisis the Foreign Office was actually rejecting Christian applicants on the grounds that Christians are not persecuted in the Middle East. Extraordinary.

          • Old Nick

            Thank you. In my mis-spent youth i passed a certain amount of time among the Syrian Orthodox of SE Turkey and have never met more delightful people. They had links southwards across both borders and it is ghastly to see what is happening there.

          • Albert

            How wonderful to have been amongst such ancient Christians! But yes, it must make it all the more painful to see.