welby brexit christmas truce
Democracy

Archbishop of Canterbury urges Brexit Christmas truce

“We go back 103 years, we find at Christmas 1914 there was a ceasefire,” the Archbishop of Canterbury reminded us in a BBC interview from Lambeth Palace. “It would be very good to have a ceasefire from insult and the use of pejorative terms about people at this time,” he suggested.

A Brexit insult truce would be wholesome Christmassy thing to do: peace on earth and goodwill to all men, and all that. The Archbishop continued:

“As a country, we have a future ahead of us. We made a decision about Brexit, that is clear; both sides are saying that. How we do that is a question for robust political argument. But there’s a difference between disagreeing and personalised attacks, and those have to be avoided, because if we’re going to make a success of Brexit – and it’s perfectly possible to do; in fact, we should make a success of it: it gives opportunities as well as challenges – then we need a political leadership that is united in their attitude to the future even if divided on policy. And therefore we do need reconciliation and unity.”

Note his measured optimism; his embrace that Brexit is really happening and (pace a few of his episcopal colleagues) the trajectory is fixed. Justin Welby is fast becoming one of the foremost advocates of a “wide and liberal” (ie Christian and global) Brexit.

But there’s a problem.

Many Church of England parishioners (quite possibly millions of them) are a little frustrated that Brexit is dragging on; indeed, they are beginning to feel somewhat duped and deceived. The Tory ‘rebels‘ or ‘traitors‘ or ‘mutineers‘ (terms which, granted, aren’t very Christmassy) who voted against the Government on Tuesday evening have fielded (and are still fielding) considerable public anger and media fallout. Taking up the Archbishop of Canterbury’s theme on BBC Question Time last night was Nicky Morgan MP:


She was duly answered (/owned) by this Barnsley man:

This vexed chap obviously knows it’s Christmas – peace on earth and goodwill to all men, and all that – but he is not in a truce kind of mood: he is manifestly sick and tired of people like Nicky Morgan, Rebecca Long-Bailey and all those other ‘elites’ who say they “respect the result” of the Referendum but clearly want to negotiate a stitch-up deal which keeps the UK in the Single Market and in the Customs Union and so binds future governments to all present and future EU directives which obviously prevents the “wide and liberal” Brexit which the Archbishop of Canterbury now advocates. Indeed, it wouldn’t be any kind of Brexit at all.

If we are to have a ceasefire from insult and a truce on the use of pejorative terms about people at this time – which is a very laudable and wholly Christmassy objective – don’t we need to reassure angry people that their voices have been heard loud and clear, and that their democratic decision will be respected and fulfilled? Don’t a few recalcitrant bishops and all other obstinately europhile clergy need to get on board the Good Ship Brexit and become instruments of unity and reconciliation, instead of perpetually stoking the anti-Tory, anti-Brexit flames of division and discord? Archbishop, could you please just have a word with your own household before trying to harmonise others?

  • Albert

    What a magnificent fellow from Barnsley. I’ve just been listening to a discussion about all this and a very important point has been made. The differences over Brexit are small. Few people on the Remain side were arguing for a federal Europe or joining the single currency. But that is what Europe is becoming. Thus we’re all Brexiteers really (unless some remainers are not telling the truth of course). So let’s have a truce and then get on with the job.

    • David

      Yes Albert, didn’t he speak so clearly !

      • Busy Mum

        …and threw the women’s smug faces into sharp relief…

  • Martin

    What is wrong with Welby? We were told that there was going to be good disagreement over women in ministry in the CoE and it turned into either you are for women bishops or you are out. Either we keep the pressure up on the traitors in our midst who want to stay in the EU or they will treacherously defeat us.

    Well actually I know what’s wrong with Welby, but it wouldn’t be polite to say.

    • Jilly

      What, that inspirational leader, that towering theological intellectual? That Colossus of conscience and compassion with a razor sharp analytical mind, unswayed by short term populism? That dedicated seeker after Truth? That great Reconciler, loved by so many?
      Oh, hang on … sorry….that was Bishop George Bell.

  • Anton

    Nicky Morgan votes to undermine the PM then says it is about getting the best possible deal? Our politicians really are despicable. I will not desist from saying so just because it is Christmas. I want no truce with people like that.

    • DespiteBrexit

      She is a loathsome creature, although she claims to be a Christian. Was anti-SSM until a red box was waved under her nose.

  • CliveM

    Instead of worrying simply about the tone of debate (although this in important), let’s have a call for a little bit more truth and careful analysis.

    From both sides.

  • David

    I agree with Cranmer on this. If the Remainers had accepted in good faith the clearly expressed democratic opinion of the people, in the greatest democratic exercise we’ve ever seen, instead of constantly carping, spinning, twisting and manoeuvring to undermine Brexit, then there would be no need for this call to a truce.
    Although this reflects a sad state of affairs, given the unending perfidy of the leaders of the Remainer camp, I simply would not trust them enough to agree to a truce – they’d merely use it to spin and undermine elsewhere, or in secret, if not publicly and visibly in the UK. Nothing in the behaviour of the elite can possibly give me any grounds for trusting them one inch.

    • dannybhoy

      There has to be a way by which those who voted “Leave” can register their opinion and force paliament to recognise that the majority of Brits want to leave and not carry on in a ‘ménage à trois’.
      And this is the point, regardless of the various parties position on the EU, The People Have Spoken. If politicians are going to retain any shred of integrity they must put aside their own views and fight for the best possible divorce deal and strategy for building trade deals outside of the EU.
      I have sympathy with the EU in doing everything possible to prevent/punishing us for leaving. They want to dissuade others from following suit, but British politicians need to stop squabbling and being disingenuous..

      • Maalaistollo

        There’s a petition you can sign: https://petition.parliament.uk/petitions/200165 Its terms are as follows: ‘The Government should walk away from the Article 50 negotiations and leave the EU immediately with no deal. The EU looks set to offer us a punishment deal out of spite. Why wait another 18 months when we could leave right away and fully take back control of our country, lawmaking powers and borders?’ It’s already clocked up over 92,000 signatures.

        • dannybhoy

          Thank you, just signed. I don’t really agree with just walking away, as we do have obligations under ‘club rules’, and walking away damages our international reputation. However, on balance petitions rarely say exactly what you think anyway, so if it gives our elected representatives a size twelve boot up their collective backsides, then yes, it’s worth signing…

        • Done

        • Manfarang

          Not that simple. There are all kinds of agreements and obligations that Britain entered into.

          • DespiteBrexit

            Conditional on being part of the EU. Yes, simple.

          • Manfarang

            Negotiating a trade deal with the EU won’t be simple. Operating only under WTO rules will be simple disadvantage.

          • DespiteBrexit

            That’s a different point.

          • Manfarang

            Implementing a new set of import/export regulations is not a simple task neither is setting up a hard border with Ireland.

        • Dominic Stockford

          Done, 94,062.

      • ecclesiaman

        Last nights question time gave the reason why the politicians are holding up, complicating and destroying the Brexit process any way they can. IMO it is a question of Sovereignty. The politicians believe they or parliament have Sovereignty whereas I believe it is the people who have the Sovereignty as celebrated in Magna Carta. The politicians are the elected representatives of the people and they agreed to a referendum which gave a majority in favour of Brexit. This was on a national basis and not on a constituency basis. Therefore remaining constituency MP’s should honour the referendum result. Like others on this and other sites I do not believe there are many MP’s who have any intention of carrying this out. There is a deep state here as well as in the USA. The Donald is trying his best to drain the swamp, although he is far from perfect, but it seems that our equivalent swamp has most of our MP’s being sucked into it by design or ignorance. The EU will not give us a good deal. We will either have a “fudge” satisfying nobody except the EU or with luck have a WTO result which will need the whole country to get behind to make it work. It may not be pretty but I hope in time will yield a better UK.
        I do not want to be a EU poodle nor for the UK to be a colony or a vassal state which is what we appear headed for.

        • dannybhoy

          Yes I agree with your points, but I fear our politicians want to retain the status quo, i.e. pretending to represent the people but actually colluding and canoodling with the movers and shakers they meet by dint of their election to public office.
          And yes I know there are honourable exceptions, but overall to get to the top you have know how to lick boots, do the dirty jobs and have flexible values.
          I would love to see a radical reduction in the numbers and a root and branch reformation if the political system that limits politicians rights to impose dodgy policies on us the people without consultation.

        • Merchantman

          No good talking about Trump to Welby he doesn’t understand how Christians can possibly support him. He doesn’t understand much about much by the look of it.

        • bluedog

          Brexit will be a work in progress. Salami tactics are the order of the day, and the trick is to secure an initial deal that avoids a hostile and united response from the EU. Once formally out we can start to tweak the deal our way over a period of time. The important thing to realise is that once out of the EU it will prove far easier to exploit differences between the EU nations.

          • ecclesiaman

            The EU are asking for the phase one agreement to be put into a treaty. This follows David Davis’s comment that our part of phase one was merely a statement of intent. Eire PM Mr Varadkar wants us to be held tightly to what we have said in phase one. I would like to believe that we could change our relationships if we ever do leave the EU but fear we will be legally bound in the strictest way to the EU although it may not be the same arrangement as heretofore.

          • bluedog

            David Davis needs to stop thinking out loud. Even if phase one is notionally set in stone, there is always scope for renegotiation. Look at the French. Despite being, with Germany, the central core of the EU, they continue to do exactly what they like when it suits them. An important precedent.

    • IanWK

      Brexit is allegedly about the sovereignty of the UK parliament. It’s a bit rich to complain when parliament does something you don’t like!

      • David

        Parliament has no legitimacy other than what the people give to it. Therefore it must respect the people’s decision to Leave.

        • IanWK

          It IS respecting the people’s decision. It’s making sure that the government is subject to parliament, as it should be.

      • Mrs Proudie of Barchester

        Sovereignty lies with the people.

        • Merchantman

          But the blighters have no respect for the people and and unsurprisingly we have none for them; probably the nearest we will get the Welby’s truce is a standoff for the time being!

        • bluedog

          Only when there’s a general election. When the writs are returned and a new parliament sits, the people’s sovereignty transfers to the parliament.

    • francis.marsden

      27% of the UK population voted for Brexit, 37% of the electors. Hardly overwhelmingly “the will of the people”

      • Anton

        It’s a binary issue, and a majority of those who had any will willed to Leave.

        • francis.marsden

          A democracy where the people have no right to change their mind is no longer a democracy.

      • DespiteBrexit

        More than those who voted to leave. Are you going to apply that logic to every general election?

        • francis.marsden

          A General Election can be reversed five years later. This Brexit cannot be reversed probably in our lifetimes. The referendum was advisory not determinative. Where major constitutional change is involved, a two-thirds majority is usually needed in most organizations. Cameron should have insisted upon a higher vote than that by which we entered the EU, at the very least.
          And those who misled the electorate with stories of 80 million Turks immigrating, and £350 million per week for the NHS should be put on trial for misconduct in public office. Then we need to uncover all the alleged links between Russian money, the Leave campaign and Aaron Banks etc.

  • Busy Mum

    “As a country, we have a future ahead of us”

    Do we?

    Geographically speaking, yes.

    • Dominic Stockford

      Frankly, that is a question for God, none of us mere mortals is qualified to answer.

      • Merchantman

        The trouble with the CofE it kind of tells us the official version of what god thinks and how we should respond. god-Erhmm y’know on second thoughts, I might have been wrong about marriage, just thinking I was.

  • Dolphinfish

    I really don’t know what all the fuss is about. The English government is simply telling anyone who asks whatever that particular person wants to hear at that precise moment. That’s why every word coming out of their mouths contradicts every previous word. It should be apparent to even the thickest of Englishmen that the plan is to lie like the proverbial mattress until the time is right to simply renege on any “binding” commitment that doesn’t suit them. The problem with that attitude is that England is the Tottenham Hotspur of nations – a great opinion of itself, but hasn’t done anything much in years. It won’t be allowed to get away with it.

    • Busy Mum

      Even the thickest of Englishmen is quite aware that there is no English government. So even the thickest of Englishmen is not quite so thick as you.

      • Dolphinfish

        Yes, you do have an English government. It sits at Westminster and, in its magnanimity, admits a few unfortunates from the Celtic fringe. These people are tolerated so long as they don’t interfere in matters of state, which is why the DUP has caused such outrage in recent weeks.

        • Anton

          We have to tolerate them voting on purely English matters too.

          • dannybhoy

            Hmmm,
            Blair agreed to Socialist Scotland acquiring home rule on the back of English taxpayers, and English politicians agreed to it..
            So who’s smart and who’s stupid?

          • Busy Mum

            Blair is Scottish….

          • dannybhoy

            Yeah, but he didn’t talk about it much..
            So he may have wanted to do his homeland a favour you think?
            And Boris has Turkish ancestry…
            Should we be worried?

  • len

    Welby has gone for the easy option which is ‘compromise’….once again.

    There are those politicians who wish to give the public the illusion of coming out of the EU but in fact to all intents and purposes remain in the EU.
    This simply will not work and this isn`t what the British public voted for.

  • TropicalAnglican

    For a terrible moment there, I thought I was going to have to listen to Archbishop Justin Welby whine on about Brexit. Thankfully, it turned out to be just a pix, and not a video.
    However, it was still enough to send me scurrying off to look for some cheerful, uplifting pro-Brexit video clips.
    Strangely enough, if you are looking for a well-known pro-Brexit politician who is not Nigel Farage, you’d probably have to turn to a Yank. Trump can probably go rah-rah for Brexit more loudly than all the 650 members of the House of Commons put together.

    You would probably remember this:

    This you would probably not have seen (he held so many rallies that it would be quite a feat to have watched them all):

    PM May, the most powerful Yank in the world is on your side! He’s rootin’ for Brexit!

    Surely that means something to you!

    • Anton

      Theresa May, or May Not.

      • Dominic Stockford

        We should send her tweezers for Christmas, to help with all the splinters….

  • Inspector General

    A truce?

    The Inspector now finds himself in a blood frenzy reading that headline.

    When the enemy begs a truce, that is the time to plunge the knife in and finish
    the job…

    Rhetorically speaking, of course

    {Ahem}

  • Chefofsinners

    The ceasefire if 1914 was agreed by the everyday men on the frontline. Once the Generals found out, they made sure it never happened again.
    Justin Welby might reflect that our social elite will be judged harshly by history if they obstruct the will of the people.

    • David

      My point exactly Chief.

    • Mrs Proudie of Barchester

      A thought. We were taken into the EEC (as it then was) by lies coming from politicians. Politicians were more than happy to cede sovereignty – illegally I might add – to Brussels. Now we expect these self-same politicians to negotiate ‘the best possible deal’ with the EU. Now these politicians – Anna Soubry et al – claim they are upholding Parliamentary sovereignty…and we believe them? I think on thing must happen as a result of this shambolic debacle, and that is a root and branch reform of the way we are governed.

      • Anton

        There used to be a fine man commenting here who called himself 1642 Again…

      • Sourpuss et al have a warped view of Parliamentary sovereignty which they are twisting to suit their agenda, most people know this and are pretty hacked off. They don’t believe them.

  • bluedog

    It must be acutely embarrassing for ++Welby to realise that his instincts, and those of his fellow archbishop and most of the rest of the episcopacy, were completely wrong with regard to Brexit. Will his political self-confidence ever recover? It’s hard to see why it should.

    • ecclesiaman

      He does say some good things but he ruins it with so many bad ones. Unfortunately his ecclesiastical gaffs are more serious and he would be given room in any scriptural church.

  • Mike Stallard

    Mr Davis and Mrs May are heading for a real stitch up. We can remain within the EU, cough up as much as we are ordered and be ready to be dragged kicking and screaming into the Eurozone (like all the other 27 “states”) while having absolutely no representation at all.

    Mr Corbyn is not saying anything much and when he does he is saying contradictory things.

    People are very angry and rightly so. Christmas? No Xmas is Santa’s Birthday!

    We need to swallow our pride now. We need to join EFTA and remain within the EEA, free of the ECJ, the CAP, the CFP and able to make any trade deals with anyone we care to. We will also pay a lot less into the EU as well. Oh – and while we are there we can work towards complete independence from the New Constitution of Spinelli/Bertelsmann.

    Fat chance!

  • Dreadnaught

    “If voting made any difference they wouldn’t let us do it.”
    ― Mark Twain

    • Anton

      It’s a great quote, but nobody has found it in Twain’s writings or an attribution to him in conversation by somebody present.

      • Dreadnaught

        I must admit I took it on face value only.

        • Anton

          Wikiquote is nowadays pretty comprehensive and requires that all quotes be sourced. If I had a pound for every false Einstein quote I’d be a rich man.

          • Dreadnaught

            Whom ever said it was pretty much on the ball. Thanks for the reference.

  • francis.marsden

    Maybe Brexit is God’s punishment upon Britain for its godlessness. To be cut off from the European mainstream, be at odds with our 27 neighbours – many of whom have much stronger Christian traditions than we do. What will we become? An insignificant small country squeezed by the big global power blocs? A poorer, isolated neo-Marxist republic? Or riven by riots and social strife as the poor become poorer and the Tories and their mates grow wealthier in a deregulated economy, where worker’s rights and environmental protections are scrapped, to allow offshore billionaires to make fortunes? Is this just the calm before the storm?

    • Anton

      On the contrary; maybe Brexit is punishment on the Continent for its godlessness.

      • Royinsouthwest

        Or maybe it is a punishment for both Britain and the EU.

    • magnolia

      And maybe pigs are fluorescent green with yellow stripes and wing swiftly (with six wings) through the air on Christmas eve carrying Father Christmas to all corners of the globe. in place of the reindeer…

      ….But no…..

      Portugal, Italy, Greece and Spain (other PIGS) have probably a higher % of believers but have suffered much, and look set to suffer more.

      The EU elite does not greatly love Christians. Look at the % of atheists we sent out to be Commissioners, for a start….Look at the Club of Rome…Look, look, look…

    • IrishNeanderthal

      Brexit does seem, at present, to be going pear-shaped.

      Maybe Nigel Farage really did do a deal with the Devil.

    • David

      The EU is at bottom an anti-Christian, godless political empire. Indeed its very constitution denies Europe’s only commonality, its Christian heritage. It promotes Humanism as a substitute for Christianity. I say in jest, have you been asleep these last four decades ?

      • Anton

        Institutional Christianity is not Europe’s only commonality. It has two roots and the other is ancient Greece.

        • David

          Indeed, but I would argue that it is Christianity that has had by far the greatest overall impact in fashioning the west.

          • Dodgy Geezer

            I would argue that it is the Industrial Revolution….

          • Anton

            It is a huge change, but it is a consequence of the West not a formative factor upon it, and it is one that is more readily exportable than others. Arguably (pace Alan Macfarlane) its emergence in England rather than elsewhere in the West was not a coincidence either, and I mean not only geology but society.

          • David

            The Industrial Revolution was an economic result of, an effect, flowing from cultural changes not a prime cause in itself.

          • Dodgy Geezer

            Oh? What cultural changes?

            You have it arse-about-face. The Industrial Revolution CAUSED lots of cultural changes – movement from the land to the factories, for one thing, the increase in middle-class consumer items, sudden wealth in the North, faster travel… unless you think that everybody suddenly moved into factoriues and said “What shall we do now… I Know! Let’s have an Industrial Revolution…”.

            The Industrial Revolution was caused by the application of increased scientific knowledge. Unless you’re going to claim that Savery, Newcomen and Watt had a cultural change when they invented steam engines, I can’t see that culture had any place in causing the period in question…

          • David

            Confusion due to different definitions here, of culture that is.
            I am using the anthropological understanding of culture, which includes technologies, indeed includes the entire sum of a peoples understanding. You are using the narrower idea of culture being something separate from science and technology.

            The cultural changes comprising greater knowledge of, and crucially application, of science led to the Industrial (and Agricultural ) Revolution, coupled with the right economic and social conditions. That in turn then led to the far reaching social, economic and of course scientific and technological changes that ensued.

          • Anton

            Institutional Christianity.

      • francis.marsden

        Schumann, Adenauer, Monnet and other prime movers behind the original Treaty of Rome were all Christians. The motivation was not primarily economic, but after two terrible world wars, to draw the European nations together into a peaceful confederation, and avoid any further war.
        Just as our Parliament is now overwhelmingly secular and threatens the rights of Christian believers in many ways, so too in Brussels, regrettably, the secularists have the upper hand.
        The UK, despite its established Anglican/Presbyterian settlement, has one of the lowest churchgoing rates in Europe. We may end up more secularist and anti-Christian outside the EU than inside. The EU needs a Christian fight back from Poland, Slovakia, Hungary, Romania, Bulgaria, Greece, Italy, Portugal, Ireland, etc. to combat the secularism of France, Netherlands, Scandinavia & Co.

        • Anton

          The motivation… to draw the European nations together into a peaceful confederation, and avoid any further war was provided not by the self-aggrandising EU, but by the common enemy of the Soviet Union, which without the NATO alliance and the US nuclear umbrella would have invaded us.

          • francis.marsden

            Certainly NATO defended us against the Soviet threat. But the fact remains that a major motivation behind the Treaty of Rome was to ally France and Germany in such a way as to prevent a further conflict between them.
            Many European nations, who felt the scourge of war even more heavily than Britain (because they suffered occupation), still see the EU partly in such terms. It is the Brits, in their materialistic way, who tend to see it solely in economic terms for “What can we get out of it? How much must we put into it?”

          • Anton

            Most Brits know full well that it will cost us to come out of the EU but we want our sovereignty back. So How can you possibly say that we see it in economic above political terms?

          • francis.marsden

            And what are you going to do with your much vaunted sovereignty? Put it in a picture frame on the living room wall and stare at it? Build a statue of it? Say your prayers to it? I wouldn’t trust our current cartload of Parliamentary plonkers with our “national sovereignty” anyway. Too likely to sell us out to hedge fund managers, media billionaire, merchant banks, offshore tax havens and money launderers.

            Brussels was a good balance to counter the wilder fantasies of some Westminster politicians (capitalist or neo-Marxist!), and keep us within a reasonable international consensus – some parts of which you and I both dislike, but, I believe, better than nothing. Those checks and balances will disappear after Brexit.

            In today’s globalized world, no nation-state is fully “sovereign.” We depend upon our neighbours and others for trade and all sorts of cooperation. Small nations end up pushed around by the big multinational companies, and by their more powerful neighbours. That is what is likely to happen to us, outside the EU.

            Rupert Murdoch, our powerful Australian billionaire media controller, has said that when he goes to Downing St., they do what he tells them. When he goes to Brussels, they reply: “And who are you?” and ignore him. No wonder he pushed Brexit.

        • David

          I share your understanding of the drift of the EU and UK from a Christian supporting heritage to present secularism. That is well documented.

          But where is your evidence, how would staying within the EU possibly check our descent into secularism ? Do you have knowledge of the countries you mention and if so, how would they influence us ? Because of the power of the English language we simply are not influenced culturally by the more faithful eastern, Visegrad group, mores the pity – because the programs and films flow from west to east. As for Italy, Portugal and Ireland my impression there is that they are as secular as we are, except perhaps in the deep south of Italy.
          The fightback is coming from the global south, I’d say with their missions to the UK.

          • francis.marsden

            I agree with you about the Global South – you can see that Nigerian, Filipino and Syro-Malabar immigrants have a much more lively Chrsitian faith which they are zealous to spread.
            I lived six years in Italy, a year in Ukraine, and speak Italian, Ukrainian, Russian, Polish to some extent, German and several other languages. The Brits are very insular and linguistically poor compared to many European nations. I have visited every EU country bar Malta!

            The general level of religious awareness is much higher in Italy, Portugal, Spain etc than in the UK., largely because of the Catholic influence. Irish church attendance is still around 40% weekly, though much lower in Dublin, Limerick etc. I remember Romanian friends being astonished that many churches in England are closed because of theft. They said it was inconceivable in their country that anyone should steal from a church.

            Germany, for instance, has a Constitutional Court which for a long time (until the accession of the East) restricted considerably any legalization of abortion.
            Britain allows things like embryo experimentation and the creation of human animal hybrids, which are outlawed in most European countries. We are a bit of a rogue state when it comes to experimentation on human beings in the embryo stage.
            On the other hand, in opposing euthanasia we have done pretty well compared with the death merchants of Holland and Belgium.
            So it is a mixed picture: western culture is as you say, damaging the Christian heritage of the eastern nations, and you can see Poland in particular fighting back.

          • David

            Can’t say I agree with all that. Brits are not in the least bit insular, often having a far more global view than others. Indeed we have gone almost everywhere ! But yes we are linguistically lazy relying on already having made English a world language.
            I appreciate your claims of greater religious awareness relies on your personal experience and residency in the countries you cite, and I don’t doubt your personal experience, but it doesn’t chime with my understanding, admittedly based on mainly written accounts. Interestingly I hear from police, verbally, that many of the lead thefts from our local churches involve eastern european gangs. But PC ensures that this is not made available for public consumption.
            We both admire the determination of the Visegrad nations to resist the globalists attempts to destroy western culture, especially through migration from non-Christian heritage countries and of course, secularism.

          • francis.marsden

            I suppose that like Portugal our interest has usually been towards the ultramar, beyond the seas. But that has left us very much confined to the Anglophone sphere – nations once in the Empire which now are creating their own futures and don’t need us.

          • David

            Well there’s no free lunch. But freed of the bureaucratic, slow moving EU empire which tries for the impossible, namely pleasing the conflicting demands of many nations, we will, I’m sure, be able to grasp the many opportunities for global trade. As for “confined to the Anglophone sphere”, I find that an amusing and very dated idea, as English is now a world language. Of course we must ensure we have good products to sell, as we do.

  • Dodgy Geezer

    The Church often has a lot of nasty things to say about Satan and Mammon. Surely at Christmas-time, which is reverting to a pagan feast of Bacchus, we could have a bit of a truce and embrace our esteemed colleagues in the Infernal Hierarchy?

  • Terry Mushroom

    Peace on earth to men of good will. Or goodwill to all men?

    There’s a difference. My Bible says the first sentence.

  • betteroffoutofit

    Thank you, Your Grace, for the Barnsley clip!!! Bein’ a lass of that ilk misen, it war a reit pleasure to ‘ear them voices at after all these years. Never used to think I’d say a thing like that, of course, but years of Old English have opened my ears as well as my eyes 🙂

    Indeed, I got so involved in that discussion I forgot to look at ++Welby’s face. Nowadays, the wear and tear in evidence among the up-so-down elite leads me to wonder – ‘What happens to these people (e.g.T’reaon May) once they’re in office?’

    Today, though — well, whatever else happened to the ABC? —
    Did he get biffed in the phizzog? Did somebody put poisonous spiders in his luggage? Or what?

  • disqus_5FxF9H1HiV

    Well of COURSE ++Justin is trying to elbow his way into the limelight by using two leading news topics – Brexit and Christmas – together: anything to avoid facing up to the pasting the CofE got in the Carlile Review of the George Bell affair.