Age UK Christian car sticker2
Freedom of Religion

Age UK: Christian stickers might invalidate car insurance policies

 

Admittedly, the Rev’d Wena Parry’s mobile insignia is not of the same order of subtlety as your average ‘Jesus ♥ You’ bumper sticker. But who is to judge? If religious logos and personalised branding now constitute modifications which must be declared to an insurer, has Jesus become turbo-charged? Does soteriology compare to transmission modification? Is the gospel to be equated with revved-up exhaust improvements, alloy wheels or bespoke spoilers?

These questions must be gnawing away at Wena Parry’s consciousness, for she has been told by Age UK that “These modifications do not fit our acceptance criteria for motor insurance and cover would have been declined if we had been made aware of these at the time of purchasing your policy.”

Apparently, the Rev’d Wena had tried to make a claim after “a part was stolen”. We are not told which part, but presumably these modifications did not render her car at greater risk of accident or greater risk of theft, which are the usual sorts of modifications that insurers insist (quite reasonably) must be disclosed. Indeed, such a bold profession of faith might arguably decrease the risk of having an accident, for (by faith) her guardian angel might watch over her a little more assiduously in order to facilitate her motorised gospel sandwich-board. If anything, her car has been manifestly devalued by this catechistic customisation, to the extent that no car thief would touch it with a slim-jim or a slide-hammer. Her premium ought, therefore, to be reduced. A sticker declaring ‘Christ For Me’ is a declaration of faith without monetary value: it is a cosmic sat-nav; not an in-car multimedia screen so beloved of boy racers.

Naturally, Age UK have denied that the threat to withdraw Rev’d Wena’s policy had anything to do with her faith. A spokesman said: “The situation regarding Rev Parry’s claim was in no way related to the Christian nature of her graphics.”

This, with respect, is a daft assertion. If the Rev’d Wena Parry lived in (say) Tower Hamlets or in any other proclaimed ‘Islamic zone’ where ‘sharia law’ operates, her car might very well become more prone to vandalism. But in Cymmer, Neath Port Talbot, Wales?

Age UK must now urgently clarify what vehicle ‘modifications’ expressing personal/religious identity need to be disclosed in order to guarantee insurance validity. Must a Sikh driver declare a khanda pendant hanging from the interior mirror? Must a Muslim driver declare the presence of a ‘Bismillah Ta Arabisch‘ sticker or a hanging ‘Allah Swt’/’ayatul Surat Al-falaq‘? Must an LGBT driver declare a ‘Gay Pride Rights Rainbow Car Aerial Ball Antenna‘? Must the Conservative Party warn their members that displaying a ‘Honk for Change‘ car sticker might invalidate their insurance (especially in Liverpool, East Ham and Rhondda)?

We look forward with great interest to the reading the reviewed wording on Age UK insurance policy applications.

  • DanJ0

    I always give cars with Christian bumpers stickers of fish symbols a wide berth just in case the Rapture happens.

    • CliveM

      Well that gave me a laugh!

    • Shadrach Fire

      More likely a rupture in the inner tube than the Rapture!

    • William Lewis

      Made me chuckle. 🙂

    • Anton

      It will, but not when the pre-tribbers think…

  • carl jacobs

    OK, so let’s think charitably for a moment and assume this doesn’t have anything to do with religious discrimination – because it almost surely doesn’t. It’s an insurance company, and insurance companies don’t care about people as individuals. They care about statistical profiles. So we must ask ourselves “Why would stickers involve a modification that an insurance company would care about?” Well, perhaps applied stickers might indicate that the car was being used as a business vehicle and not just a personal vehicle. One can imagine those two uses having different rates. And that’s exactly the kind of thing an insurance company wants to know.

    • James60498 .

      You are being very charitable Carl. If she is a Reverend then she is almost certainly covered for that work.

      For this not to be the case, then unless she claimed to have another car for her work and promised not to use this one, then she must have lied during her application

      I am afraid that neither of these sound as likely as discrimination.

      And if the reports are to be believed then it is the modifications that they are objecting to, not the use.

      You are either being extremely charitable or extremely ironic

      • carl jacobs

        James

        The modification must alter the risk associated with the car in some way. Applications do not alter risk. Otherwise insurance companies would prohibit bumper stickers. People however do modify cars with appliques that advertise a small business. I see them all the time. It has to be something like this. I will tell you what this isn’t. This isn’t a case of “She’s a Christian so we won’t insure her.” That’s just paranoia. This has something to do with how modifications change the categorization of the car.

      • CliveM

        I think one of the possible problems is that she simply didn’t realise these stickers amounted to modifications. Have to admit I wouldn’t of.
        So I can see this situation arising with no deliberate intention to deceive by either side.

        • James60498 .

          I agree with you that it MAY be a modification and certainly this could be done without any intention to mislead by either side.

          My dispute was with Carl’s suggestion that she was using it for business without insurance. I think that somewhat difficult to argue.

          • carl jacobs

            James

            It was an hypothetical explanation – an example of how to view this problem. Nothing more. Don’t look for the motivation in religious persecution because that isn’t where the answer will be found.

          • CliveM

            Yes I agree with that. I suspect if it had been bumper size none of this would have been a problem.

          • CliveM

            And provided HG has got his facts right, it’s not what the insurer appears to be arguing either.

      • Being American, Carl is never ironic – accept unwittingly.

        • The Explorer

          Mark Twain was American. He was ironic. Henry James was American, after a fashion.

          • Mark Twain was influenced by the nearest of Haley’s Comet shortly before his birth.

            Henry James? He was a cultural mongrel and ‘confused’ about many areas of life..

          • The Explorer

            I’ll grant you James. But Twain was still an American, comet or no comet.

          • How about: an exception that proves the rule – because of the comet?

          • The Explorer

            Let’s get Linus to arbitrate. He’s good on cultural stuff.

          • There is no need for arbitration. Besides, Jack will have ‘offended’ Linus by his observations on Henry James. Plus, he’s French (on his father’s side).

          • The Explorer

            Yes, Avi would be perfect. He has a sound perspective on Americans.

          • Agreed then. Meantime, Jack’s position holds until Rabbi Avi gives his judgement.

          • carl jacobs

            Tried to influence your choice of judge, I see.

          • Shouldn’t you be watching the Super Bowl ………

          • carl jacobs

            I am watching the Super Bowl. The Patriots just converted. Minute to go before half.

          • How can “a minute” last 15 minutes? Good touchdown, though.

          • carl jacobs

            Clock management

          • Another touchdown ………. exciting game.

          • carl jacobs

            This half-time show is criminally bad. And my wife is making me watch it. Dancing, singing sharks. Just shoot me now ….

          • Lol ……… women.

          • carl jacobs

            A little background. The star of the half-time show was Katy Perry. That opening song (the one sang from the back of the crystal cat) is called “Roar.” The lyrics contain a lot of references to big cats. The Cincinnati Bengals (notice the name of a big cat), like most football teams, play songs prior to the game when the teams come on the field. In 2013, they chose “Roar” as one of the songs they would play. And they played it. Once. The visiting fans of the rival Pittsburgh Steelers laughed so hard, and the fans of the Bengals were so humiliated, the Bengals never played it again.

            Chick songs just don’t mix with football.

          • Katy Perry – please, please keep her in America. “A sign of the times”, as we Catholics say.

          • carl jacobs

            The half-time show seems more and more pagan every year. One the other hand, the commercials have been better this year. Although there is an underlying theme of Babel in them.

          • City of the Plains, next year then.

          • Building to an exciting conclusion ….

          • So, off to bed.
            What was wrong with that last call?

          • carl jacobs

            Short yardage with alot of time and a time out remaining. Seattle should have given the ball to Marshawn Lynch to smash it it. He was running well. Patriots weren’t having much success stopping him. The theory, I’m sure, was “That’s what they expect.” But you can always second-guess calls that don’t work.

          • Who is that little No 24 playing for Seattle? Playing like a Man U. midfielder.

          • carl jacobs

            Marshawn Lynch. He’s one of the premiere running backs in the NFL. Known for his difficult relationship with the media. He has been fined several times essentially for not being cooperative. The personality of the team is Richard Sherman (25). He is one of the two best cornerbacks in the league and quite the character. The other is Darryl Revis who plays for the Patriots.

          • Cressida de Nova, then? She is European so will be unbiased.

          • carl jacobs

            You have no shame.

          • So says the man who earlier in the day attempted to blackmail Happy Jack into making a heretical statement.

          • carl jacobs

            Does Jack have a guilty secret?

          • A secret? Haven’t we all?. Guilt? No. Disclosure could put him at a temporary disadvantage though.

          • carl jacobs

            I’ll keep your secret, Jack. Probably.

          • ““The greatest way to live with honour in this world is to be what we pretend to be.”
            (Socrates)

          • Cressida de Nova

            Yes unbiased c’est moi. I judge Carl to be a humourless windbag and a Francophobe. If I were Linus or Danjo I would be accusing you by now of showing an unwholesome interest in me…but I’m not. I know you to be a pure Catholic lad and I’m sure you don’t fancy either of those poofs in spite of what they both say !

          • Good show, Cressida. Happy Jack knew he could rely on you for an impartial ruling.

            Ah, yes, Linus and Danjo. In need of sound fatherly discipline and advice, yet both confuse this with a sexual interest. They are injured and trapped.

            It’s a syndrome well known to Happy Jack. Boys growing up under the parenting of a weak, neglectful, or absent father with strong, dominant mothers. It harms their potential masculinity and manhood and they develop signs of effeminacy and despise women and harbour unclean desires for men. .

          • avi barzel

            The Canadian perspective of the US is from the perspective of a flea sleeping beside an elephant with a twitch. Hardly unbiased.

          • avi barzel

            Uh-uh, stayin’ outa this one.

        • carl jacobs

          We make up for it by being right all the time.

          • Do not let the fortuity of 100+ ‘up votes’ on the Spectator blog go to your head, Carl. Remember. you are only as good as your last post.

          • carl jacobs

            Jack

            Up-votes are gratifying to the ego. But they don’t necessarily indicate the quality of a comment.

          • You are correct there, Carl. Mind you, the comment Jack referred to was rather good.- for an American, that is.

        • carl jacobs

          Would that use of “accept” be unwitting irony?

          • Ummm … remember the line: “Life is a state of mind” ?

  • Shadrach Fire

    Another amusing but sad post on the way society is going crazy. Are we to be ashamed of the Gospel? Would this ‘modification’ apply to a company car with company branding. Wena Parry’s ‘mods’ are no more than the branding of her employer.

  • Inspector General

    If it’s for commercial considerations, then let it be. A good friend of the Inspector, who spends a fortune following the motor racing (Over a hundred pounds a day, when last asked, and that was in the 1990s) once came back with a mischievous bumper sicker “Keep Back – Paedophile Staff Car”. Shouldn’t think even paedophiles would want to display that thing for the unwanted attention it might bring.

    Similar considerations are made for life insurance customers who tick the ‘can swim’ box and who unknowingly pay higher premiums for it. This down to the well known fact that it is always swimmers who drown, not non swimmers…

  • DanJ0

    Perhaps she is being lumped in with ‘boy racers’, another group who are inclined to put decals down the side of their cars.

    • sarky

      Thats exactly it! Having worked in motor insurance in a previous life ‘decals’ were an indication of risk and therefore listed under modifications. The policy wording doesnt discriminate between the type of decal, which is how this lady has fallen foul.
      This isn’t a ‘everbody hates christians’ event, just a company repudiating a claim based on following the policy wording to a tee.

      • Inspector General

        Used to run an old British motorcycle. A years insurance was £ twenty something. Cheaper than a month using the buses at the time…

        Forgot to mention, there was more chance of it being picked up and heaved into a skip by youths on the lark rather than it actually being stolen or even damaged…

        • Johnnyrvf

          Being a repairer of old British bikes, it must have been something like a knackered Bantam or (shudder) a Norton Jubilee, in which case they would be doing the owner a favour.

          • Inspector General

            An Enfield Bullet…

            God save the Queen !!

          • Johnnyrvf

            I had a couple of those Enfields, Bullet and a Constellation. I managed to blow both of them up…………

          • Inspector General

            Oh Lord, no…

          • bluedog

            I learned to ride on a knackered Bantam 125. Shaved head, clip on bars and alloy guards, quite the Ace Café look.

          • Inspector General

            and skid lid?

          • bluedog

            Yep, often enough to be alive to tell the tale. Started off with a Stadium Project 4, mostly recently its an Arai Corsair.

          • Inspector General

            Having seen venerable old examples, I’m sure some of them were WW2 British paratroop issue. One recalls the image on his box of airfix model soldiers of that ilk. 1 in 72 scale if one remembers correctly…

          • Johnnyrvf

            Actually so did I, which is why after serving an apprenticeship working on er foreign makes, my mind was opened to other perspectives of Motorcycle design preferable to WW2 German design.

        • DanJ0

          I used to ride a lovely Harley but he left after a couple of years.

          • Inspector General

            {vomits}

  • The Explorer

    Reduced risk of theft (as HG points out) and increased risk of vandalism were my two immediate reactions on seeing the photo.
    HG (paragraph 5) points out that Revd Parry is living in Wales, not Tower Hamlets. But suppose she DID live in Tower Hamlets and wanted that logo? What then?

    • carl jacobs

      Explorer

      Increased risk of vandalism in the aggregate? C’mon. How many cars can you identify that have been vandalized for displaying a political or personal message? Remember that insurance companies care about aggregates. They don’t care about individuals at all.

      • The Explorer

        I know from when I moved house and paid less insurance for the same car in my new location, that it varies according to where you live, whether or not the car is garaged etc.
        So I suppose you could declare your logo and pay a higher/reduced premium for it depending on whether it’s a high or low risk area for that particular message. That could be the direction in which we, as a society, are moving.

        • carl jacobs

          Explorer

          Where you live can be correlated with events like car theft, and burglary, and drunk driving – significant events in the life an insurance salesman. The garage is an indicator of a certain level of affluence. So those indicators all make sense to me in terms of insurance rates. But unless your insurance company asks you about the political message you might put on your car, you can be confident they don’t care about it. If they thought it was a risk factor, they would ask.

          We are so quick to find discrimination and persecution where it doesn’t exist. Is a Christian inconvenienced? “It’s discrimination!” No, it’s an insurance company being an insurance company.

          • The Explorer

            I’m sure you’re right. It actually wouldn’t have occurred to me as being an issue until HG’s post.

      • Inspector General

        One understands with the UK insurance industry, it’s your post code that defines much of the risk you present. The Inspector’s is GL1 ***, which is not that bad when you consider the appalling areas that blight large inner cities…

    • Uncle Brian

      Even people who live in Wales are allowed to drive their cars in Brick Lane if they want to, aren’t they?

      • The Explorer

        Heard the controversy about no-go areas in Britain?
        Her Welshness wouldn’t be the issue; the religious message would be.

  • The Explorer

    There was a case in the States of a black woman who reported her car vandalised by white youths.
    However, someone had filmed the damage. It showed her trashing her own car.
    The white youths were still found morally guilty. If it hadn’t been for them, she wouldn’t have felt the need to do it.

    • Uncle Brian

      You’ve got me baffled there, Explorer. What does “morally guilty” mean in this context? What were they supposed to have done?

      • Satire, Brian.

      • The Explorer

        They were guilty of existing. They aroused in her the thought of what they might do; so she took pre-emptive action.
        I’m hazy about the details, but it was an actual case. The Duke University lacrosse team who were falsely accused of rape and had their future careers ruined as a result are another instance of the same sort of thing.

  • Sam

    Well this could also be an insurance company trying to deny a claim on a policy wording technicality, rather than specific anti Christian bias…it would be interesting to see if ecclesiastical would have insured this revs car, with the stickers and all.

    • Happy Jack agrees with you. This more likely a technicality being used to dodge meeting a claim.

      The insurers Ageas Insurance Limited had investigated the sale of
      her policy and she may have a way of claiming if the company were unclear about conditions.

      Age UK have said a review was undertaken: and concluded: ” … that our request to declare all modifications was not made clear enough to Rev Parry and therefore she did not know which vehicle enhancements should have been declared … They say they will review the wording on their policy applications.”

      Anyway, how do we know the offending modification was not the additional cigarette lighter point in the boot of the car?

      • Sam

        Ah dude,

        Once upon a time I worked as an underwriter of corporate insurance, until I discovered better things to do in my life, I had fantasies of setting up my own syndicate, with some cat bonds,focusing on the liability sector. I was going to name it Samuel’s liability indemnity partnership….. or slip. The other master plan was to do captive insurance and idle my time on the beeches of Bermuda or Israel and do some surfing.

        • Anton

          Surfing in the Med??

        • Hi Sam

          cat bonds? That’d be like people who’ve got cats?

          • Sam

            Hannah

            No, no nothing to do with cat owners. It’s short hand for catastrophe bond. Practically all insurers will buy insurance for their book, called reinsurance ,from reinsurance companies to spread the risk and have capacity to insure more than they would be able. The cat bond is an alternative or supplement to this for catastrophe risks (things that only specialized insurers would take on and if you insured would have a massive payout, but which don’t occur all the time “high risk, low severity” ). They’ve been done for things like hurricanes and earthquakes , but in principle can be done to most insurance risks.

            They work by selling bonds to investors and like most bonds they have a coupon (the interest) but the coupon is determined by the risk being insured. So say I’m the insurer and I’m able to cover £100 million and I buy reinsurance for another £100 million, but I want to cover £300 million in risk, I’d sell £100 million bonds and the coupon is 10% if there are no claims triggered, say they’re 1 year bonds,then the investors get £110 million back. If there is a large claim during those 12 months, in this example when my capacity and the reinsurance is reached, i.e. the claim(s) goes above £200 million then the £100million of cat bonds is used to pay the remainder of the claim, rather than being paid back to the investors in full.

  • Albert

    I wonder if Christians cost insurers less money by having fewer accidents or less severe accidents. After all, there is plenty of evidence that says that religious believers live healthier lives, so it may be that that transfers into safer drivers.

    • Dominic Stockford

      George Whitefield was a famously dangerous driver of carriages!

      • Albert

        Come to think of it, Pope Paul VI was a sucker for speedy driving. However, I think it is down to him that the Catholic Church has a specific teaching on speed:

        2290 The virtue of temperance disposes us to avoid every kind of excess: the abuse of food, alcohol, tobacco, or medicine. Those incur grave guilt who, by drunkenness or a love of speed, endanger their own and others’ safety on the road, at sea, or in the air.

        • Jack thought “speed” referred to the use of amphetamines.

      • The very first case of road rage occurs in the Bible:
        ‘ The driving is like that of Jehu the son of Nimshi, and he is driving furiously!’ (2 Kings 20).

    • Shadrach Fire

      One would expect Christians to have less accidents but do they? I am always very careful when doing business with a Christian.

      • sarky

        Quite right. Had a christian friend of my parents do some work on my car!!! Totally ripped me off, charged me £400 for work he hadn’t even done.
        paid him a visit and got it back though!!!!

    • Anton

      Quite possibly, but bear in mind that some 50% of the population put “Christian” on the census forms but never go to church except perhaps at Christmas and certain never pray in their own words.

      • Albert

        Quite. I would measure it, the way they measure things like health – do people practise their faith, by attending worship regularly?

        • Anton

          I don’t consider that that was a good register of faith in mediaeval times…

          • Albert

            What would you count, then?

          • Anton

            Good question, and one not answered definitively before heaven. My own rule of thumb would be anybody who prays regularly to the Creator through Jesus Christ and using their own words.

          • Albert

            Good question, and one not answered definitively before heaven.

            A bit difficult for an insurer to do that!

            My own rule of thumb would be anybody who prays regularly to the Creator through Jesus Christ and using their own words.

            Why their own words?

    • sarky

      We will never know……religion is not a question asked on the proposal form.

      • The Explorer

        Forms, of course, can change. Forms that used to have ‘Father’ and ‘Mother’ now have ‘Parent 1′ and Parent 2’.

  • Linus

    Isn’t there some kind of insurance rule that states if branding or political messages cover more than a certain amount of the bodywork on a car, it is no longer considered as a private vehicle for insurance purposes?

    I’m pretty sure this rule applies to all vehicles carrying conspicuous logos or slogans, be they religious in nature or not. I think the idea is that such vehicles attract more attention than private vehicles and are therefore significantly more prone to damage.

    If this is the case then there’s no religious discrimination taking place here. Insurers have the right to demand premiums based on risk assessment, and if vehicles carrying conspicuous slogans and brands are more at risk than those that do not, it’s perfectly reasonable of them not to pay out on the basis that Ms Perry did not correctly identify the category of vehicle to be insured when she took out her policy.

  • Here’s a good summary of how insurance premiums can be effected by various vehicle modifications, including appearance.

    http://www.moneysupermarket.com/car-insurance/blog/car-modifications-car-insurance-prices/

    Specialised Paint Work – 15%
    Stripes, Decals and Badges – 9%

    Q: Does one have to inform one’s car insurer of body decoration and/or decal vinyl stickers?
    A: Yes. They may say its fine and not class it as a modification. Others will class it as a modification.

    • Demon Teddy Bear

      That’s useful – thank you.

    • david lawton

      must admit – I did not see you post untl after I posted mine. just shows its not being anti Christian.

  • MartinWW

    As a Christian, I don’t object to the sentiment at all. However, I do not think it is a good thing to place it so prominently on the car, for the simple reason that it sets a precedent for other religions (you know the one I mean) to do the same in this and other blatant ways. I hope this little venture is stifled by the insurance industry. A message in small font in the rear window should suffice.

    • carl jacobs

      It doesn’t have anything to do with the message, or religion for that matter. She placed herself into the category of “people who put decals on their car.” The insurance company has evidently decided that certain behaviors correlate with putting decals on a car. Those behaviors require the company to carry additional risk. That’s all there is to this. Both parties were acting in good faith. The driver because she equated to decal with a bumper sticker. The insurance company because it was just enforcing the terms of the policy.

      • Leacock

        What is the difference between a decal and a bumper sticker aside from location? I really don’t see why it would be a problem. If anything I would be inclined to view the decal user as a safer risk, because they tend to be advertising something and so would logically be more likely to drive defensively.

  • I would say that rear view mirror dangling islamic artifacts obscuring the mohammedan drivers view are far more prevalent and dangerous.
    We won’t go there though. Don’t want any AK47 hissy fits now do we?

    • It’s fairly common nowadays for people to have all sorts dangling from their rear view mirrors. It’s an issue for the traffic police, surely?

  • I wonder whether the driver has to disclose how they dress. After all, I would suggest that a female wearing a burqa with only a slit for vision would have severely restricted side vision, something that would, if occurring naturally in the eye, cause one to be banned from driving.

    • Inspector General

      Rather think such a lady would be given the Islamic hiding of her life when her Mohamed finds out she’s been behind a wheel…

      • I only asked because an acquaintance was a witness to an accident involving a woman wearing a burqa. The woman apparently then locked herself in the car and wouldn’t move till her husband arrived. The police weren’t impressed by my acquaintance’s statement in which he described the woman as having her entire head covered by a hood in which there was a letter-box shaped slot!

        • Inspector General

          “I’m arresting you son, for not being understanding of racial diversity, or some other like minded bollocks. Look, just piss off and don’t do it again. Evening all”

        • Anton

          It is the people in the other car whose opinions really count here. and I wonder what her insurance company made of it…

          • I don’t know. My acquaintance was told there was to be a prosecution which was why he had to make a statement, but it doesn’t seem to have happened. To add a complication, the other driver was Polish, and hit her car as she emerged from a side road, which does seem to suggest that she didn’t have proper sideways vision. I suspect that the police will put the papers in the “too difficult” box!

  • Uncle Brian

    Might an Israeli flag bumper sticker attract unwanted attention in the UK? In Brazil the message is that the car owner belongs to one of the new Pentecostal churches.

    • The Explorer

      In certain areas of the UK, undoubtedly.

  • Malcolm Smith

    Of course it is partly a case of religious discrimination – if only by default. Whatever the primary reason for the decision, we know they would have had second thoughts if it had been a Muslim, Sikh, or Hindu message, especially if the owner were a member of he religion’s clergy. They would be afraid of the anti-discrimination thought police. Minority religions (except Judaism) always get an easier run when rules and policies are considered. This happens so often, there is no need to cite instances.
    Apart from that, it would be good to hear their official rationale for the decision – if only so that people can know what their rights are.

    • dannybhoy

      Of course the problem is that there are only two main religions which actively proselytise. Being Islam and Christianity. If the devout of either faith start plastering their vehicles with texts, where would it all end?

      • Demon Teddy Bear

        Where indeed. The world would entirely end if people were allowed to place stickers on their own cars without seeking approval from some erk or other… or so a good many in this age seem to believe.

      • Leacock

        In ever more tacky looking vehicles? I don’t see why this should be of much concern for the ensurers.

  • DanJ0

    Perhaps Revd.Wena should do an advertising deal with Age UK and get a discount instead:

    “I got my car insurance from Age UK but I went to Jesus for my life assurance”

    • sarky

      “Or”
      Jesus saves…….me fifty quid on my motor insurance

      • sarky

        “Or”

        Age uk……..what would jesus do?

    • dannybhoy

      That is very good!

  • len

    Putting a Christian motif on your vehicle raises the risk of getting ones vehicles vandalised especially in ‘certain areas’….Its all about the money……

  • Demon Teddy Bear

    Insurance companies … they so hate paying out that they refer to claims as “losses”!! A sticker is a “modification” … what rot! I hope she makes a complaint to the financial ombudsman service.

    • Ian G

      They are useless. They side with the insurers. I know. I’ve tried.

      • Demon Teddy Bear

        They were useless the last time I tried them; but longer ago I think they were OK.

  • david lawton

    Its a decal and is thus a modification – just looked up what classes as a mod. I must admit I did not know. What happens to my GB sticker.

    • Leacock

      Why would a decal count as a modification? By and large I can’t see anyone caring, and if someone chooses to vandalize your vehicle based upon decals then that is a matter for the police. This isn’t some sort of special undercarriage lights.

      • david lawton

        because thats what the insurance policies say. i have looked at a few and that’s what they say.